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      CommentAuthorplindboe
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2010
    Bregt wrote
    I once listened to Robin Hood a few times, but I never really got into it I'm afraid. I haven't heard Alexander Nevsky. I should, since it apparently is such a influential score?


    Bregt, do me a favour. Please watch this clip, and turn the volume up as high as possible. Play it more than just once. This is the most essential piece any film score fan should know, and I bet you won't regret dedicating a little time on it.

    It's fun to notice how dated the movie seems, and with modern eyes, the clip has plenty of unintentionally funny moments, concerning the body language of the people, but also notice how timeless the music is. This music could just as easily be composed for a movie today, and no one would dare to call it dated.

    I'd actually love to see this music to a big battle scene in a modern movie. I can't imagine anything cooler.

    Peter punk
  1. sdtom wrote
    A little bit of a heads up for 1939 although this isn't a worldwide list but Hollywood only.

    Thanks for the heads up, Tom. I do have to admit that I'm not familiar with a lot of these scores, but the one that I have chosen for 1939 highlights one of the "problems" of a favourites list: I have a lot of associated childhood memories of this score (as do the majority of people who've seen this over the years!)

    1939 - The Wizard of Oz - Herbert Stothart / Harold Arlen / Edgar Y Harburg

    There's so much more to the music for this film than just the iconic songs. For example, one of the things that has always stuck in my mind is Miss Gulch's theme. Immediately memorable! Listening to it again now, all the various themes/song melodies are weaved throughout the score to build to almost 2 hours that just flies by. Rhino Movie Music's 2-CD version can be a bit excessive with all the various alternate & partial takes but it's a loving reproduction of the score.

    Rhino Movie Music also produced a lavish release of another of this year's monumental scores - Gone With The Wind - but this one is just too full of American Civil War song references to be really enjoyable. A couple of titles that were serious contenders were Korngold's The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex (probably my favourite Korngold so far) and Alfred Newman's Wuthering Heights. Both contain great main themes - and I'd love to hear an expanded version of the Korngold title against the 14-minute suite of tracks from the Previn/LSO release (DG).
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    The Wizard of Oz was the winner over Wuthering Heights and Gone With The Wind. Next year will be an example of one of my early childhood favorites on the list. The Wizard was such a special movie and score.
    Thomas
    listen to more classical music!
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    Great choice, Alan.
    It would have been mine as well...for the exact same reason you already predicted:
    I have a lot of associated childhood memories of this score


    It's my dad's second favourite film (the first one being The Thief Of Bagdad, which naturally has become a personal favourite of mine as well, having watched it dozens of times). But aside from that, the songs and incidental music really are very good (and some of the lyrics are incredibly clever! You'd bleep over it in all the goings-on, but having examined them in some more detail (while trying to work out a chord arrangement for guitar) I really gained some major appreciation for the lyricist!

    A close second would be (perhaps surprisingly) Victor Young's lovely work on Fleischer's animated Gulliver's Travels. But again, this is mainly due to some very good childhood memories. The songs, while lovely, are nowhere near as good as the Wizard's, but the incidental music is top notch.

    If the question was which I think was the better score it'd be a toss-up between Steiner's Gone With The Wind and Newman's Hunchback Of The Notre Dame, which are both outstanding.
    But neither is a favourite of mine.

    Any thoughts on the best score of this very fruitful year, Alan?
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  2. Martijn wrote
    Any thoughts on the best score of this very fruitful year, Alan?

    Best? Well, I'm not familiar with either Gulliver's Travels nor Hunchback of Notre Dame and the remainder of the scores I am familiar with doesn't amount to very many. AND I'm not very familiar with many of the movies so any assessment of the best score within the movie is something I can't really say.

    But as listening experiences Newman's Wuthering Heights does seem to be quite a varied score that fits in well with what I remember of the story. Steiner's integration of the aforementioned Civil War-influenced tunes in Gone With The Wind is also a worthy achievement.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    My pick for 1939 would definitely be ELIZABETH & ESSEX. It truly shines in the lovely suite format on the Carl Davis rerecording.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorFalkirkBairn
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010 edited
    Thor wrote
    My pick for 1939 would definitely be ELIZABETH & ESSEX. It truly shines in the lovely suite format on the Carl Davis rerecording.

    I see this version is the complete score arranged in 6 suites. BTW, is the Bay Cities release the same as the Varese release? (Same track titles & same track lengths as far as I can see.)

    Would anyone have a breakdown of what each suite contains?...Doesn't matter, I see that the Varese release has sub-headings for each track listed. I may listen to this complete version - and I may change my 1939 entry if it lives up to the quality of the selection of tracks I already have.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    Thor wrote
    My pick for 1939 would definitely be ELIZABETH & ESSEX. It truly shines in the lovely suite format on the Carl Davis rerecording.

    I see this version is the complete score arranged in 6 suites. BTW, is the Bay Cities release the same as the Varese release? (Same track titles & same track lengths as far as I can see.)

    Would anyone have a breakdown of what each suite contains?...Doesn't matter, I see that the Varese release has sub-headings for each track listed. I may listen to this complete version - and I may change my 1939 entry if it lives up to the quality of the selection of tracks I already have.


    I don't know if it's complete or not, but it's rearranged in such a way to provide a nice flow from "segment" to "segment". I have the Bay Cities release, and don't know whether it's any different from the Varese.
    I am extremely serious.
  3. I've just checked and the Varese release features the Munich Symphony Orchestra conducted by Carl Davis. It seems to be the same as the Bay Cities version. And it is a complete recording.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    Pinocchio (1940) - Leigh Harline; Paul J. Smith (III); Ned Washington

    Other Nominees:
    Arizona (1940) - Victor Young (I)
    Dark Command (1940) - Victor Young (I)
    My Favorite Wife (1940) - Roy Webb (I)
    North West Mounted Police (1940) - Victor Young (I)
    One Million B.C. (1940) - Werner R. Heymann
    Our Town (1940) - Aaron Copland
    Rebecca (1940) - Franz Waxman
    The Fight for Life (1940) - Louis Gruenberg
    The Great Dictator (1940) - Meredith Willson
    The House of the Seven Gables (1940) - Frank Skinner (I)
    The Howards of Virginia (1940) - Richard Hageman
    The Letter (1940) - Max Steiner (I)
    The Long Voyage Home (1940) - Richard Hageman
    The Mark of Zorro (1940) - Alfred Newman
    The Thief of Bagdad (1940) - Miklós Rózsa
    Waterloo Bridge (1940) - Herbert Stothart

    The list for 1940 in the USA releases
    Thomas
    listen to more classical music!
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      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010 edited
    Snow White's a whore.



    But don't tell anyone.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    uhm

    What?
    D., are you ouzo-happy? Or still jetlagged?
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    I believe Martijn's choice will coincide with mine on 1940. wink
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    Timmer wrote
    I believe Martijn's choice will coincide with mine on 1940. wink


    Why, I do believe that it might. smile
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    Martijn wrote
    uhm

    What?
    D., are you ouzo-happy? Or still jetlagged?


    No, no, the effects of easter drinking, eating and well, alcohol in particular should have left my system by now, erm, shouldn't they? confused dizzy wink

    But seriously, come on. 7 guys? uhm
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    Randy dwarves!? dizzy shocked
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    Timmer wrote
    Randy dwarves!? dizzy shocked


    Sounds like the latest member of RC. slant

    (we're messing up Alan's thread againnnn.... angry )
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    Christodoulides wrote
    Snow White's a whore.



    But don't tell anyone.


    This sort of stuff doesn't belong in THIS thread. Stop hijacking Alan's thread. Please for the love of God be respectful to what Alan is doing here and take the shenanigans (yes, I said shenanigans) elsewhere.

    angry

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
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      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    Another one who fell in love with Snow white as a child? wink

    OK.I'll shut it.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    sdtom wrote
    <big list>


    Tom, what's with the (III) and (I)?
    Is that an indication for Oscar nomination or something?
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010 edited
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    I've just checked and the Varese release features the Munich Symphony Orchestra conducted by Carl Davis. It seems to be the same as the Bay Cities version. And it is a complete recording.


    It's a very, very good recording and one of the Korngold's I actually enjoy.
    That said, Korngold not being a favourite of mine, I'd not place it above any of the other choices of 1939.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  4. Martijn wrote
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    I've just checked and the Varese release features the Munich Symphony Orchestra conducted by Carl Davis. It seems to be the same as the Bay Cities version. And it is a complete recording.


    It's a very, very good recording and one of the Korngold's I actually enjoy.
    That said, Korngold not being a favourite of mine, I'd not place it above any of the other choices of 1939.

    I've just picked up a copy of this and I'm looking forward to hearing it in full. It's not going to replace The Wizard of Oz though.

    1940 up later...
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    It's not going to replace The Wizard of Oz though.


    punk

    (I am actually slightly relieved dizzy )
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  5. I've got to make you feel good just in case my 1940 choice doesn't agree! wink
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeApr 7th 2010
    Uh oh...
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  6. 1940 - The Sea Hawk - Erich Wolfgang Korngold

    The breadth of this score was obvious when Naxos/Stromberg/Moscow Symphony Orchestra released this back in 2007. This has to be my favourite swashbuckling theme and kicks off 2+ hours worth of excellent film music. But, it's a title that doesn't seem to feature in Tom's list - though I see it was nominated in 1941 as best score (losing out to, as Tom mentions, Pinocchio).

    This score does contain all the typical Korngold excesses seen in his scores to date. But this one seems to get the balance right, mixing in the swashbuckling style with a lot more variety (at least to my ears anyway) - the drama of tracks such as "The Big Drum" and lovely tracks such as "Rose Garden".

    This choice replaces Rozsa's The Thief of Bagdad: listening again to the couple of versions I have, it just doesn't grab me in the same way as it did before.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2010
    shocked
    This...is ...wrong. For so many reasons.
    angry

    I just...need some time to cope with this.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  7. biggrin
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2010 edited
    My favourite Korngold score. Introduced it to a couple of my friends after they heard it in Family Guy:

    http://fliiby.com/file/51818/dnpbna3ia1.html

    38 seconds in

    biggrin
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      CommentAuthorplindboe
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2010
    My choice would have been The thief of Bagdad. But The sea hawk is pretty good as well.

    Peter punk