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  1. Looking at his list of credits Spielberg hasn't really directed much (of any quality?) since the mid-2000s. I'm not so sure that he's such the big draw that he used to be. With the older (and loyal fan-base) audience the name may mean something, but perhaps with the younger audiences he's not such a big name.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeMay 18th 2011
    Spielberg's name is still a draw!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
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      CommentAuthorBobdH
    • CommentTimeMay 18th 2011 edited
    I think Spielberg has done enough timeless films that contain characters that are still enormous icons to remain a draw for many years to come. There are new generations still learning about Indiana Jones and Jurassic Park.

    It's also why Steven Spielberg films are never presented like "from the director of...", of "from the people that brought you...". His name says it all. So...

    Erik Woods wrote
    And in the full theatrical trailer I'm sure you will see a credit like "From the people who brought you Indiana Jones and The Lord of the Rings comes..."


    ...no, I don't think they will mention it. King Kong also was 'A Peter Jackson film', instead of 'from the director of The Lord of the Rings'. He's in that league already.
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeMay 18th 2011
    Erik Woods wrote
    Spielberg's name is still a draw!

    -Erik-


    It certainly is. I have no great interest in seeing either Tintin or The War Horse though (especially the latter, which sounds dire) - and if you'd asked me when I was 12 (or probably 22!) what the chances were of Steven Spielberg ever making a film and me not seeing it, I'd have said nil!
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeMay 18th 2011
    Thor wrote
    Southall wrote
    Thor wrote
    Agreeed. ALthough I DID like the SW preques.


    Anyone in any doubt as to how much you've been enjoying your national day need read no further than this!


    He, he....you mean because of the typos or because I like the prequels?


    The former. I love the prequels (scores) too.
  2. I said Kong wasn´t the hit it deserved to be. Or could have been, IF Jackson as a name would be the big seller. Compared to Kong, how much money made each of the LotR movies, not even mentioning the countless awards they have actually won? And I firmly believe that Kong is totally up there with the last two Rings movies, qualitywise (Fellowship is easily Jackson´s best movie). It should have been a massive hit, and that it certainly wasn´t. Jackson´s name will help, but not enough.

    But we can compare apples and oranges until we´re bleeding. Just take a look at the movie message boards and see for yourself how many people are just too stupid to give Tintin a chance.

    It might not count for anything in the end, as I said before. I´m just saying it´s a risky project.
  3. The risk of it has occurred to me too. It could rule the roost, as Erik suggests. It could also be a bit of an odd thing out there that a lot of people without an attachment to the brand don't know if they want to see. I'm not particularly interested to see it myself, but that's because I was always more of an Asterix comic fan than a Tintin fan when I was young. (I don't think I ever really *got* Tintin.)
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
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      CommentAuthorBobdH
    • CommentTimeMay 18th 2011 edited
    Projects are called 'risky' too easy these days. Everything that's not a sequel, prequel, reboot or based on a popular comic (or: one with a chore audience even before it's released) is 'risky'. I'd say an adventure film for the whole family as directed by Steven Spielberg and produced by Peter Jackson with the techniques of Avatar isn't in the least bit risky. Let alone one that's based on a comic that proved popular in Europe already. Worst case scenario: it isn't an instant smash hit. Which translates in modern speak to 'failure'. Ridiculous, if you ask me.
  4. Funnily enough, I think this one fits the bill of being based on a popular comic. wink

    If you want to defend original works that should get made, ... hmmm... I don't know, things like Scorsese's SILENCE seem like more likely candidates. (Although even that's now getting made.)
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
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      CommentAuthorRalph Kruhm
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2011 edited
    This movie isn´t Avatar. There´s no mash-up of real cinematography and CGI, real people and CGI people. And it´s neither SF nor Fantasy. It´s the adaptation of a fifty (or more) years old detective story with the look and (hopefully!) mood of a fifty years old detective story, plus some adventurous elements. People like us (film music geeks), who I consider to be a bit more interested in the "arts" than the standard audience, will definitely look at Tintin in a different way than your typical 21st century kid or teenager would. I would be really surprised if an audience brandmarked by fast driven, action-oriented boomblasting movies will "get" what Tintin is about.

    Risky, yes, in a manner of speaking. I didn´t mean it in a "it will bomb everywhere" sense, because I still believe it will be (at least) massive in Europe. But I can´t see anyone else (besides Cameron or one or two other people) who would have had a chance to get this specific project made. I think Jackson & Spielberg as a "name trademark" were good for making it. But they will need a lot more than just their names to advertise it.
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      CommentAuthorArtworks
    • CommentTimeMay 19th 2011
    I'm really looking forward to this movie... AND John Williams' score, of course. I, like many others, read the Tintin comics as a kid (and loved them), and the first movie I ever watched in a cinema, was a Tintin movie... so you can say that they are messing with me childhood memories here smile But I really like the visual style of the new movie, and I think it looks rather true to the original (or as true as you can make it, when you are going for a "photo realistic" look smile).
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2011
    Just came back from the film! Loved it. More thoughts coming when I've digested it.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorArtworks
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2011
    Cool. I'm gonna see it monday, hope it's good.
  5. Me and bro are going tomorrow and I KNOW it'll be good.

    Plus I'm already thoroughly enjoying the score, though most people here seem not to ... shocked
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2011 edited
    DreamTheater wrote
    Me and bro are going tomorrow and I KNOW it'll be good.

    Plus I'm already thoroughly enjoying the score, though most people here seem not to ... shocked


    I love what I've heard of the score (both in and out of the film), but will await further comments untill the CD is in the mailbox.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2011
    Haaaa! So looking forward to this!
    Probably next weekend. This weekend is chocfull with the Leiden Film Festival and a Halloween Marathon, so I was pretty booked.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  6. I'm angry because the film is going to be released here in January.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2011
    yonythemoony wrote
    I'm angry because the film is going to be released here in January.


    shocked

    Yikes. And I thought Norway was always late in getting films.
    I am extremely serious.
    • CommentAuthorAnthony
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2011
    Because Americans aren't familiar with Tintin, the studio hopes the hype will have been carried across the sea by the time they release it in December.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2011
    Anthony wrote
    Because Americans aren't familiar with Tintin, the studio hopes the hype will have been carried across the sea by the time they release it in December.


    Kind of opposite of what it usually is, then. Strange, because even though the comic book may be more famous here, there's still enough American superstars behind the camera to make it a feasible selling point over there.
    I am extremely serious.
  7. It's Spielberg and Peter Jackson. It will do well here. I had never even heard of Tintin before I knew that Spielberg was directing it. I know nothing about the source material, but I've been excited to see it for months.
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      CommentAuthorBobdH
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2011
    When I was in New York, I was surprised people were hardly excited about Tintin, or at least reactions were a very mixed bag. I spoke to someone who predicted Tintin will not do well in America, because Tintin had "Nazi leanings", and she could not be convinced otherwise. I'm still hoping people will be lured in because of the comparisons with Indiana Jones.
  8. yonythemoony wrote
    I'm angry because the film is going to be released here in January.


    for once you know how it feels to see a movie later than the rest of us. I think I speak for a lot of people here that we usually have to wait months to see a movie that was already released months ago in the USA

    I know it sucks, but you'll see it eventually smile
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
    • CommentAuthorAnthony
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2011
    Thor wrote
    Anthony wrote
    Because Americans aren't familiar with Tintin, the studio hopes the hype will have been carried across the sea by the time they release it in December.


    Kind of opposite of what it usually is, then. Strange, because even though the comic book may be more famous here, there's still enough American superstars behind the camera to make it a feasible selling point over there.


    Actually pretty much everyone in it is English.
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      CommentAuthorBregt
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2011
    BobdH wrote
    When I was in New York, I was surprised people were hardly excited about Tintin, or at least reactions were a very mixed bag. I spoke to someone who predicted Tintin will not do well in America, because Tintin had "Nazi leanings", and she could not be convinced otherwise. I'm still hoping people will be lured in because of the comparisons with Indiana Jones.

    Does Tintin have Nazi leanings??? uhm

    Saw the film yesterday evening and it was loads of fun, quite a bit tongue-in-cheek and with many references to the books (the main titles are a "recognize the comic" montage). There are a few really exciting scenes (arriving at the desert, the motorcade race in the town and the dream sequences). It's also a very fast paced movie without any place for rest. Well done!

    Seeing back all those legendary characters was very entertaining. Jansen and Janssen, Biancafore, and especially Haddock put a smile on my face, well done! The music was a bit all over the place, but Snowy's theme and the Unicorn's theme are the most memorable, especially the former. Not one of Williams' best, but entertaining.

    I loved Tintin when I was a child and read them all. It surely is not a great film, but for fans there's a lot to it that brings back memories (at least for me) and as a hommage to Hergé, it's worth going.
    Kazoo
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2011
    Anthony wrote
    Thor wrote
    Anthony wrote
    Because Americans aren't familiar with Tintin, the studio hopes the hype will have been carried across the sea by the time they release it in December.


    Kind of opposite of what it usually is, then. Strange, because even though the comic book may be more famous here, there's still enough American superstars behind the camera to make it a feasible selling point over there.


    Actually pretty much everyone in it is English.


    Spielberg, Williams, Kahn, Kennedy...the same American team that has given us many classics over the years.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2011 edited
    Bregt wrote
    BobdH wrote
    When I was in New York, I was surprised people were hardly excited about Tintin, or at least reactions were a very mixed bag. I spoke to someone who predicted Tintin will not do well in America, because Tintin had "Nazi leanings", and she could not be convinced otherwise. I'm still hoping people will be lured in because of the comparisons with Indiana Jones.

    Does Tintin have Nazi leanings??? uhm


    No.
    Classic uninformed Chinese whispers.

    Hergé, Tintin's creator, was accused of collaboration with the enemy because he had continued working during the war.
    And indeed reading some of his output during occupation time, you can see he certainly complied to Nazi rule (De Geheimzinnige Ster ("The Mysterious Star") features an American and very obvious Jewish banker as the bad guy).

    It's been held against Hergé for some time, but he was never convicted in the end (also because so many artists continued their work, adhering to the rule of the German occupier. They had to eat. And of course it was only after the war that everyone was suddenly a war hero and had Great Moral Principles for everyone who was clearly not.)

    Tintin, the character, NEVER displayed any Nazi traits.
    He was a product of his time -the thirties and forties, with the racial and social sensibilities of those days.
    But that is as far as it goes.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorBregt
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2011
    Sigh. Rumours and wrong interpretations. There's many surrounding Hergé.

    rolleyes
    Kazoo
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2011 edited
    Well, it's certainly true that Hergé was quite right wing leaning in his thinking (just read 'Tintin In The Soviet Union'), but aside from that and the aforementioned Jewish banker, I really couldn't find any strong poltitical statements in any of the albums.

    And again aside from 'Tintin In The Soviet Union', Tintin himself has always remained utterly neutral and impartial.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn