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  1. Fracture (Chris Tilton & Chad Seiter)

    Custom made soundtrack. At over 30 minutes of solid action themes and fanfares, this has early videogame Giacchino's stamp all over it. Quite cool to hear the disciple of Michael continue in his master's footsteps and churn out something exciting.
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
  2. Thomas Glorieux wrote
    Christodoulides wrote
    You mean a track titled in a way that send to that very scene, contains different music than the scene itself in the movie?


    no, the last track on the disc "I rise, you fall" doesn't contain the music which was heard in the scene in the movie, despite it being that very same scene. It seems (like in some other scores) they started that track by deleting material that came before it

    And it is that material I loved during the movie


    well well, it seems I spoke to soon
    my favourite music actually appears at the end of the previous track "I Claim your Sun"
    oof tongue
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
    •  
      CommentAuthorNautilus
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2009
    Erik Woods wrote
    NP: Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs - John Powell

    First listen...

    *cough... cough* 44 cues?!?!?! shocked

    -Erik-


    Why I don't have this score yet? angry

    NP:Secret of the sahara (Morricone)

    Genius!
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2009
    Christodoulides wrote
    Steven wrote
    Christodoulides wrote
    ..it's be SO good for everyone else if they did the same too wink


    [stoned]Wait.... what?[/stoned]


    The "don't ever notice it", the self-copying thing. Just people getting over it at last.


    Ah, d'oh. face-palm-mt <-me

    Yes, I agree. But I still like discussing his self-plagiarism, because it's an intrinsic part of his style. (But as soon as the discussion turns negative, I would prefer not to continue with it.)
  3. NP: SOMETHING THE LORD MADE -- Christopher Young

    Typical Young lovely'ness, in the style of Horner's latest dramas from time to time smile
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
  4. NP: COMA -- Jerry Goldsmith

    Creepy disturbing music, with even most that will put LOST members to chills (man sometimes it is like listening to LOST shocked )

    The disco tunes are an embarrassment however
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
    •  
      CommentAuthoromaha
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2009 edited
    Thomas Glorieux wrote


    is this better?

    well it is weaker but functional

    the only thing that bothers the shit out of me, where's the one moment I loved in the film? Well it doesn't appear to be on the CD at all, even though the track is on it


    Then the creators of the CD read your comment and :fistbump: (we really need one of these bregt)


    In the end, I'm glad you found that moment. I hate it when that happens.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2009
    omaha wrote
    :fistbump: (we really need one of these bregt)


    Well, we have beer which is kind of similiar.

    Facepalm we needed rather badly though since there was no emoticon that expressed "your comment was so stupid, words fail me". No more do we need to express these things with words! cheesy
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2009
    There's always :forced-fist-bump:
  5. omaha wrote
    In the end, I'm glad you found that moment. I hate it when that happens.


    yeah me too, it is not spectacular, but at least it is amusing that I picked it up in the film smile
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
    •  
      CommentAuthoromaha
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2009
    Steven wrote
    omaha wrote
    :fistbump: (we really need one of these bregt)


    Well, we have beer which is kind of similiar.

    Facepalm we needed rather badly though since there was no emoticon that expressed "your comment was so stupid, words fail me". No more do we need to express these things with words! cheesy


    indeed
    I completely forgot about that one. wink

    Here is a fist bump as bad the Bush one
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il_NAXpD … annel_page

    Do you guys have to suffer these commercials before the movie at the theater as well?


    Way off topic... so,

    Kundun
    Philip Glass

    Reting's Eyes is one of my favs. Love its use in the Apocalypse Now Redux trailer.
  6. Erik Woods wrote
    Christodoulides wrote
    Interesting. I thought it was quite fitting with the helpless tone of the film in places; what was that which distracted you?


    I can't recall because I saw the film back in December but I do recall both my wife and I mentioning in places that the score just didn't work. There were a couple of lengthy sequences were I wish there was no score at all.

    -Erik-


    Congratulations! An assembly of your peers has found you to be ... WRONG! beer

    (J/k - I haven't seen the film, but I do like the album quite a bit.)
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJun 25th 2009
    Mighty Joe Young James Horner

    One of the most appealing things I find about many of Horner's scores is the strong dramatic narrative. Which is to say his scores always work best as a whole album rather than listening to individual tracks. It's just the way he approaches film scoring, it greatly differs to, say, John Williams who's themes can make for excellent compilation albums. (John Williams is a concert composer after all, and James Horner isn't.)

    That's not to say that Horner's scores can't work as compilation albums, but it's sometimes hard to pick out one cue from a Horner score that sums up the entire score. And that's exactly what I like about his scores. This one is a good example of that strong dramatic narrative. It's hard to explain in technical terms, it's more a feeling I guess.
    •  
      CommentAuthorNautilus
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    NP:Ice age: dawn of the Dinosaurs (Powell)

    mmm.....

    After some tracks, I skipped to the "End Credits", wich contains a some kind of old fashioned western fanfarre, wich is really, really impressive. It's fucking cool.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    Nautilus wrote
    NP:Ice age: dawn of the Dinosaurs (Powell)

    mmm.....


    John Powell's favorite planet is Jupiter!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthoromaha
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    Big (1988)

    Always enjoyable smile
    •  
      CommentAuthorNautilus
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    I was playing: Tarzan (Mancina, Collins)

    The score isn't memorable, but it's so nicely orchestrated that is pleasant to listen.

