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  1. There were some real gems in 2004.

    Mark McKenzie's BLIZZARD is fantastic. JNH's THE VILLAGE is one of his best. Mark Isham's RACING STRIPES is really good, especially "The Big Race," which is probably my favorite piece by Isham. I love JNH's theme and finale for HIDALGO, and I also quite enjoy FINDING NEVERLAND. I'm pretty sure this was the year that the Yo-Yo Ma/Ennio Morricone compilation came out. It's wonderful, and though obviously not a 2004 score, it still gets a shoutout.

    My favorite score from 2004 is the wonderful and very beautiful LADIES IN LAVENDER by Nigel Hess. Anyone that likes beautiful melody at all should really check this one out. I love it! And thanks again to Erik for highlighting it on his show. I never would have heard it otherwise.

    I've heard nothing but good about STEAMBOY. I actually saw the film, just for the score, and thought they were both pretty good. The film was a little long, but otherwise very entertaining. The score was great in the film and has been on my short list of things to get for a while (it's kind of a long short list...)
  2. I bought the DVD so I could hear the score in the film. I agree that the film is overly long - I think that the DVD is longer than the original film. But it is worth watching for Jablonsky's score.

    I have been trying to do a track-by-track "analysis" on this score. But it has been sat unfinished for several years.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    Hey, a 2004 entry so soon! Cool.

    I actually like some of Jablonsky's music -- especially TRANSFORMERS, which I keep coming back to. I don't think I've heard STEAMBOY properly, although I may have seen the film at some point.

    For me, 2004 wasn't all that impressive, but my favourite top 3 were absolutely stunning. I've saved the top favourite for the end, but the other two I mention first in my usual honourable mentions: HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN (John Williams), THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST (John Debney), THE TERMINAL (John Williams), NATIONAL TREASURE (Trevor Rabin), THE BOURNE SUPREMACY (John Powell), ALEXANDER (Vangelis),
    FLIGHT OF THE PHOENIX (Marco Beltrami), THE POLAR EXPRESS (Alan Silvestri -- although the film was sappy crap).

    But the winner is one of my most listened-to scores in the last couple of years, and also what is IMO one of the Top 10 best scores for synths/electronics:

    CRASH (Mark Isham)
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    plindboe wrote
    I tend to go by imdb, because it goes into detail about release dates according to country, so it seems reliable. Anyway, it says The missing was first released in November 2003 in the US. It's true that it was 2004 in the UK, but I tend to go by the date it was first released no matter the country. The legend of Butch & Sundance was released in september 2006, so it seems you're both far off.


    If you go by IMDB, yes.
    But I always take my information from the actual cd booklets or covers, and THAT says 2003.
    There is a drawback there as well of course, as it's not consistently used (sometimes it's the year of composition, sometimes that of recording, sometimes that of issue, re-issue or even rights renewal!).

    So whatever year you take, there is bound to be some clutter on the line.
    At the end it's just another preference, I guess?
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    Martijn wrote
    Meh, what do YOU know about Polish composers?

    wink
    PawelStroinski wrote
    Actually hardly anything, with all my experience of 16 years of listening to film music (yes, that much time), Polish composers never really grabbed my interest.


    shocked

    What IS it with you balkan(-ish_ types!
    I tried a converation with Krisztina about Goran Bregovic, and she didn't like him either!
    Inverted (or even anti-)nationalism gone astray, I say. sad
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  3. Goran Bregovic isn't Hungarian though.

    One thing that impairs my listening is the heavy regular praise that goes to the level beyond any sensibility from one member on a Polish forum, that I don't like, because of the way he states his views and tends to offend another composer.

    Well, yeah, my forum is a "nice" thing sometimes... Someone who I've been in conflict for two years now tried to publicly suggest there that I had sex with Hans Zimmer, because I don't allow any personal attacks on him on our board...
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012 edited
    PawelStroinski wrote
    Well, yeah, my forum is a "nice" thing sometimes... Someone who I've been in conflict for two years now tried to publicly suggest there that I had sex with Hans Zimmer, because I don't allow any personal attacks on him on our board...


    That's nothing to be embarrassed about. Remember, I like to suck John Williams' d__k! wink

    Sorry - That was inappropriate. shame

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012 edited
    PawelStroinski wrote
    Goran Bregovic isn't Hungarian though.


    I didn't say Hungarian! I said Balkan! wink


    Anyway, so: 2004, hmmm...some OK scores there.

    Steamboy doesn't come out on top for me, although it's a very enjoyable score.
    I rate your choices Hellboy and I, Robot both over it (Hellboy edging out overall, although to me the theme to I, Robot is the better one!

    To get it out of the way (as you already gave the title a nod as well), my uncontested winner for 2004 is Shigeru Umebayashi's exquisite House of Flying Daggers.
    Its overall fairytale quality (that SO well supports the beautiful film) and its fragile theme never fail to move me deeply. I should even go so far as to say that it's my single most favourite oriental score ever: well balanced, lyrical, exciting when needed, introspective where called for.
    It's just one phenomenal score.

    But, aside from the usual suspects already mentioned (The Village, Passion Of The Christ, George And The Dragon, The Bourne Supremacy), I'd like to draw attention to a couple of really good scores from that year.

    First of all, before my top 5 (well, the four remaining), a couple of nods to some really good TV work:
    - Sean Callery's 24 is surprisingly good: exciting and tight throughout, and a great adrenalin-filled listen.
    - I like Yuki kajiura's work on the anime series Madlax, there are some fine, thematic and guitar driven tracks, some weird rocky Japanese songs...overall an interesting and diverse (if not very coherent) listen.
    - Jeff Beal's Carnivále is, admittedly, an acquired taste, with its odd and unsettling combination of Ry Cooder-ish semi-folk style and instruments, working to an eerie quality that supported the (unfortunately aborted series) so VERY well.

    On the game score front Giacchino and Tilton delivered a fine action-oriented (but very melodic and enjoyable) orchestral score again with Mercenaries: Playground of Destruction, although (oddly maybe?) I prefer Richard Jacques Headhunter: Redemption which in all its electronic splendour seems to convey a better sense of urgency.
    But towering waaaaay over any of them is Jack Wall's thunderously epic Wrath Unleashed, which just pretty much unleaseshed the forces of heaven and hell in humongous sound. Great stuff!

    For films, George Fenton's Stage Beauty has some truly lovely themes (but unfortunately is too long, overall), and there are some good tracks in Revell's Chronicles Of Riddick (but it too is too long).
    Alan Silvestri's Van Helsing delivers the goods in the action department, and is still a fun listen (though the concept of "subtlety" has been gracelessly and violently flung off the parapet). Hans Zimmer's King Arthur pretty much goes the same way, but is enjoyable enough nonetheless.

    Morricone's Fateless is subdued but on CD delivers a very satisfying and quiet listen.

    And then there's one of the most uneven scores to one of the oddest films I have seen: Blueberry. The film for the better part is basically one long visual transcription of a peyote trip. The score, like the film, is overly ambitious and pretentious, and I would dismiss it entirely but for the eclectic theme, which actually is suprisingly effective, and really good!

    So, now then for the rest of my top 5:

    5) Sky Captain And The World Of Tomorrow by Edward Shearmur is not without flaws (for one: it again is too long), but delivers a great hommage and sense of matinee viewing, with action and style galore!
    4) Gabriel Yared's rejected score to Troy has in the last year had its detractors. To them I say PTUIH ! This visceral, pounding and powerful work blows Horner's replacement right into Scylla and Charybdis!
    3) The Incredibles by Michael Giacchino is such a fine and enjoyable score. Clearly made with the greatest love and sense of fun, and it shows throughout. One of the finest Barry hommages I have ever heard, and a fantastic standalone experience. To my mind Giacchino's best work by far!
    And it would have easily been number two on my list, had it not been for
    2) Rolfe Kent's Sideways.
    Yes. How surprising is that? Small scale jazzy stylings and rhythms for an introspective mood create one of my favourite CDs! It succeeds unbelievably well in creating a sense of quiet kindness with an ever so slight sense of melancholy. A perfect listen for a summery Sunday morning.
    A very good film as well starring the (I think) rather underestimated Paul Giamatti.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012 edited
    2004 was really the last GREAT year for film music. It seemed like one great score after another was being released from Beltrami's greatest score ever to HELLBOY to John Debney's strongest dramatic score of his career for THE PASSION OF THE CHRIST. Silvestri wrote his last true great film score for THE POLAR EXPRESS, Giacchino became a household name with THE INCREDIBLES, Elfman scored SPIDER-MAN 2, which, IMO, is one of the greatest comic book films of all time, Williams wrote the greatest Harry Potter score for PRISONER OF AZKABAN, Yared's rejected score to TROY became arguably the greatest rejected score of all time, Mark Isham wrote one of the great sports scores of all time for MIRACLE, David Arnold's unreleased THE STEPFORD WIVES is a delight, Desplat wrote my favorite score of his for BIRTH, Chris Tilton wrote a massive action score for the video game MERCENARIES with a main theme supplied by Michael Giacchino and James Newton Howard was still in fine form with HIDALGO.

    But the best score of the year is what I like to call a modern day classic - Edward Shearmur's SKY CAPTAIN AND THE WORLD OF TOMORROW. A brilliant throw back to the 70's, 80's John Williams action adventure scores with a secondary motif written for Frankie and her Manta Squadron that is to die for!

    PS - Blizzard was a 2003 film.
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    I'd like to see a fight between Graeme Revell and Edward Shearmur over who's SKY CAPTAIN AND THE WORLD OF TOMORROW is the best? biggrin wink
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
  4. Why Graeme Revell?
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    Ugh. slant Corrected.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    lol
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    That being said, I would have loved to hear Revell's take on SKY CAPTAIN. Now there's a film that cried for a gritty, ambient soundscape!! wink
    I am extremely serious.
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    Martijn wrote
    Ugh. slant Corrected.


    At least it shows I read each and every post wink hug
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012 edited
    If you want to hear Revell in action/adventure mode look no further than TITAN A.E., which is in desperate need of an official CD release. The opening cue is a stunner!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012 edited
    Erik Woods wrote
    If you want to hear Revell in action/adventure mode look no further than TITAN A.E., which is in desperate need of an official CD release. The opening cue is a stunner!

    -Erik-


    I was just being facetious earlier. Revell can do anything, and he's one of my favourites. Love stuff like RED PLANET, THE CROW, DEAD CALM (release the score already!), STRANGE DAYS. And stuff like LARA CROFT, TITAN AE or the RIDDICK films show his capability in the more 'mainstream' action adventure mode, as you say.
    I am extremely serious.
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    I agree with Erik that this was a fabulous year for film music, looking at everyones favourites makes me realise I bought a lot of CD's that year. Anyway, rather than lists loads that I liked here are my top three favourites....

    1/ THE BOURNE SUPREMACY - John Powell

    My very favourite Powell score and amongst one of my most played CD's.

    2/ HELLBOY - Marco Beltrami

    Excellent score to a very good film.

    3/ SIDEWAYS - Rolfe Kent

    Spot on Martijn! Great film and a great score, a superb stand alone album.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
  5. Erik Woods wrote
    PS - Blizzard was a 2003 film.


    Noooooooooooo!

    I hate it when that happens. It's still a great score!
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    plindboe wrote
    I like this thread, so don't want to see it end. It's inevitable though, unless you only update once every year, then it can go on forever.

    Peter wink


    I'm lurking in the shadows waiting for it to be completed so I can get started.
    tom
    listen to more classical music!
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    sdtom wrote
    I'm lurking in the shadows waiting for it to be completed so I can get started.
    tom


    biggrin I can just picture it, Tom!
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  6. sdtom wrote
    plindboe wrote
    I like this thread, so don't want to see it end. It's inevitable though, unless you only update once every year, then it can go on forever.

    Peter wink


    I'm lurking in the shadows waiting for it to be completed so I can get started.
    tom

    I admire your patience!
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    As far as 2004 is concerned I feel like I'm from another planet. This was a Newman year for me all the way. Finding Nemo and Seabiscuit.
    Tom
    listen to more classical music!
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2012
    sdtom wrote
    As far as 2004 is concerned I feel like I'm from another planet. This was a Newman year for me all the way. Finding Nemo and Seabiscuit.
    Tom


    Both 2003 films.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJun 23rd 2012
    They were Oscar nominated for 2004 but made in 2003.
    listen to more classical music!
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 23rd 2012
    Hence they are 2003 films.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJun 24th 2012
    only the shadow knows
    listen to more classical music!
    •  
      CommentAuthorplindboe
    • CommentTimeJun 26th 2012 edited
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    plindboe wrote
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    Foreign films make a strong presence in 2003: Yann Tiersen's Goodbye Lenin!, Marcos Ciscar's Arn de Gothia (I can't imagine the film to which this score is attached), Held Der Gladiatoren (Carsten Rocker) and especially Michel Cusson's Séraphin: Un Homme et Son Péché all have great themes and music that are highlights for the year.


    I've heard Goodbye Lenin, but what are your favourite tracks from the other scores? I have a thing for great themes, and I'd like to check them out.

    From Arn de Gothia I'd recommend:
    "Arn de Gothia" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8IV9Z3vlDI
    "The Danish Threat" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rZ-PyXaYxc

    From Held Der Gladiatoren:
    "Requiem" - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_ZoER3AZ8Q
    "Der Letzte Kampf"

    From Séraphin: Un Homme et Son Péché (A couple of videos with snatches of the score) :
    Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L264fNaEeqY
    Suite of cues: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsaOiDwg_Nc (~4:40 signals start of fabulous theme)


    Great stuff! The Held one is a goodie.

    omgs, that theme from Seraphin I knew already! I had downloaded it a while ago, and had no idea where it was from. It was just called Reverie. I love that piece, and have been looking for the composer and score for a long time.

    Btw, Alan, I think you will like the group called Secret Garden. That Reverie theme is pure Secret Garden.

    Peter smile
  7. Thanks for the feedback! I do have some Secret Garden, but just their well-known stuff.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorplindboe
    • CommentTimeJun 30th 2012
    Cool, Alan. If you're interested in some SG recommendations, I highly recommend that you get their first three albums, Songs from a Secret Garden, White stones and Dawn of a new century. All of these are filled with amazing tracks. The albums Once in a Red Moon, Earthsongs and Winter Poem are less good, but still very listenable. The album Inside I'm Singing is the most atrocious album you will ever hear, even if you were to live a thousand years, so avoid that by whatever means necessary.

    Peter smile