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      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJul 31st 2009
    To any of you that are familiar with the program here is my question. I'm trying to convert an MP3 file to a smaller MP3 file so I can put it up on a website. I've converted wave to MP3 using the Lame program. When I try to convert I get the window saying it isn't in the library, a loop so to speak.
    Thomas
    listen to more classical music!
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      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJul 31st 2009
    And yes I did forget to change the category. It is sort of general.
    listen to more classical music!
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      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJul 31st 2009
    My goal is 22khz at 24kbps. It is voice only
    listen to more classical music!
  1. I'm not sure I understand the problem, Tom.

    When you mention that it isn't in the library, do you mean that the file you are trying to convert can't be found? Or is the format you are trying to convert to can't be found?

    I don't normally use Audacity to convert mp3s - I usually use it to edit tracks. But the "Export as MP3" in the "File" drop down menu should be the route to go. Maybe if you go to Edit > Preferences > Quality, or maybe even Edit > Preferences > File Formats?

    In this latter route there's a button to "Find Library" in the "MP3 Export Setup" portion of the window.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorplindboe
    • CommentTimeJul 31st 2009
    I must admit I don't understand the OP either. I don't understand what the whole wav convertion thing has to do with the goal of converting an mp3 to a smaller mp3.

    When I want to convert an mp3 to a smaller mp3, I open the original mp3 in Audacity. After that I go to the Preferences/Options (or whatever it's called in the english version of the program) and then I select the smaller bitrate. Then I simply export as an mp3.

    Peter smile
  2. Tom, I've used "mp3-wma converter" to convert wma, mp3 files, etc back and forth between formats and reducing rates, etc. This may be an easier program to use compared with Audacity.

    Here's a link to a review and a download:

    http://download.cnet.com/Free-Mp3-Wma-C … 42362.html

    I use it all the time and have no trouble.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
  3. Does it have to be a smaller MP3? If hosting limit is the problem, you can always have a embedded YouTube clip with just the play bar.
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.
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      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJul 31st 2009
    Justin you hit the nail on the head. I have a big MP3 file and I want to make it into a smaller file i.e. from 100 mg to 8 mg. Can I do that in Audacity?
    Thomas
    listen to more classical music!
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJul 31st 2009
    sdtom wrote
    Justin you hit the nail on the head. I have a big MP3 file and I want to make it into a smaller file i.e. from 100 mg to 8 mg. Can I do that in Audacity?
    Thomas


    You can do that in Adobe Audition. Why aren't you using that?

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  4. You can decrease the sample rate in Audacity, then export it and see if the file size has decreased, but with a YouTube embedded clip, no need to decrease. I have samples nearly ten minutes in length, at HD sound qaulity loaded to YouTube.
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.
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      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJul 31st 2009
    Erik Woods wrote


    You can do that in Adobe Audition. Why aren't you using that?

    -Erik-


    The computer that I'm stuck with for the present doesn't have Audition. I might just have to wait until I get my computer. Its in the mail.
    Thomas
    listen to more classical music!
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      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJul 31st 2009
    At least I don't feel stupid in this case about not knowing. The person who made the recording didn't follow my instructions and converted the file to an MP3 from a Wave. Perhaps I can get a copy of the Wave file. If so I can do it. Thanks for all of the help.
    Thomas
    listen to more classical music!
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMar 3rd 2017
    I recorded a 2-hour Disney special with a guest yesterday. Unfortunately, I had forgotten to adjust the recorder, so it only recorded my side, not the guest's side. As a result, my voice is much louder than his (whose voice comes in on my side of the microphone).

    So....does anyone know what I can do to to equalize this? I use Audacity. It's too much job to 'boost' his voice here and there, because our conversation constantly overlaps.
    I am extremely serious.
  5. I am not sure how you could fix the sound on this without introducing a bit of distortion - especially during the parts where your voices overlay.

    Could you re-record your own side of it and edit out and modify the guest's voice. Or - and this is worst case scenario - you may have to resort to making it a text-based interview (if it is an interview).

    You've probably thought of all this already and so these suggestions may not be much use.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
  6. Audacity is fine. I also recommend Nero Wave Editor, which has turned into a free tool.

    Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMar 3rd 2017
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    I am not sure how you could fix the sound on this without introducing a bit of distortion - especially during the parts where your voices overlay.

    Could you re-record your own side of it and edit out and modify the guest's voice. Or - and this is worst case scenario - you may have to resort to making it a text-based interview (if it is an interview).

    You've probably thought of all this already and so these suggestions may not be much use.


    Thanks. As it is now, I'll probably run it as is. The alternatives seem too overwhelming.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2017 edited
    I gave you options at the IFMCA. Did any of those work?

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  7. Thor wrote
    I recorded a 2-hour Disney special with a guest yesterday. Unfortunately, I had forgotten to adjust the recorder, so it only recorded my side, not the guest's side. As a result, my voice is much louder than his (whose voice comes in on my side of the microphone).

    So....does anyone know what I can do to to equalize this? I use Audacity. It's too much job to 'boost' his voice here and there, because our conversation constantly overlaps.


    If you recorded both at the same time (one sound file), you can't fix either unless one of the people is on the left channel only and the other on the right channel only, then you'd be able to split the channels and raise the volumes on the one needed.


    Now, if you didn't talk when the guest was talking, you can do one of two things:

    1. Lower your voice excerpts, or...

    2. Raise his. Depending on the level of the highest voice.


    It may be annoying and a little time consuming, but you just highlight part of, for example, your voice, click on the Effect tab button, click on Amplify... from the selections, and experment. If it's really loud, you may want to start with typing -5.0

    You can undo and try again until you reach the level you desire, then repeat for each other excerpt of you talking. On the keyboard I am using, I can press down Ctrl/b] and press [b]R and it will repeat the last thing you did, so if that works for you, it will repeat a decrease of -5.0 (for example).
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2017
    Thanks, Justin. I'm aware of the 'effects' and 'amplify' options; but I thought maybe there was some button that equalized the whole file (making my voice lower and his voice louder, so that they were more or less the same).
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2017
    In other words, there MUST be a way to equalize the conversation with a single click, so that it's all more or less the same volume (without actually going in and amplifying my guest's voice, which is a tremendous task since there's a LOT of overlap in our conversation)?
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2017
    Erik Woods wrote
    I gave you options at the IFMCA. Did any of those work?

    -Erik-


    Not yet. I'm still trying out stuff and googling around....but thanks.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2017
    Or if there is another (free) software that can do this? I tried something called "Levelator", but it doesn't accept mp3s.
    I am extremely serious.
  8. Thor wrote
    Or if there is another (free) software that can do this? I tried something called "Levelator", but it doesn't accept mp3s.


    Captain Future wrote
    Audacity is fine. I also recommend Nero Wave Editor, which has turned into a free tool.

    Volker


    As I said. Not sure though if this helps you. You can edit and tweak one wave file at a time. You can't do any mix-downs.
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2017
    Yeah, that's also a wav program. I'm going to try and convert the file to wav, then use Levelator, then convert back to mp3 (if it manages to actually level), and then start editing the track. Phew -- one would think there would be an easier way to do this very BASIC thing, considering how many podcasts there are out there, with so many unevenly recorded voices.
    I am extremely serious.
  9. I don't know if you can normalize, but you have to consider that such an option may not yeild wanted results; it could lower the louder part and make it too hard to understand at times, and it could raise the quieter part and possibly had unwanted hiss, especially if you don't have things set up to remove all the background (which can be impossible with a cheap-O sound card).

    Keep in mind that just becauzse you can't find a certain feature in Audacity, doesn't mean there isn't one available; some people make things for Audacity that you can use. For example, sometimes this version I am running crashes when I press the stop button, but I got a recovery program and added it to the Audacity program where it will rebuilt the audio into the left and right channels and I can re-combine them and re-set the rate back t owhat it was. A nifty tool.
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2017 edited
    Well, it kinda worked. Converting to wav, then using Levelator, then converting back to mp3 -- and the volume is more or less level (even if my guest's voice is more "echoey"). The drawback is that I also got a lot more background noise (touching of the table surface etc.), but I can't have it all.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2017
    Why are you converting back to MP3? Why was it originally in MP3?

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2017
    BTW did you try using the installed compressor in Audacity like I suggested? Levelator is just essentially a compressor. What were the results?

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2017
    Erik Woods wrote
    Why are you converting back to MP3? Why was it originally in MP3?

    -Erik-


    It was originally in mp3, because recording in wav takes up too much space on my recorder. But you're right; I could probably have edited in wav, and then converted to mp3 afterwards (but I'm unsure if I can insert my mp3 score tracks in a wav format).

    I tried to figure out the compressor in Audacity, but it didn't turn out as well as the Levelator thingie. The results were decent; you can check it out when I publish the program in a few days. As I said earlier, I got a bit more background noise, but that's better than very uneven volumes.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMar 4th 2017 edited
    Of course, now another issue has arisen. Wordpress only allows a 128MB file upload, and the program is 133MB. I'll try to cut out a few bits, but is there any way to 'preview' the export size before actually exporting? It's quite a hassle to export it, wait 30 minutes for the procedure to finish, and then realize I didn't cut out enough material. It's still too big.
    I am extremely serious.