    And I must be one of the few guys who prefer Collins songs over Elthon John's Lion King.

    NP:Alien (Goldsmith)

    I always thought the main theme is a little bit annoying, but I love the soundscape Goldsmith create for the more atmospheric passages.

    Specially this, famous, woodwinds motif.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemonStar
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    Nautilus wrote
    And I must be one of the few guys who prefer Collins songs over Elthon John's Lion King.


    I like both of them, but while TLK's songs had better underlying instrumentation and ethnic vocals, the percussion in Tarzan is kick ass! punk
    •  
      CommentAuthorkeky
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    omaha wrote
    Big (1988)

    Always enjoyable smile


    It's my favourite Shore score. The music and the movie both evoke nice memories in me, I love it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemonStar
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    NP: Secret Weapons Over Normandy - Michael Giacchino

    Excellent! Classic Giacchino action music with some great themes! punk
    •  
      CommentAuthorNautilus
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    NP:War of the worlds ( Williams)

    My first Listen of the whole score.

    It's really impressive. Agressive, dissonant and inventive ( "Intersection scene" is brilliant). You have to be in the right mood, but I love this Williams sound.


    PS: These days, I was watching Spielberg's 3 Sci Fiction movies : Minority report (almost a masterpiece) , A.I (Almost a masterpiece) and War of the Worlds (great moments).
    Januz Kaminsky is great to create the look of this movies, but I pray for Spierlberg move on with a new guy.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    Last time i tried to play:

    MICHAEL GIACCHINO - land of the lost

    One of the most fragmented, odd and careless major scores of the year for me, in violent contrast to the beautifully uplifting and heartwarming "UP". I am glad it's not getting any attention.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
  7. Steven wrote
    Mighty Joe Young James Horner

    One of the most appealing things I find about many of Horner's scores is the strong dramatic narrative. Which is to say his scores always work best as a whole album rather than listening to individual tracks. It's just the way he approaches film scoring, it greatly differs to, say, John Williams who's themes can make for excellent compilation albums. (John Williams is a concert composer after all, and James Horner isn't.)

    That's not to say that Horner's scores can't work as compilation albums, but it's sometimes hard to pick out one cue from a Horner score that sums up the entire score. And that's exactly what I like about his scores. This one is a good example of that strong dramatic narrative. It's hard to explain in technical terms, it's more a feeling I guess.


    Which is why I love the man! Well said.



    Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (James Hannigan)

    Can you imagine James Hannigan enter the film scoring business one day? I sure can. lick

    At least the wonderful music can lay the seeds in the minds of kids who play these things all over the world. So that one day they become full fledged score admirers.
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
    •  
      CommentAuthorNautilus
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    Christodoulides wrote
    Last time i tried to play:

    MICHAEL GIACCHINO - land of the lost

    One of the most fragmented, odd and careless major scores of the year for me, in violent contrast to the beautifully uplifting and heartwarming "UP". I am glad it's not getting any attention.


    Ironic, I probably rate Land of Lost than the most enjoyable Giacchino's score this year. Inventive and with exiting action tracks.

    Ice age 3 is in the same league, very fragmented and underdevoloped but Powell put really powerfull orchestrations (in Bolt like sense of the meaning, not Horton hears fireworks ) into the mix to compensate it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    As someone else on the board -can't remember who- said I'm "Giacchino'd out" for the moment.
    Land Of the Lost was a mess I will probbaly not return to (though I did enjoy the concept of mixing in banjos).
    Up didn't capture me either at first listen, but the overall mood and feel of the score make sme certain that I'll try that one again at some other time when I may be more disposed towards it.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorAtham
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    I'm with Jordi on this.

    I really like Land Of The Lost.

    Giacchino must have had a lot of fun on this score!
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemonStar
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    LoTL takes some time to get used to but it has some really fun parts, IMO. I wouldn't rate it over Up, though.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMarselus
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    Nautilus wrote
    Ironic, I probably rate Land of Lost than the most enjoyable Giacchino's score this year. Inventive and with exiting action tracks.

    I agree. Land of the Lost has some really powerful moments, the last half of the score is amazing. As you say, very fragmented, and you can hear a lot of Lost esque cues, but the last half compensates it with impressive action cues.
    Anything with an orchestra or with a choir....at some point will reach you
    •  
      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009
    Martijn wrote
    As someone else on the board -can't remember who- said I'm "Giacchino'd out" for the moment.
    Land Of the Lost was a mess I will probbaly not return to (though I did enjoy the concept of mixing in banjos).
    Up didn't capture me either at first listen, but the overall mood and feel of the score make sme certain that I'll try that one again at some other time when I may be more disposed towards it.


    I was very pleased with Star Trek but slightly underwhelmed by Up, I have to say. Haven't heard the other one.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMarselus
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2009 edited
    Nautilus wrote
    NP:Ice age: dawn of the Dinosaurs (Powell)

    mmm.....

    After some tracks, I skipped to the "End Credits",

    slant
    Ok, so you didn´t listen Powell reinventing himself (once again) with this work. Again with an animated project, Powell shows originality, freshness, nice orchestrations, epic choral moments, all trademarked with Powell´s style when dealing with this kind of films. A winner.
    Anything with an orchestra or with a choir....at some point will reach you