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      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeSep 23rd 2012 edited
    ...which is a brilliant Brit flick If you haven't seen it, a 2011 production.

    Is now scoring the latest Alfonso Cuaron's movie.

    http://filmmusicreporter.com/2012/09/22 … s-gravity/

    Solaris echoes anyone? smile
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
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      CommentAuthorBobdH
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2013 edited
    The 1st of October the score to GRAVITY will be released from Watertower Music. You can see the cover and tracklisting and listen to clips over at their official website:

    http://www.watertower-music.com/release … h=WTM39478

    Seems to be a largely electronic score with lots of soundscaping, but also some organic elements like a female vocal, piano and violin/cello.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2013
    Yeah, sounds like it's something up my alley.

    I had forgotten Price did ATTACK OF THE BLOCK too. Loved that film, although I can't remember much of the score.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2013
    I was kinda hoping that Gravity would have no score whatsoever.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
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      CommentAuthorBobdH
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2013 edited
    Me too, with only a few Pärt tracks, like the trailer! A bit how Cauron handled music in Children of Men.

    But let's see how this score-thing works out.
  1. My review of GRAVITY, for anyone who is interested:

    http://moviemusicuk.us/2013/10/08/gravity-steven-price/

    Jon
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2013
    Nice review, Jon. I was really impressed with this score.
  2. A thoughtful review Jon. smile
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeDec 7th 2013
  3. Are we going to get rid of "the guy from attack the block" in this thread's title anytime soon? tongue
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeDec 7th 2013
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2013 edited
    Overrated! moon
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
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      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2013
    Score? Definitely overrated. Only the 2 cues, "Shenzou" and "Gravity" , have something different to suggest, imo.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
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      CommentAuthorBregt
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2013 edited
    Really? It's also one of my favourites this year. Quite spectacular music.
    Kazoo
  4. Demetris wrote
    Score? Definitely overrated. Only the 2 cues, "Shenzou" and "Gravity" , have something different to suggest, imo.

    Huh? Those two cues are the most traditional and least "different" aspects of the score! dizzy
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      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2013
    The rest is sound design. Effective or not, it's not the matter; But this further marks an era when sound design is nowadays considered music. Would a distinct motif, not a grand and distracting theme or anything unfitting like that, but a musically meaningful motif (even one note) harm anyone? Look at what Martinez did with the vastly superior score for Solaris.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
  5. Actually, there are recurring motifs in Gravity, done by the synths (the danger/action motif, foreshadowed by the first track, some motifs for the more soothing, almost Brian Eno-like calming scenes...).
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
  6. PawelStroinski wrote
    Actually, there are recurring motifs in Gravity, done by the synths (the danger/action motif, foreshadowed by the first track, some motifs for the more soothing, almost Brian Eno-like calming scenes...).

    yeah
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      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2013
    Yeah if you hear it a thousand times and over-analyze the sound design to try and find music in there; now, "Shenzou" and "Gravity" on the other way feel like the only 2 places where they let the composer actually write music; might not be as genuine or fresh as he could write, but still very good pieces.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
  7. Hmm, didn't you notice that the idea behind the synth motif at the beginning of Gravity and throughout the whole Debris is not too far from the idea behind Why So Serious?
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
  8. Demetris wrote
    Yeah if you hear it a thousand times and over-analyze the sound design to try and find music in there; now, "Shenzou" and "Gravity" on the other way feel like the only 2 places where they let the composer actually write music; might not be as genuine or fresh as he could write, but still very good pieces.


    I don't think Price suffered from restictions here. Far from it!

    I disagree with your "hear it a thousand times" comment. Many 'modern' orchestral works are very difficult to follow, yet we'd all agree they are music. Don't dismiss "Gravity" as being sounddesign just because it happens to be scored for lots of synth sounds.

    Example: Is "Lux Aeterna" by Ligeti music or sound design? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnuAaKiX1sg). I'd expect most people to wholeheartedly say that this is music, not sounddesign. But honest to god, to me that cue is much more difficult and inaccessible than anything on Price's "Gravity".

    <s>
    www.synchrotones.wordpress.com | www.synchrotones.co.uk | @Synchrotones | facebook | soundcloud | youtube
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2013 edited
    Demetris wrote
    Yeah if you hear it a thousand times and over-analyze the sound design to try and find music in there; now, "Shenzou" and "Gravity" on the other way feel like the only 2 places where they let the composer actually write music; might not be as genuine or fresh as he could write, but still very good pieces.


