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  1. Erik Woods wrote
    DreamTheater wrote
    Fracture (Chris Tilton & Chad Seiter)


    I'm listening to this, too, and all I have to say is... GO, GO, GO!

    -Erik-


    Spectacular cue, that one !!!! punk

    BTW, the next listen is full of such cues:

    Epics (Erich Kunzel & Cincinnati Pops)

    First listen and certainly not my last. Superb stuff, I love such compilations with not the usual selection of music, this one concentrates on the great epics of the past, such as Spartacus, Gone With the Wind, Ben Hur, Gladiator, Fellowship of the Ring, The Magnificent Seven and more. Not sure if Harry Potter, Pearl Harbor or Minority Report could be considered epics, but then the music sure has a place here in between the other rousing pieces. Love the arrangement of Gladiator which is so much better than the one recorded with the Prague Philharmonic on another compilation I have. Fellowship has a nice suite too with a truly unique and fantastic ending. I'm going to order this soon. Like I said I adore such albums. punk
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
    •  
      CommentAuthorNautilus
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010 edited
    Changed to...

    NP:LOST season 1

    I remember the first time I hear it, I though : Wow! what an impressive mix of dissonant and agressive music, with gorgeous dramatic pieces. (and at the time I was not a fan of Giacchino's music for MOH saga)

    Season 1 remains the strongest of the whole albums. Season 3 is the terms of themes (I love Juliett's, kate's, Island's, Demond's...) but Season 1 is the best in terms of the overall listening experience.

    an Overture (the vangelis-like "eyeland") an a great Ending ( parting words, Oceanic 815). Atmospheric Synthetisers, tribal and ethnic elements, traditional orchestra. the 2 main themes makes coherent the whole thing.

    A Masterpiece.
  2. Once again I found myself listening to "The Journey of Natty Gann" (Honer).


    What a fantastic score. At the least, the very, very least, if you can't afford to get a used copy of the OOP Intrada CD, then do yourself a favor and get a CD-R if you don't have this score.
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010
    Or just do a google search for a download link.
  3. If you're into that kind of thing. If you want a lossless CD-R copy, feel free to PM me and we'll discuss, score lovers.
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010
    Indeed, it's nice to have the lossless files as back up if you have the hard drive space. High quality MP3s (or AACs in my case) work just as well though... unless you have a particularly good sound system and Superman's hearing.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAtham
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010
    Erik Woods wrote
    To start off the new thread I'm spinning...

    NP: Quo Vadis - Miklos Rozsa
    The Royal Philharmonic conducted by the composer


    Out of the three big choral epics - Ben Hur, King of Kings and Quo Vadis - this is the one that I'm sadly unfamiliar with. This recording opens with the "Prelude" - an orchestral/choral stunner - and moves right into the drama with classic Rozsa orchestrations and themes. An excellent score and a very good recording. This album is coupled with Ben Hur also conducted by Rozsa but performed by the National Philharmonic. A great album!

    -Erik-


    Ben Hur conducted by Rozsa and performed by the National Philharmonic was the very first Compact Disc I ever bought. That and Enemy Mine together I think. That was back in 86!
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010
    Eric wrote
    The Descent Part 2 - David Julyan

    My first listen ...


    You liked it?

    Nautilus wrote
    NP:District 9

    Who said it was a mind blowing synth score?

    it's a synth score, with every single cliché of this kind of music. new age vocals, metallic percusion, etc...

    Boring!


    It is very imaginative, if only all 'synth' scores sounded like this, with proper themes, melodic development and organic instrumental soli. Re-listen.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
  4. Who needs hard drive space when you got perfectly good CD-Rs...


    And for a fucking goddman millionth time -- I, as well as others, can hear the difference.
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2010
    justin boggan wrote
    Who needs hard drive space when you got perfectly good CD-Rs...


    That's true. But I'm not too concerned with this since I, as well as others, use my computer/s as a jukebox.


    And for a fucking goddman millionth time -- I, as well as others, can hear the difference.


    For the millionth time, no, you can't. With a low bit rate MP3s, yes you definitely can (I see many 128 rips and it makes me cringe). But anything over 192kbps becomes increasingly difficult to hear any discrepancies. At 320kbps, you just won't be able to tell the difference.... especially if it's AAC format, which is supposedly more advanced than MP3.

