• Categories

Vanilla 1.1.4 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

 
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJul 18th 2012
    Hmm....I thought I recorded with wav and then compressed to mp3 afterwards. At least that's what my settings said. Then again, I'm a noob in these things, so what do I know. I'll investigate further.
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJul 18th 2012
    Save as a WAV. Then import that WAV in iTunes. Tag the WAV file using iTunes. Then convert the WAV file down to whatever it is you use want to listen to in iTunes (mp3, acc, aiff, Apple Lossless, etc.) After the encoding is finished, delete the WAV file from iTunes and from your hard drive (unless you want to keep the WAV file for future encodings or back-up.)

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  1. Like I said, mine was automatically set to mono. If you want, I can take screen grabs, to help you since yours is in another language.
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2012
    justin boggan wrote
    Like I said, mine was automatically set to mono. If you want, I can take screen grabs, to help you since yours is in another language.


    Thanks, but I think I got it sorted out now with just activating the internal sound card. I had wanted a slightly higher resolution than 128 kbps, but that's apparently impossible. So it's doable the way is now.
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2012
    It's not impossible. Do what I said above!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2012
    Erik Woods wrote
    It's not impossible. Do what I said above!

    -Erik-


    Saving as wav after you've recorded the piece doesn't help. The quality is 'created' while you record the piece itself.
    I am extremely serious.
  2. In Audacity, isn't it possible to choose WAV as the starting format? confused
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
    • CommentAuthorJoshL
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2012
    Okay, a basic primer in computer audio:
    There are three basic numbers to be aware of: the bits-per-sample, the sample rate and, with compressed audio, the compression bit rate. The sample rate tells you how fast the data is streaming, the bits-per-sample (or bit-depth) tells you how much information is coming across with each sample. Compression bit rate is what it sounds like...how much information per-second you are stripping the audio down to. Sample rate will give you the audio spectrum that you can hear, the bit-depth will give you the dynamic range, and the compression rate will affect quality from there.

    So then, a cd has a sample rate of 44.1khz (the rate should double the maximum value, so a cd can reproduce frequencies up to 22.05khz, and humans can hear up to 20khz. There's more to it than that, but you get the idea) and a bit-depth of 16-bit. That works out to about 96db of dynamic range (the quietest sound to the loudest). 24-bit, by the by, gives you around 144db. A cd is uncompressed, so it will not have a compression bit rate.

    A .wav file works the same way. I tend to record at 24/48khz, and downsample if I need to (always better to downsample than upsample). 128kps is the compression bit rate, so it is not relevant to a .wav file. Taking a look at Audacity's online manual (http://manual.audacityteam.org/help/man … tions.html) you should have the options to change the bitrate when you export to an .mp3 By the looks of it, you ARE recording in .wav format. You can look at the track control panel (http://manual.audacityteam.org/help/man … racks.html) to see what you're recording at (in this case, it's 32/44.1khz). These can be changed in the "quality" tab of the preferences menu (http://manual.audacityteam.org/help/man … ences.html).

    And this is where your sound card comes into play. You can't set the sample rate to 192khz if your sound card doesn't support it. Likewise, the bit depth. Play with this, and if you aren't getting what you want, take a screenshot and we'll see if we can't help you optimize it a little better! If it is your sound card, I'm not sure what's good, consumer level (and you probably don't want to sink $500 into the card I use!).

    Anyway, babble. Summary: you are recording in .wav. You should be able to export to .mp3 at a decent bitrate, but if not, saving the .wav and converting in another program will get you good results.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2012
    DreamTheater wrote
    In Audacity, isn't it possible to choose WAV as the starting format? confused


    Not that I'm aware of. It records what it records and then you can choose file name afterwards (mp3, wav, whatever). I've been trying to look into the source recording settings, but haven't a found a way to change it.
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2012
    Thor - When you are recording you aren't encoding. After a recording is finished you have a RAW file. When you save/export your recording is when the encoding begins.

    After recording you have a RAW uncompressed file. When you want to save that file out click FILE>EXPORT. A new window will open and you have a truck load of opinion to choose from including FORMAT (MP3, OGG, WAVE, etc) and OPTIONS as to what bit rate you want to export the file out as.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2012
    Erik Woods wrote
    Thor - When you are recording you aren't encoding. After a recording is finished you have a RAW file. When you save/export your recording is when the encoding begins.

    After recording you have a RAW uncompressed file. When you want to save that file out click FILE>EXPORT. A new window will open and you have a truck load of opinion to choose from including FORMAT (MP3, OGG, WAVE, etc) and OPTIONS as to what bit rate you want to export the file out as.

    -Erik-


    Yeah, I know. It's just that when I playback the 'raw' file, as you call it, directly in Audacity after it has finished, the quality sounds lesser than the actual video it was recorded from. Which makes me think there's some kind of compression going on even as it's recording. But maybe my ears are playing tricks on me.
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2012 edited
    Have you checked the QUALITY settings in preferences? What are your default settings?

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2012
    Erik Woods wrote
    Have you checked the QUALITY settings in preferences? What are your default settings?

    -Erik-


    Highest possible on all levels.
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2012
    I actually want to know the details. Sample rate, Sample format, etc.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2012
    Erik Woods wrote
    I actually want to know the details. Sample rate, Sample format, etc.

    -Erik-


    Well, it's mostly in Norwegian, but here you go:

    Datarate:

    Standard datarate: 96000 Hz
    Standard datapunktformat: 32-bit Float

    Real-time conversion:

    Datarate converter: Sinc-interpolation, High Quality
    Utjevning: None

    High Quality Conversion:

    Datarate converter: Sinc-interpolation, High Quality
    Ujevning: Formet
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJul 22nd 2012
    Try 44100hz as your sample rate!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJul 22nd 2012
    OK. Justin said 96000 earlier, so I assumed that was the best.
    I am extremely serious.
  3. That's just how I have mine at -- do as you please. I found anything lower than that didn't sound like it was orignally -- there was a reduction in sound quality.
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJul 22nd 2012
    CD quality is 44100Hz 16 bit stereo. That's all you need.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  4. Thor, again, all I can say is the difference was quite apparent. Make one at both rates, from a score cue, and compare it to the original cue.
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.