    3 or 4 times, not a thousand? Personally I feel that there's so much derivative, easily digestible, uncreative stuff out there that having to listen to something a few times to figure it out is a refreshing and pleasant experience. But I have not heard this particular score so I don't know that its not as bad as you say.
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2013
    Demetris wrote
    The rest is sound design. Effective or not, it's not the matter; But this further marks an era when sound design is nowadays considered music.


    You might want to listen to this one again. Music it most certainly is.
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2013 edited
    It is music... it's creative music for sure... but I don't think it does anything much different than any other standard suspense score. And the finale music is so overly simple and plain musically that I don't understand how something like this gets such rave reviews.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  9. Erik Woods wrote
    It is music... it's creative music for sure... but I don't think it does anything much different than any other standard suspense score. And the finale music is so overly simple and plain musically that I don't understand how something like this gets such rave reviews.

    -Erik-

    Maybe it was just the relief of having something so plainly musical to listen to that garnered such rave reviews for the final tracks?
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
  10. FalkirkBairn wrote
    Erik Woods wrote
    It is music... it's creative music for sure... but I don't think it does anything much different than any other standard suspense score. And the finale music is so overly simple and plain musically that I don't understand how something like this gets such rave reviews.

    -Erik-

    Maybe it was just the relief of having something so plainly musical to listen to that garnered such rave reviews for the final tracks?

    Yeah, I think Alan's nailed it. I think what Price did well was transitioning from the difficult sound design to the more traditional stuff at the end. You can really hear the two sides of the equation battling it out in "Tiengong" and "Shenzou," and then the more humanistic/emotional side eventually wins out in "Gravity." Taken on its own that cue is nothing special (though quite stirring and enjoyable, in an almost Two Steps From Hell kind of way), but it feels like a relief, which considering the film seems like a an appropriate emotional response to go for in that situation!

    I'm not sure I'd write a rave review of this particular score either but I find myself "understanding" it much better than I usually do challenging/sound-design scores.
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2013
    I understand the process of how the score came together I just think musically it's not all that interesting. It's rather generic, especially the finale cue, and the suspense music is rather standard as well. Again, very effective but nothing I want to spin anytime soon.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  11. Southall wrote
    Demetris wrote
    The rest is sound design. Effective or not, it's not the matter; But this further marks an era when sound design is nowadays considered music.


    You might want to listen to this one again. Music it most certainly is.


    Indeed.

    I'm not sure comparing it to SOLARIS is a great idea either. That's basically comparing a supernatural/romantic drama to an action film, despite the fact that both have sci-fi trappings. CAPTAIN PHILLIPS is a better comparison, really, for this film's primary genre. While the opposition in that film is all tribal polyrhythms and exotic electric cello motifs, in this one it's a pile of musical debris, scattered to all channels, lacking the musical equivalent of a horizon line. In those moments where characters gain clarity of goal, the music focuses in very clearly to a particular train of thought.

    Like a lot of great sci-fi scores... Artemiev's SOLARIS, Vangelis' BLADE RUNNER, Goldsmith's ALIEN, Goldsmith's LOGAN'S RUN, the infamous FANTASTIC VOYAGE score, even the use of Ligeti in 2001 ... it's almost borderline sound design at times. That's a consistent strategy that runs through sci-fi scoring as a way to represent the 'otherness' or the 'infinite' of what else might be out there. (Even Herrmann's theremin, before it was a trope, was an experimental idea that had never been tried before.) So I'm not sure the 'sound design' thing is much of a criticism. So much of music is designed sound anyway.

    I think like Southall half my appreciation goes to the fact that it's a score that actually contributes to narrative shape. There don't seem to be so many of those these days.
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
  12. Erik Woods wrote
    I understand the process of how the score came together I just think musically it's not all that interesting. It's rather generic, especially the finale cue, and the suspense music is rather standard as well. Again, very effective but nothing I want to spin anytime soon.

    Agreed with your last sentence, it's more a score to admire than enjoy. But I'm failing to see how the suspense music is "standard" or "generic." It certainly doesn't sound much like anything I've ever heard before!
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeDec 9th 2013 edited
    Low growls, brass bursts, pounding electronics, screeching, dissonent strings, etc. Meh! At times I thought I was hearing an early 80's Horner urban thriller score... without the drum loops and steel drums. wink It also has a heavy Zimmer/MV influence. Nothing new to see here... move along, move along.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!