    It also depends on how and where you heard these MP3s you allegedly heard discrepancies of quality. If you heard them through PC speakers, or something equivalent, then no wonder you thought you could hear a difference! Given a blind test, say a 320 AAC file and a Lossless file of the same track riped to a CD each played on the same sound system, you simply would not be able to differentiate the two. This is a fact, and you admitting otherwise is shear bloody-mindedness. Unless, as I said, you have a particularly good sound system plus the hearing of Superman.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    Erik Woods wrote
    Ditto! Mickey mousing is part of the film music fabric and has been associated with film music since its earliest years. Unfortunately, it's has become a lost and forgotten skill. I agree that if done improperly it's can be grating and distracting BUT if done properly by a composer who has practiced and honed the skill it becomes an essential device that can be used most effectively when called for.


    Absolutely. When done well it can work very well, both in the film and on CD. It's been done well quite recently too (thinking of Silvestri's Mouse Hunt, Randy Newman's Pixar scores, Kamen's 101 Dalmatians).
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    Southall wrote

    Absolutely. When done well it can work very well, both in the film and on CD. It's been done well quite recently too (thinking of Silvestri's Mouse Hunt, Randy Newman's Pixar scores, Kamen's 101 Dalmatians).


    All excellent examples!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorlp
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    NP: Predator - Alan Silvestri.

    Some very standout cues, dripping with some typical muscular writing, especially the main theme, but damm there are so much underscore here. It's a score that works so much better IN the movie.
  5. I love that underscore, it gets under your skin. Predator sounds unlike anything else out there, at least anything else not composed by Silvestri... punk
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    lp wrote
    NP: Predator - Alan Silvestri.

    Some very standout cues, dripping with some typical muscular writing, especially the main theme, but damm there are so much underscore here. It's a score that works so much better IN the movie.


    I love it in and out of the movie! Great score!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    • CommentAuthoradam
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010 edited
    Nautilus wrote
    NP:District 9

    Who said it was a mind blowing synth score?

    it's a synth score, with every single cliché of this kind of music. new age vocals, metallic percusion, etc...

    Boring!


    Huge pet peeve of mine -- middle eastern-style wailing vocals in hollywood soundtracks. Like fingernails on chalk.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    adam wrote
    Nautilus wrote
    NP:District 9

    Who said it was a mind blowing synth score?

    it's a synth score, with every single cliché of this kind of music. new age vocals, metallic percusion, etc...

    Boring!


    Huge pet peeve of mine -- middle eastern-style wailing vocals in hollywood soundtracks. Like fingernails on chalk.


    If it works in context with the film, it's characters and/or location I'm fine with it. It's usually not my cup of tea either and was initially the reason I was turned off a score like Horner's THE FOUR FEATHERS, but now, for some reason, I adore that score. District 9, on the other hand, did nothing for me.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    lp wrote
    NP: Predator - Alan Silvestri.

    Some very standout cues, dripping with some typical muscular writing, especially the main theme, but damm there are so much underscore here. It's a score that works so much better IN the movie.


    I know quite a few people do it, but why is "underscore" used as a derogatory term? I've never understood it. Film music IS underscore, whether it's bland synth noodling or the theme from Star Wars.
  6. Southall wrote
    lp wrote
    NP: Predator - Alan Silvestri.

    Some very standout cues, dripping with some typical muscular writing, especially the main theme, but damm there are so much underscore here. It's a score that works so much better IN the movie.


    I know quite a few people do it, but why is "underscore" used as a derogatory term? I've never understood it. Film music IS underscore, whether it's bland synth noodling or the theme from Star Wars.


    Well a theme IMO is not underscore. A (good) theme is supposed to be memorable. Underscore is supposed to enhance the mood of a particular cue, while not exactly being memorable, though it can be when used around a good theme or motif.
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
    •  
      CommentAuthorlp
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    DreamTheater wrote
    Southall wrote
    lp wrote
    NP: Predator - Alan Silvestri.

    Some very standout cues, dripping with some typical muscular writing, especially the main theme, but damm there are so much underscore here. It's a score that works so much better IN the movie.


    I know quite a few people do it, but why is "underscore" used as a derogatory term? I've never understood it. Film music IS underscore, whether it's bland synth noodling or the theme from Star Wars.


    Well a theme IMO is not underscore. A (good) theme is supposed to be memorable. Underscore is supposed to enhance the mood of a particular cue, while not exactly being memorable, though it can be when used around a good theme or motif.


    Took the words out of my mouth. I love Predator, the movie. It's a great movie that is very suspenseful 50% of the time and Silvestri's music is largely responsible for that. And as much as I like the music, it wasn't meant to be listened to for the whole 70 minutes outside of the movie, no matter how well crafted it is.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    Southall wrote
    lp wrote
    NP: Predator - Alan Silvestri.

    Some very standout cues, dripping with some typical muscular writing, especially the main theme, but damm there are so much underscore here. It's a score that works so much better IN the movie.


    I know quite a few people do it, but why is "underscore" used as a derogatory term? I've never understood it. Film music IS underscore, whether it's bland synth noodling or the theme from Star Wars.


    I agree. We need a different word than underscore for "really boring music that isn't interesting to me."

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    lp wrote
    And as much as I like the music, it wasn't meant to be listened to for the whole 70 minutes outside of the movie, no matter how well crafted it is.


    Well, I for one love every single note of that score and am glad that Varese released the complete version.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    DreamTheater wrote
    Well a theme IMO is not underscore. A (good) theme is supposed to be memorable. Underscore is supposed to enhance the mood of a particular cue, while not exactly being memorable, though it can be when used around a good theme or motif.


    I know what you're saying and it's just semantics, but why is a theme meant to be memorable but underscore not supposed to be memorable? The whole thing IS underscore. A film score IS underscore. It underscores the film. The Imperial March underscores Darth Vader. It IS underscore.
  7. Underscore can be memorable - particularly when heard away from the film. A lot of what Herrmann wrote could be classed as "underscore" (all those times he just varies a short cell of music in a variety of permutations) but it's very memorable.

    I'm sure that underscore in a film has some sort of subconscious effect on the emotions.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorlp
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    Erik Woods wrote
    lp wrote
    And as much as I like the music, it wasn't meant to be listened to for the whole 70 minutes outside of the movie, no matter how well crafted it is.


    Well, I for one love every single note of that score and am glad that Varese released the complete version.

    -Erik-


    Well, you got me there. I enjoy having the complete version, but I sure as heck can't listen to it all the way through.
    •  
      CommentAuthorlp
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    Southall wrote
    DreamTheater wrote
    Well a theme IMO is not underscore. A (good) theme is supposed to be memorable. Underscore is supposed to enhance the mood of a particular cue, while not exactly being memorable, though it can be when used around a good theme or motif.


    I know what you're saying and it's just semantics, but why is a theme meant to be memorable but underscore not supposed to be memorable? The whole thing IS underscore. A film score IS underscore. It underscores the film. The Imperial March underscores Darth Vader. It IS underscore.


    Well it is, but it is also thematic and melodic as well, which I'm sure is what you're pointing at anyway.
    •  
      CommentAuthorlp
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    Erik Woods wrote
    Southall wrote
    lp wrote
    NP: Predator - Alan Silvestri.

    Some very standout cues, dripping with some typical muscular writing, especially the main theme, but damm there are so much underscore here. It's a score that works so much better IN the movie.


    I know quite a few people do it, but why is "underscore" used as a derogatory term? I've never understood it. Film music IS underscore, whether it's bland synth noodling or the theme from Star Wars.


    I agree. We need a different word than underscore for "really boring music that isn't interesting to me."

    -Erik-


    Musical noodling? cool
  8. Crap?
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    adam wrote
    Nautilus wrote
    NP:District 9

    Who said it was a mind blowing synth score?

    it's a synth score, with every single cliché of this kind of music. new age vocals, metallic percusion, etc...

    Boring!


    Huge pet peeve of mine -- middle eastern-style wailing vocals in hollywood soundtracks. Like fingernails on chalk.


    Me too! Though as Erik mentioned earlier it does have it's place in scores when applied in the right context.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    • CommentAuthoradam
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2010
    Timmer wrote
    adam wrote
    Nautilus wrote
    NP:District 9

    Who said it was a mind blowing synth score?

    it's a synth score, with every single cliché of this kind of music. new age vocals, metallic percusion, etc...

    Boring!


    Huge pet peeve of mine -- middle eastern-style wailing vocals in hollywood soundtracks. Like fingernails on chalk.


    Me too! Though as Erik mentioned earlier it does have it's place in scores when applied in the right context.


    Yeah, maybe a movie set in the middle east?