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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2021
    NP: TWISTED (Hallucinogen)

    This pioneering 1996 album is one of the cornerstones of psytrance. Much "cleaner" in sound than, say, Infected Mushroom or Juno Reactor.
    I am extremely serious.
  1. Thor wrote
    ... Much "cleaner" in sound than, say, Infected Mushroom or Juno Reactor.

    I was just thinking that myself.

    wink
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeApr 30th 2021
    NP: WINDOWS IN THE JUNGLE (10CC)

    This 1983 album is the latest one I own of 10CC (I own 8 in total), and it's obviously not on par with their earlier albums. But it's still Godley/Creme goodness without that actual dynamic duo, IMO.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorLSH
    • CommentTimeMay 1st 2021
    Thor wrote
    NP: WINDOWS IN THE JUNGLE (10CC)

    This 1983 album is the latest one I own of 10CC (I own 8 in total), and it's obviously not on par with their earlier albums. But it's still Godley/Creme goodness without that actual dynamic duo, IMO.


    I like this post.
  2. Howard Skempton - Lento

    Great piece, very mystical in a Vaughan-Williams/The Thin Red Line kind of way.
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMay 10th 2021
    NP: INNOVISIONS (Giorgio Moroder)

    Sometimes, I'm a sucker for these super-produced 80s pop hits. Album includes frequent Moroder collaborators Joe Esposito and Paul Engemann (of SCARFACE fame). Also includes Sylvester Levay and Harold Faltermeyer among the personell, so it's all pretty starstudded. Moroder is kinda unrecognizable on the cover, methinks (his moustache-free period).
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMay 16th 2021
    NP: TALKING BOOK (Stevie Wonder)

    I think I might prefer this over the much-revered SONGS IN THE KEY OF LIFE. Something about the Hohner clavinet that gets me every time.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMay 18th 2021 edited
    NP: DARK SKY ISLAND (Enya)

    So far her last album (it's from 2015), but it's all very classic her. Need some soothing music to start off the work week (yesterday was our constitution day).
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMay 20th 2021
    NP: RARITIES (Eric Woolfson)

    Some rare Woolfson songs I've collected over the years (most of them pre-APP). Great stuff! There's still a lifetime of searching involved to find all of the songs he penned over the years. I've been in touch with his daughter Sally, and even she doesn't have total overview of his entire output.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeSep 7th 2021
    NP: AMAZONIA (Jean Michel Jarre)

    Still need to get this on CD; it's a wonderful ambient album/sonic experience -- one of his best in years.
    I am extremely serious.
  3. Thor wrote
    NP: AMAZONIA (Jean Michel Jarre)

    Still need to get this on CD; it's a wonderful ambient album/sonic experience -- one of his best in years.

    It's interesting to read this compared with several of the entertaing Amazon store reviews.

    Personally, I don't like his predominantly effects-ridden ambient efforts and much prefer his more in-your-face catchy tune efforts. And, even then, that's no guarantee that I will like it.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeSep 7th 2021
    I like both.
    I am extremely serious.
  4. Thor wrote
    I like both.

    I like some.

    I really like the ambience of the final track on his WAITING FOR COUSTEAU album - so much so that we used it as a soothing background when Anne was in labour waiting to have a baby.

    But there's a lot that needs to be right for me to like something. Things like the quality of the sound palette used, how are the various elements used, etc..

    It's similar to my likes and dislikes in film music. I don't have a blanket love for a composer. I need to hear what they do project to project. But, that's true for most people, I suppose.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2021 edited
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    I really like the ambience of the final track on his WAITING FOR COUSTEAU album - so much so that we used it as a soothing background when Anne was in labour waiting to have a baby.


    Fantastic track, especially the longer 40+ minute one. Got it on LP from my uncle for a Christmas or birthday (he's never given me a more tailormade gift before or since), which I then subsequently copied to cassette. I didn't use it for anything as dramatic as a pregnancy, but created a whole storyline/short story in my head as I listened to it. Sort of an abstract mental journey through different exotic locales.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2021 edited
    NP: BLUE ALBUM (Orbital)

    When all is said and done, this remains my favourite Orbital album. "Acid Plant" is a surely a tribute to The Sparks' "The Rhythm Thief", released two years earlier?
    I am extremely serious.
  5. Just played: ABBA Voyage

    Fantastic they are back, a really good album. Jet they sound exactly like 1983, which ich find at the same time impressive and a tad disappointing.

    Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
  6. Captain Future wrote
    Just played: ABBA Voyage

    Fantastic they are back, a really good album. Jet they sound exactly like 1983, which ich find at the same time impressive and a tad disappointing.

