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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2011
    Timmer wrote
    Thor wrote
    THE PACIFIC is fine, albeit very "american" and Hollywood in sentiments and portrayal. The Japanese are basically just this anonymous "mass" that is slaughtered by the numbers.


    They show it pretty much as it was. Anyway, this story wasn't shown from the Japanese viewpoint, you can see Clint Eastwood's Sands of Iwo Jima for a take on that.


    Yeah, I've seen it. But even that is a bit culture-stereotypical as it's channeled through Western eyes. The Japanese behave very "American", if you know what I mean. I'd rather watch Japanese films, even animated brilliance like GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES to really showcase the nation's trauma in relation to the war.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorplindboe
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2011
    Thor wrote
    Disagree with THE EXPENDABLES. That was actually one of my favourite films of 2010.


    Not one of my favourites, but it was indeed entertaining.

    I do like the Razzie Awards concept, but it annoys me that they frequently nominate average to good stuff, simply because the movies are big and popular, instead of just nominating the really bad.

    Worse examples are Morricone's "The thing" and "Butterfly" that were nominated for worst scores. These people are more clueless than the Oscars.

    Peter smile
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2011
    Thor wrote
    Timmer wrote
    Thor wrote
    THE PACIFIC is fine, albeit very "american" and Hollywood in sentiments and portrayal. The Japanese are basically just this anonymous "mass" that is slaughtered by the numbers.


    They show it pretty much as it was. Anyway, this story wasn't shown from the Japanese viewpoint, you can see Clint Eastwood's Sands of Iwo Jima for a take on that.


    Yeah, I've seen it. But even that is a bit culture-stereotypical as it's channeled through Western eyes. The Japanese behave very "American", if you know what I mean. I'd rather watch Japanese films, even animated brilliance like GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES to really showcase the nation's trauma in relation to the war.


    The Japanese commited attrocities in WW II, will they address that in their films too?
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
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      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2011
    Even if some educated youngster wanted to, which film maker in their right mind would ever do that amidst the ehem...cough, free speech environment of Asian countries today?
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
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      CommentAuthorplindboe
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2011
    Erik Woods wrote
    Inception blew my fucking mind on the first viewing because I couldn't really figure it all out after just one viewing but once I saw the film again I realized that it was complex just for the sake of being complex. The score still sucks in context.


    Why does everyone call Inception complex? I don't get it. It seemed straightforward to me. A movie like Memento on the other hand I had to watch a couple of times before I figured it out and I'm sure there's still stuff I haven't realized.

    Peter smile
  1. plindboe wrote
    Erik Woods wrote
    Inception blew my fucking mind on the first viewing because I couldn't really figure it all out after just one viewing but once I saw the film again I realized that it was complex just for the sake of being complex. The score still sucks in context.


    Why does everyone call Inception complex? I don't get it. It seemed straightforward to me. A movie like Memento on the other hand I had to watch a couple of times before I figured it out and I'm sure there's still stuff I haven't realized.

    Peter smile


    Inception is straightforward, and yet it's not. It gives you the feeling you understand the main general idea behind it, and the end in general. But I think there is much more behind it too, which you will not even get after multiple viewings. It leaves a lot of questions unanswered as well, but with multiple answers so that people can fill in their own plausible explanation
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2011
    plindboe wrote
    Erik Woods wrote
    Inception blew my fucking mind on the first viewing because I couldn't really figure it all out after just one viewing but once I saw the film again I realized that it was complex just for the sake of being complex. The score still sucks in context.


    Why does everyone call Inception complex? I don't get it. It seemed straightforward to me. A movie like Memento on the other hand I had to watch a couple of times before I figured it out and I'm sure there's still stuff I haven't realized.

    Peter smile


    Well, there is a lot to take in on first viewing.... especially the last act. Trying to keep track of where everyone is, what they are doing, the time shifts, the rules, yada, yada, yada. IT's far too much to take in in one viewing which I think is the films major flaw.

    Yes, Memento as well is much more complex but I find that film a helluvalot more satisfying than Inception.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
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      CommentAuthorplindboe
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2011
    Perhaps Inception is so complex that I don't realize it's complex. wink But yes, I do agree that there's much to take in. I'm not saying I'm clever or anything, as there are many movies I can't follow well at all, but perhaps Inception is just the type of movie my brain handles well.

    I plan to see it again soon and perhaps I'll get a more nuanced view of it.

    Peter smile
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2011
    Timmer wrote
    The Japanese commited attrocities in WW II, will they address that in their films too?


    Well, obviously not the flims that were made at the time (and some years after) due to strict censorship, but there are wondeful examples of that too, yes. Like THE BURMESE HARP (1956). Theres also NONE BUT THE BRAVE (1965), which is a co-production between USA and Japan (and featuring an excellent John Williams score!), THE HUMAN BULLET (1968), BAREFOOT GEN (1983, another brilliant animation film). You'd have to count MERRY CHRISTMAS, MR. LAWRENCE too, perhaps, another co-production.

    I'm always very critical of films that lean too much to either sides.
    I am extremely serious.
  2. plindboe wrote
    Perhaps Inception is so complex that I don't realize it's complex. wink But yes, I do agree that there's much to take in. I'm not saying I'm clever or anything, as there are many movies I can't follow well at all, but perhaps Inception is just the type of movie my brain handles well.

