• Categories

Vanilla 1.1.4 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

 
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2010
    http://www.empireonline.com/news/story.asp?NID=29332
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
    • CommentAuthorAnthony
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2010
    Somebody's been playing video games too much.

    Cheesy name, but looking forward to the movie and score after the very enjoyable third film.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2010
    MOdern Games philosophy is injecting itself everywhere in all the media these days, especially films and film music.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2010
    LAME!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2010
    Never purchased or played a video game other than Scrabble and Chess. Somehow in my life I don't think I'm missing very much at all.
    Thomas
    listen to more classical music!
    •  
      CommentAuthorBregt
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2010
    biggrin
    Kazoo
  1. Odd title. Sounds more like a videogame than a film.
  2. don't care about the title, I care about it being directed by Brad Bird punk
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2010
    ... which is quite a risk. Great story teller but this is his first live action film.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  3. His first live action project didn't get money. What was it called 1906?
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
  4. Erik Woods wrote
    ... which is quite a risk. Great story teller but this is his first live action film.

    -Erik-


    I think it's sad we live in a world where it's suddenly "quite a risk" for a talented and proven fantastic storyteller to do something different from his or her previous work. No offense, Erik, but I absolutely hate the internet nerd/fanboy sentiment of "Well (insert actor/director/composer) has only made Y type movies, therefore he's going to ruin Z movie because it'll be like all his Y movies."
    •  
      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2010
    One thing is for sure. Nobody could make a movie worse than the last Mission: Impossible film.
  5. I tell you what is a shame... that such a storyteller as this one has to make a Mission:Impossible film to get a live action movie made. It will probably serve him in the long run, but it's a step up for the series, and a step down for him.
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2010
    ^
    Well said that man.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2010 edited
    christilton wrote
    Erik Woods wrote
    ... which is quite a risk. Great story teller but this is his first live action film.

    -Erik-


    I think it's sad we live in a world where it's suddenly "quite a risk" for a talented and proven fantastic storyteller to do something different from his or her previous work. No offense, Erik, but I absolutely hate the internet nerd/fanboy sentiment of "Well (insert actor/director/composer) has only made Y type movies, therefore he's going to ruin Z movie because it'll be like all his Y movies."


    Did I say he was going to ruin the movie? I just said it was a risk. Yes, he has proven to be quite the animator. He tells awesome stories but what's his track record in the live action medium? He now has to work with actors on live sets and not just in a recording booth! He has to create a movie in a foreign environment. Yes, this is waaaaaaay out of his comfort zone. And this is not just a director going from one genre to the next. From working solely in the animation to the live-action medium.... that's quite a leap. I hope he knocks this one out of the park... I really do... but it's still a risk.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2010
    Well, what to do; people need more money wink
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
    • CommentAuthorchristilton
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2010 edited
    Erik Woods wrote

    Did I say he was going to ruin the movie? I just said it was a risk. Yes, he has proven to be quite the animator. He tells awesome stories but what's his track record in the live action medium? He now has to work with actors on live sets and not just in a recording booth! He has to create a movie in a foreign environment. Yes, this is waaaaaaay out of his comfort zone. And this is not just a director going from one genre to the next. From working solely in the animation to the live-action medium.... that's quite a leap. I hope he knocks this one out of the park... I really do... but it's still a risk.

    -Erik-


    I was generalizing with the "ruin the movie" comment. I didn't mean you specifically said that about it. In any case, how do you know what is or isn't out of Brad's comfort zone? Do you know him personally? You also call him an animator, he's not an animator, he's a director. And he directs animated films very much how you would direct a movie, it just so happens that a lot of it is in a virtual space. James Cameron had never really directed actors in an entirely green screen environment for Avatar, but I'd never made the assumption that it was risky to have him do that. Michael never scored a horror film before, but it certainly wasn't risky for him to score Let Me In. JJ Abrams had never directed a movie before, but it certainly wasn't risky for him to direct MI3. My point is, you don't know what talents or skills these people have shown or proven to the people that are hiring them.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2010 edited
    Well, for Let Me In i'd say he was not much in his comfort zone either, judging by the outcome wink
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
  6. Christodoulides wrote
    Well, for Let Me In i'd say he was not much in his comfort zone either, judging by the outcome wink


    Well Michael enjoyed scoring the film, and everyone was really happy with the outcome, so you are wrong. Whether or not you personally liked the score is irrelevant.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2010 edited
    I am sure he did; and people around him too otherwise it would get rejected and replaced before release, so yeah, thanks for the obvious.

    Well, all it's subjective when it comes to music Mr.Tilton. It's all about opinions; obviously the people involved with the film might have a more direct and perhaps 'valuable' opinion to others involved in the film as well, but that can't render anyone else's opinions right or wrong. In the end, i am part of the reviewing and buying public and it's me who's going to decide whether to go watch a movie, or buy a score CD or not.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
  7. Christodoulides wrote
    I am sure he did; and people around him too otherwise it would get rejected and replaced before release, so yeah, thanks for the obvious.

    Well, all it's subjective when it comes to music Mr.Tilton. It's all about opinions; obviously the people involved with the film might have a more direct and perhaps 'valuable' opinion to others involved in the film as well, but that can't render anyone else's opinions right or wrong. In the end, i am part of the reviewing and buying public and it's me who's going to decide whether to go watch a movie, or buy a score CD or not.


    Well I'm not talking about the subjective opinions of music/movies and whether or not you like them. That has nothing to do with the discussion. I'm talking about Erik saying it was a big risk, as if it was some sort of unequivocal fact, with absolutely no evidence of the sort to back it up other than his own personal outside opinion. He's certainly welcome to be pessimistic, cautious, or curious about the project. It's just a pet peeve of mine when the reasoning is solely because they are tackling a genre/medium/etc that they haven't previously done, regardless of the clear talent involved.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2010 edited
    christilton wrote
    In any case, how do you know what is or isn't out of Brad's comfort zone? Do you know him personally?


    No, that's an obversation. He hasn't done a live action film. I'm sure it's going to be quite intimidating for him to be on set. But maybe it's not. Maybe this is what he has wanted to do his whole life and animation was his ticket to get into live action film. In any case, it's a different world for him but I'm sure he has surrounded himself with the right people that will help him get through the process and create a solid movie.

    christilton wrote
    You also call him an animator, he's not an animator, he's a director. And he directs animated films very much how you would direct a movie, it just so happens that a lot of it is in a virtual space.


    Oh for Christ sakes, Chris. Yes he is an animator. He also is a director, producer, etc.

    christilton wrote
    James Cameron had never really directed actors in an entirely green screen environment for Avatar, but I'd never made the assumption that it was risky to have him do that.


    The guy in a special effects specialist. He has directed some of the most impressive and well received special effects heavy films of all time. Avatar was most definitely in his comfort zone!

    christilton wrote
    Michael never scored a horror film before, but it certainly wasn't risky for him to score Let Me In.


    That's totally different and you know it!

    christilton wrote
    JJ Abrams had never directed a movie before, but it certainly wasn't risky for him to direct MI3.


    JJ Abrams has a history of writing and directing for TV which is where directors cut their teeth in the industry. It wasn't risky for his first film as a feature director to be M:I 3 because of his experience with Alias and I'm glad M:I3 turned into the success it was. I can't say that it was a great film but I'm glad he came out of it the way he did and is able to continue on and create more successful films and realize his dreams! I hope for nothing but the same for Brad Bird.

    christilton wrote
    It's just a pet peeve of mine when the reasoning is solely because they are tackling a genre/medium/etc that they haven't previously done, regardless of the clear talent involved.


    Here you have a guy who as never been behind the camera to directed a live action film (if he has please tell me which one it was) and you don't call that risky? I'm being honest when I ask this because you know a hell of a lot more than I do, Chris, when it comes down to insider stuff... has Bird done some live action directing on the side... short films, TV, etc.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!


  8. Here you have a guy who as never been behind the camera to directed a live action film (if he has please tell me which one it was) and you don't call that risky? I'm being honest when I ask this because you know a hell of a lot more than I do, Chris, when it comes down to insider stuff... has Bird done some live action directing on the side... short films, TV, etc.

    -Erik-


    Well when he directs animation, he's still speaking the same language as live action. What types of lenses to use, shot composition, where to put the camera, the "actors," storyboarding complicated action sequences, just like you would do for a live action movie. You said it better when you said it'll be interesting. Risky? If he went to do this after coming off Iron Giant, sure, but not at this point in his career.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2010
    Fair enough, Chris.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  9. christilton wrote
    JJ Abrams had never directed a movie before, but it certainly wasn't risky for him to direct MI3.


    While I take your point about people's skills, I'm not sure the final product that is Mi3 quite bears out your optimism in this case. wink


    [David Mamet's On Directing Film starts by praising classic Disney animators as some of the greatest filmmakers that ever lived. Because they could draw anything they wanted, but they found an economy for storytelling that their live action cousins could learn from. ]
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
  10. Hmm, I'd read the Mamet book.
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
  11. DUMBO is his case in point.
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am