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  1. Thor wrote
    How are your feelings about this thread these days, generally?

    I do find it interesting that there is so little interest outside of the usual contributors. When it was the "Golden Age" years it was assumed that once we got to more recent years then more people would voice their own choices. But that doesn't seem to have happened to the extent I thought would happen.

    I am very grateful for those people who have regularly contributed to the thread and for sharing their own thoughts on my choices as well as their own favourites. And I am also grateful to those people who badger me for the next year (I do have a shortlist for 2004 ready to whittle down to the final choice.)

    I am finding it difficult to choose quickly as I like to re-appraise my favourites year-on-year and as I get closer to 2012 the number of scores I have for each year us rapidly increasing.

    I am glad that I have been doing it but am looking forward to finishing at 2011 - and then adding a title each year after that. I may also just make occasional changes to specific years if stand-out scores are released that assume top spots during their respective years.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2012
    there just doesn't seem to be as many posters anymore confused

    Anyway, a very interesting list Alan, I'll give my feedback tomorrow.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
  2. Timmer wrote
    There just doesn't seem to be as many posters anymore confused

    Maybe I've drawn the length of this "project" out too long and most of the people with only a peripheral interest have lost what little interest they had.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2012
    Alan - Thank you for bringing this score to the forefront. I had never heard of it until I read your review and after hearing some samples of the score on YouTube I can't wait to download this one from iTunes. It's the quintessential Erik Woods film score!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2012 edited
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    Timmer wrote
    There just doesn't seem to be as many posters anymore confused

    Maybe I've drawn the length of this "project" out too long and most of the people with only a peripheral interest have lost what little interest they had.


    What you need to do is finish this, then make sure you save all of your reviews and then publish them in a separate blog. Or create a book (I did a beer book using iPhoto and my own pictures) and have it as a coffee table item in your own house for guests to flip through.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  3. As usual, Alan, most of the scores you mentioned are unfamiliar to me, and you did not mention most of my favorites from the year. smile This is precisely the reason why threads like this are helpful.

    THE RETURN OF THE KING is the most impressive score of the year for me. It's my favorite of the LOTR scores, and that's saying something. They're all great, and this one is the best of bunch (for me).

    I really enjoy Frizell's GODS AND GENERALS. So much of that album is so good. This was a recent discovery for me and one of those discoveries that was so pleasantly suprising that I was reminded why I love film music.

    Despite the (over)reliance on just one theme, I quite enjoy Gregson-Williams's SINBAD score. It's swashbuckling fun throughout.

    I also really enjoy Horner's THE MISSING. Sure there are some tracks that I can live without. So I don't play those! And what I'm left with is a really solid 50 min. album. I think the last four tracks are particularly good.

    Powell's PAYCHECK is a significant score, and contains one of the best pieces of music he has ever written.

    Elfman's BIG FISH has some really fine moments in it. It's probably my least favorite of the scores I'm mentioning, but it has some really beautiful stuff.

    My favorite score of the year, however is Armstrong's LOVE, ACTUALLY. I have a hard time giving top honors to it because it's so short, but it's my favorite, so there you go. It's just so happy, so alive, and those last two score cues are just bursting with thematic grandeur. I can understand how others might see this score as an insignificant one, but I really love it and would buy a proper score release in a heartbeat.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2012
    Hey Alan, kudos for an offbeat and interesting choice for 2003. Never heard of it before.

    As for the activity, there seems to be a slump in maintitles in general, not just in your thread. Don't know why....I assume people have interesting and/or troublesome lives to deal with. It's really just a couple of handfuls of people who move things along.

    Anyways, for 2003, I'd have to wait untill FSM is back up (the board has been down all day) because my honourable mentions and picks are in the 2003 thread there.
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2012
    OK, FSM seems to be back up for the moment.

    My honourable mentions for 2003 are BIG FISH (Danny Elfman), S.W.A.T. (Elliot Goldenthal), THE LAST SAMURAI (Hans Zimmer), PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: CURSE OF THE BLACK PEARL (Klaus Badelt/Hans Zimmer), THE CORE (Christopher Young), GOOD BYE LENIN! (Yann Tiersen), HULK (Danny Elfman), KILL BILL, VOL. 1 (Various), THE MATRIX RELOADED & REVOLUTIONS (Don Davis) and MONSTER (BT).

    But I have to be awfully predictable and choose:

    THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING (Howard Shore)
    I am extremely serious.
  4. A lot of the titles are ones that do have tracks that I really enjoy. But I find the titles I mention more satisfying overall. The third installment of Shore's trilogy is very strong - and has some excellent tracks - and does a good job of bringing everything together. But, in some ways, there is just too much to appreciate it fully?

    Thanks for the comments so far and I am glad that I am introducing some excellent music to people.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2012
    Timmer wrote
    there just doesn't seem to be as many posters anymore confused


    You're correct I fear. My mono thread got one response from Alan.
    Tom
    listen to more classical music!
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2012
    sdtom wrote
    Timmer wrote
    there just doesn't seem to be as many posters anymore confused


    You're correct I fear. My mono thread got one response from Alan.
    Tom


    Well, it was a niche topic, Tom.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorplindboe
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2012 edited
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    Thor wrote
    How are your feelings about this thread these days, generally?

    I do find it interesting that there is so little interest outside of the usual contributors. When it was the "Golden Age" years it was assumed that once we got to more recent years then more people would voice their own choices. But that doesn't seem to have happened to the extent I thought would happen.


    The usual contributors are pure awesomeness though, and count for 10 normal contributors each. So if you do the math think of it as about 80 normal contributors. wink

    Anyway, it's more to do with the way threads are arranged here on MT. When a person who hasn't followed the thread from the beginning sees a thread with 1752 posts, it can be a little intimidating. Also, people tend to follow threads depending on how it begins. If they're not interested in Golden Age scores, they'll tend to ignore it.

    I like the MT system, but it does have its drawbacks.

    Peter smile
    •  
      CommentAuthorplindboe
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2012
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    2003 - Coronado - Ralf Wienrich


    What? Who?


    FalkirkBairn wrote
    What? Who? I hear you all cry.


    Oh yeah, that. shame

    I'll have to research this score.


    FalkirkBairn wrote
    Foreign films make a strong presence in 2003: Yann Tiersen's Goodbye Lenin!, Marcos Ciscar's Arn de Gothia (I can't imagine the film to which this score is attached), Held Der Gladiatoren (Carsten Rocker) and especially Michel Cusson's Séraphin: Un Homme et Son Péché all have great themes and music that are highlights for the year.


    I've heard Goodbye Lenin, but what are your favourite tracks from the other scores? I have a thing for great themes, and I'd like to check them out.


    FalkirkBairn wrote
    Thomas Newman's Angels In America has a great theme but I find the remaining score being not too memorable


    Agreed.


    Anyway, my 2003 winner is Gregson-Williams' Sinbad: Legend of the seven seas. Until How to train your dragon came along, this was my all-time favourite score for an animated movie. Fantastic themes, and there isn't a moment in this score I don't enjoy.

    Return of the king (Shore), The gospel of John (Danna) and The last samurai (Zimmer et al.) are absolutely fantastic as well.

    Other goodies I enjoy are Musashi (Morricone), Paycheck (Powell), Tears of the sun (Zimmer et al.), Children of Dune and the much villified Pirates of the Caribbean (Zimmer et al.).

    Oh, and just because the cue is so awesome, I feel I have to mention Powell's The new plan from The italian job.

    Peter punk
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2012
    Mine is predictable.

    THE LORD OF THE RINGS : THE RETURN OF THE KING

    With a special mention for Newman's Angels In America.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2012
    plindboe wrote
    The usual contributors are pure awesomeness though, and count for 10 normal contributors each.


    Well, THAT pretty much goes without saying!! biggrin

    While I can't comment one way or the other on Alan's choice, I'd say 2003 was a pretty good year.

    Aside from the scores already mentioned (Elfman's Hulk, Zimmer's Last Samurai, Goldenthal's S.W.A.T. -my favourite Goldenthal, hands down!- , Gregson-Williams' Sinbad, Legend Of The Seven Seas), all of which I enjoy greatly and play often, just the very cream of the crop includes some fantastic albums with massive replay value!

    Like John Powell's taut and fun The Italian Job as well as his breezy and lovely guitar driven Gigli, John Scott's powerful symphonic work on Odyssey Of The Belem , Brian Tyler's eclectic, but oh-so enjoyable guitar-horror spoof Bubba Ho-Tep, Christopher Young's electrifying jazz work on Shade, Beltrami's thunderous Terminator 3.

    On the video front there is on the one hand Giacchino seriously channeling the best of Williams action scores with Secret Weapons Over Normandy, and on the other what I consider Jesper Kyd's best score to date: the dark, ominous and pounding Freedom Fighters!

    Then my top 5 comes down to these
    5) Richard Harvey's richly dark Luther (the film is really bad by the way!)
    4) Edward Shearmur's best musical Bond pastiche yet: Johnny English
    3) Klaus Badelt's restrained rural sound for the very thoughtful score to Ned Kelly

    And then it comes down to power versus nostalgia.

    at number 2 it's Poledouris very last work ever: The Legend Of Butch And Cassidy, the theme to which is enough to propel it right to the top....if it weren't for ...
    1) Krzesimir Debski's Stara Basn, which is nothing so much as Conan for a new millennium.
    One of the very best and strongest works I have ever heard, evoking all the passion, heart, blood and guts that Poledouris' Conan succeeded at. So to me, as a massive Poledouris fan, it is no more than fitting to have this, relatively obscure Polish score (though not as obscure as certain German matinee film scores) at the top!
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  5. Thanks Martijn for the comments. Your top 2 have some cracking tracks on them.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2012
    Martijn wrote
    .if it weren't for ...
    1) Krzesimir Debski's Stara Basn,


    Come on! You just made that up. biggrin
    I am extremely serious.
  6. He did not, though I don't really like that score (and, actually, that composer, he'd be amazing if his pieces weren't so bitty and sounded as if the music editors didn't edit the album properly).
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2012
    Meh, what do YOU know about Polish composers?

    wink
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  7. Actually hardly anything, with all my experience of 16 years of listening to film music (yes, that much time), Polish composers never really grabbed my interest. I own Ogniem i mieczem (with the companion album, which is not so interesting) from Debski, I own Kilar's Pan Tadeusz (I used to own The Ninth Gate, but my primary school music teacher borrowed it from me and never gave it back), two Michal Lorenc score that I bought recently, another score for a fantasy film called The Witcher (based on classical Polish fantasy novel, tried the movie, God-awful, but the games seem to make a huge business outside of the country). And that's all I own from my country.
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
  8. plindboe wrote
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    Foreign films make a strong presence in 2003: Yann Tiersen's Goodbye Lenin!, Marcos Ciscar's Arn de Gothia (I can't imagine the film to which this score is attached), Held Der Gladiatoren (Carsten Rocker) and especially Michel Cusson's Séraphin: Un Homme et Son Péché all have great themes and music that are highlights for the year.


    I've heard Goodbye Lenin, but what are your favourite tracks from the other scores? I have a thing for great themes, and I'd like to check them out.

    From Arn de Gothia I'd recommend:
    "Arn de Gothia" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8IV9Z3vlDI
    "The Danish Threat" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rZ-PyXaYxc

    From Held Der Gladiatoren:
    "Requiem" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_ZoER3AZ8Q
    "Der Letzte Kampf"

    From Séraphin: Un Homme et Son Péché (A couple of videos with snatches of the score) :
    Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L264fNaEeqY
    Suite of cues: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsaOiDwg_Nc (~4:40 signals start of fabulous theme)
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
  9. It's funny but I have titles that have been mentioned by people for 2003 - The Missing & The Legend of Butch and Sundance - as 2004 titles. dizzy
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
  10. Interesting, The Missing is a 2003 movie, definitely.
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
  11. 2004 - Steamboy - Steve Jablonsky

    This year is a strong year in my book for more "mainstream" films/composers with Marco Beltrami in particular having a good year (more of that in a moment). But, 2004 is the year that Steve Jablonsky reached the height of his career (in its entirety or so far is still unknown). For me, Steamboy is a rip-roaring score and an exciting album that has very little in the way of slack moments. There's beautiful themes right from the outset - "Manchester 1866" - as well as exhausting action scoring ("The Chase") all in the first two cues! What I particularly like with this score is the way that Jablonsky builds the tension and excitement across the entire length of several of his tracks - "Ray's Dilemma" & "Launch!". "Collapse and Rescue", running to over 8 minutes is a huge track. There is maybe more than a hint of MediaVentures/Remote Control about this score but I don't find it over the top. A great score and one that consistently appears in my all-time top scores list.

    Running a close second are a group of titles that, for me, contain a couple of my favourite Marco Beltrami scores: Hellboy and I, Robot. Both, but particularly Hellboy, highlight Beltrami's ability to write aggressive (and interesting) action scoring as well as slower and more emotionally charged material. Thomas Newman's quirky and at times heartbreakingly beautiful Lemony Snicket's - A Series of Unfortunate Events and Shigeru Umebayashi's House of Flying Daggers are another couple of highlights.

    Mikael Carlsson's MovieScore Media label does a great job at highlighting several great scores from 2004: Michael Kamen's Back To Gaya, Gast Waltzing's George and The Dragon and Basil Poledouris' The Legend of Butch and Sundance (I am sticking with this being a 2004 title!) all showcase quality writing for films that, although not chosen as my top choice are very worthy scores to track down.

    Foreign films are also well represented in my favourite scores list for 2004. The popular Les Choristes (Bruno Coulais) is a lovely score that features several beautiful vocal tracks (around which the rest of the score is placed), Kiril Dzajkovski's score for the Macedonian drama The Great Water with it's mix of ethereal vocals and pounding rhythms linger long after the score has finished and Etienne Perruchon's choral-heavy music for the French documentary Dogora: Ouvrons Les Yeux (set in Cambodia) is a powerful listen (though quite Russian in tone). And composer Majid Entezami mixes traditional Iranian music with more Western styled instrumentation in the war drama Duel, providing an interesting and, at times, exciting musical journey.

    And a quick mention for Olivier Deriviere's score for the video game Obscure. I just love the creepy use of the human voice in this score.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
  12. PawelStroinski wrote
    Interesting, The Missing is a 2003 movie, definitely.

    I see that it is. I was getting confused with the 2003 US release and the 2004 UK release.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorplindboe
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    From Arn de Gothia I'd recommend:
    "Arn de Gothia" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8IV9Z3vlDI
    "The Danish Threat" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rZ-PyXaYxc

    From Held Der Gladiatoren:
    "Requiem" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_ZoER3AZ8Q
    "Der Letzte Kampf"

    From Séraphin: Un Homme et Son Péché (A couple of videos with snatches of the score) :
    Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L264fNaEeqY
    Suite of cues: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsaOiDwg_Nc (~4:40 signals start of fabulous theme)


    Great thanks! That's just what I need. I shall listen to them all carefully.


    FalkirkBairn wrote
    It's funny but I have titles that have been mentioned by people for 2003 - The Missing & The Legend of Butch and Sundance - as 2004 titles. dizzy


    I tend to go by imdb, because it goes into detail about release dates according to country, so it seems reliable. Anyway, it says The missing was first released in November 2003 in the US. It's true that it was 2004 in the UK, but I tend to go by the date it was first released no matter the country. The legend of Butch & Sundance was released in september 2006, so it seems you're both far off.

    Peter smile
    •  
      CommentAuthorFalkirkBairn
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012 edited
    Damn! My confidence in my entire list selections has been severely dented! wink
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
  13. I have just looked at when I started this thread. I can't believe that it has been over 2 years since it began. I can see why some are keen to have it finished!

    Not long now.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorplindboe
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    I like this thread, so don't want to see it end. It's inevitable though, unless you only update once every year, then it can go on forever.

    Peter wink
    •  
      CommentAuthorplindboe
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    Thor wrote
    Martijn wrote
    .if it weren't for ...
    1) Krzesimir Debski's Stara Basn,


    Come on! You just made that up. biggrin


    Well, it's no where near as good as Kalle Knutmortson's Hejsan allihopa or Frydenka Zbignorshephsky's Plimpa shinka.

    Peter smile