    Volker

    I think that your divided thoughts are reflected in the spread of the reviews I have been seeing: some think it's great because it's like the 'old ABBA' and others don't like it because it's like the 'old ABBA.'
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeNov 7th 2021 edited
    I disagree that it sounds like ABBA in 1983 (1981, to be exact). It's more a regression to their dancey, singalong 70s. THE VISITORS -- their masterpiece -- displayed a whole other maturity and other level of experimentalism. From lush synths to curious chord changes to ethereal soundscapes. It was really pointing towards CHESS more than anything. If this new album had been anything like that, or built on the sound they "left on" in the early 80s, I would have been all over it in terms of enthusiasm.

    As it stands, however, VOYAGE isn't that. It's still a fine album -- I like the more reflective cues, for example. But a new THE VISITORS, it's not. Neither in sound nor quality.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMar 25th 2022
    NP: 20 YEARS OF... (Jethro Tull)

    Some personal context: Back in the early 90s, the start of my formative years, I was finding my musical love of prog rock. My dad had the STANDING UP vinyl, with the funny pop-up sleeve, and this prompted me to check out Jethro Tull as a contender. I picked up this compilation CD in the local record store, and have loved them ever since. However, my physical collection does not mirror my love of them, as I only have this and the STANDING UP album on CD all these years later. While I've heard a great deal more, and I always intended to grow my collection, I never got around to picking up more. And these days, with everything available online on streaming platforms etc., it's difficult to muster up the energy to do so.
    I am extremely serious.
  7. That's the thing. Why would anyone need to buy any music again?

    I was thinking about this the other day about my film music CD collection. At the start there was those who measured their experience of film music by the size of their collection. And there was the thrill of having a rarity.

    Nowadays there is no physical representation of the extent of everyone's film music experience. Everyone's potential listening opportunities are limited only by the streaming services catalogue.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
  8. I feel you Alan. I'm much more likely to do just "surface" listens now on streaming, and moving on quickly if it doesn't grab me immediately. But when I used to make a selective choice on what new CD album to purchase - I think I really savored the listening experience more and took the time to really appreciate what the composer was trying to do with repeat listens and digging deeper into it. I've had many albums become better and more enjoyable over time that I may have not looked back at after the first listen had it just been a streaming format that I could move on from so quickly. Silvestri's Ready Player One was one of those for me. I remember when I first heard it, I really didn't connect with it right away, it seemed a bit all over the place - but owning the CD album, I kept listening, absorbing and enjoying it every next time I heard it. And now it's a highlight of my Silvestri collection.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2022
    I once made a playlist of READY PLAYER ONE (of some 30-40 minutes, I think) that worked reasonably well for me, but alas it got lost when my harddrives crashed a few years back, and I never got around to recreating it. So I haven't played it very much since (the 85-minute release is overkill, and not very tempting to play).

    But yes - the "ritual" of putting something on, physically, allows for a certain closness to the music that streaming or digital files don't.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeApr 15th 2022
    NP: SPRÜNGE (Herbert Grönemeyer)

    I have a long back story about this (and Grönemeyer's 4630 BOCHUM), but I won't bore you with it.
    I am extremely serious.
  9. Stop fishing. wink
  10. Thor wrote
    NP: SPRÜNGE (Herbert Grönemeyer)

    I have a long back story about this (and Grönemeyer's 4630 BOCHUM), but I won't bore you with it.


    This! My sister owned that album (Bochum) on cassette. An original cassette actually. We played it to death!

    Cheers! Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeApr 16th 2022 edited
    Indeed. And nice to see you around, Volker.

    It wasn't intended as 'fishing', but what the hell. It's a cute story.

    Back in the 80s, my parents knew a German couple (they were neighbours at our summer place in Denmark which Bregt and Kaat have actually visited). One summer in the late 80s, when I was 10 or so, we went to visit them in Hamburg. They had two boys, a bit older than me. This was before I learned German in school, but I picked up certain phrases, or created them myself based on random words. One of them was "Volkswagen Geschmack", which translates as "Volkswagen taste". The German family found this hilarious, and a couple of years later, the boys gave me a cassette that they had made -- complete with a homemade cover that said "Volkswagen Geschmack" and had pasted-in cut-outs of a car and some dishes. On the cassette were the two Grönemeyer albums in question - SPRÜNGE and BOCHUM.

    Like you, I listened to them to death. I still have the cassette in my basement storage somewhere. What's interesting is that I later discovered Grönemeyer wasn't only an actor as well, he also dabbled in film music now and then (still does, I think). So I guess in a way it was a foreshadowing.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2022
    NP: GREAT SONGS OF LOVE AND FAITH (Mahalia Jackson)

    Gospel with a twist. This is a fantastic album from 1962, with beautiful arrangements by (presumably) John Williams, who also conducts. Jackson's voice is big and wide, but never so elaborate that it gets in the way of the melody. But everytime I hear Tiomkin's eternal "The Green Leaves of Summer", I'm reminded of a cue I "composed" on the piano as a kid, that is VERY similar (I had not heard "Green Leaves" at the time, so I guess is speaks to the simplicity of the tune).
    I am extremely serious.