    I plan to see it again soon and perhaps I'll get a more nuanced view of it.

    Peter smile


    Inception is only as complex as your attention span allows it to be. You let your mind slip for a microsecond, you're bound to miss something vital to the plot. I let my attention span slip quite often on the first viewing, which is understandable in the cinema, and also because the movie throws so much at you, just like Erik said. At home I was able to watch it more attentively and got better into the flow of the movie.
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
  3. Timmer wrote
    Erik, I just finished watching THE PACIFIC and I absolutely loved it, it's different but, IMO, just as good as BAND OF BROTHERS, watch the rest of it, it's superb, it's true stories, all the characters are based on the real people, some of the casting when compared to the real soldiers seen in the last episode were uncanny in resemblance.

    a 10/10 series for me.


    I missed something too with The Pacific, an underlying emotional core which I felt was missing. Maybe because the stories were so grim and dark I wasn't able to connect emotionally. I watched it all the way and by the end I wasn't exactly thrilled, nor was I flatout disappointed. It just was a bit stale. And I remember Band of Brothers being 'more memorable'.
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
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      CommentAuthorplindboe
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2011
    Thomas Glorieux wrote
    a real shame indeed to nominate Sylvester Stallone for worst director, that movie nor the man doesn't deserve that. Because you don't have to take The Expendables serious at all


    I wouldn't think that Stallone feels bad about it, so calling it a real shame seems a bit over the top. He probably had a laugh when he heard about the Razzie nomination.

    Peter smile
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2011
    DreamTheater wrote
    Timmer wrote
    Erik, I just finished watching THE PACIFIC and I absolutely loved it, it's different but, IMO, just as good as BAND OF BROTHERS, watch the rest of it, it's superb, it's true stories, all the characters are based on the real people, some of the casting when compared to the real soldiers seen in the last episode were uncanny in resemblance.

    a 10/10 series for me.


    I missed something too with The Pacific, an underlying emotional core which I felt was missing. Maybe because the stories were so grim and dark I wasn't able to connect emotionally. I watched it all the way and by the end I wasn't exactly thrilled, nor was I flatout disappointed. It just was a bit stale. And I remember Band of Brothers being 'more memorable'.


    The Pacific was much more personal than Band of brothers, I think this would become far clearer if you watched the making of and interviews with the real people involved.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2011
    Thor wrote
    Timmer wrote
    The Japanese commited attrocities in WW II, will they address that in their films too?


    Well, obviously not the flims that were made at the time (and some years after) due to strict censorship, but there are wondeful examples of that too, yes. Like THE BURMESE HARP (1956). Theres also NONE BUT THE BRAVE (1965), which is a co-production between USA and Japan (and featuring an excellent John Williams score!), THE HUMAN BULLET (1968), BAREFOOT GEN (1983, another brilliant animation film). You'd have to count MERRY CHRISTMAS, MR. LAWRENCE too, perhaps, another co-production.

    I'm always very critical of films that lean too much to either sides.


    Maybe it's because you're from Norway, Thor, In my life I've known a number of people who were involved in the war against Japan, including my own father who was in Burma and experienced stuff that is hard to imagine ( only ever told to me by my mother, my dad wouldn't talk about anything serious regarding his involvement to me ) or his friend, our neighbor, who lived next door who spent most of the war as a Japanese prisoner of war who ( unlike my dad ) wished that the Americans had atomically wiped then from the face of the earth, he described the film The Bridge On The River Kwai as 'a holiday camp' a film that was a total joke, one of many who could never forgive them. As far as I know the Japanese authoraties have never given a full apology for their actions during this time.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2011
    Timmer wrote
    DreamTheater wrote
    Timmer wrote
    Erik, I just finished watching THE PACIFIC and I absolutely loved it, it's different but, IMO, just as good as BAND OF BROTHERS, watch the rest of it, it's superb, it's true stories, all the characters are based on the real people, some of the casting when compared to the real soldiers seen in the last episode were uncanny in resemblance.

    a 10/10 series for me.


    I missed something too with The Pacific, an underlying emotional core which I felt was missing. Maybe because the stories were so grim and dark I wasn't able to connect emotionally. I watched it all the way and by the end I wasn't exactly thrilled, nor was I flatout disappointed. It just was a bit stale. And I remember Band of Brothers being 'more memorable'.


    The Pacific was much more personal than Band of brothers, I think this would become far clearer if you watched the making of and interviews with the real people involved.


    Even with the interviews it still didn't did much for me. The soap opera storytelling killed it for me.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2011
    But you haven't even watched the whole series.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
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      CommentAuthorLSH
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2011
    I watched this series whilst at uni last year and only made it up to episode 7 (I think). I really must catch up because I enjoyed it immensely. And I agree with Tim about it being more personal than the admittedly brilliant Band Of Brothers - I got that feeling completely.
  4. So did I. It's like The Thin Red Line without the philosophical background.

    Tim, what did you think of the score and Zimmer's main title theme?
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2011
    I thought it was pretty good, very much in keeping with Kamen's BOB and I liked some of the series scoring, at least what I noticed.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt