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  1. NR: Krise und Untergang der Römischen Republik (Crisis and Downfall of the Roman Republik) - Karl Christ. Just a few pages left, the battle of Aktium is ahead.

    I just finished reading A Prayer for Owen Meany - John Irving. The fourth or fifth novel by that author I have read. I find his writing addictive.

    With my 12 graders I am reading Thomas Mann.
    And with my 7 grade philosophers I will read The Hunger Games. In German of course.

    What are you reading?

    Volker
    "Did you see anything out there?" - "No. Why? What happened?" - "The ship just got herpes."
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2013 edited
    As per usual I'm reading several dozens of books at the same time (I don't have ADD! I don'oh look at the cute kittycat!).
    But mainly I'm reading Proust's lovely Swann's Way (From À La Recherche Du Temps Perdu. No, not in French, although I would've liked to. But I don't trust my command of French that much), Selected Stories of O'Henry (one of the first writers to employ the modern "twist in the tail" form), Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals by Immanuel Kant (the bloke could do with actually ending a paragraph at some point. I haven't read sentences like these since I read Caesar!) and Roberto Bolaño's mystifying but intriguing meganovel 2666.

    And besides that I'm reading the entire run of Detective Comics from the sixties and seventies and every single comic series by Garth Ennis I can find.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2013
    Crikey! That much at once?

    Actually, having said that I usually have multiple reads on the go, as long as it's, like yours, very differing.


    I have 2666 but haven't touched it yet.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2013
    Timmer wrote
    Crikey! That much at once?


    Yeah. shame

    In a similar vein that's why I need my iPod Classic.
    The very idea of NOT having the wide range of choices that 160 GB yields (which is still FAR insufficient for my needs, but hey-ho) is abhorrent to me.

    I want to be able to pick up what I want whenever I feel like it. dizzy
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorBregt
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2013 edited
    I find it impressive on how much you all read! I like reading but it takes its time, usually about three or four weeks for a book. How do you do it?
    Kazoo
  2. Waclaw Potocki's Moralia - for my PhD thesis (it's saved for now). It's a very long poetic work (a collection of poems) that is very interesting even if the guy can get tedious, I find that somehow enticing and maybe even a bit charming.

    Max Scheler's Wesen und Formen der Sympathie. Polish translation (I trust my command of German probably less than Martijn trusts his French). On the train to and fro work/university. I like philosophy and since I read some of his anthropological works, I find Scheler very interesting. I also took a big liking in Georg Simmel and William James recently. I intend to read the latter's Principles of Psychology, especially after his Pragmatism, which is a fantastic work. Ralph Waldo Emerson isn't too shabby either. Scheler makes some interesting points, especially that during the time of writing the particular work he was a theist, then he backed off somehow, but that I'd have to read up on.

    Max Scheler heavily influenced the philosophical work of John Paul II when he was a university professor (and either a bishop or already a cardinal) on the Catholic University in Lublin.

    Arthur C. Clarke's A Space Odyssey series. Also Polish translations. I bought a bundle that is basically the whole four parts in one book. Now I'm on 2010. I read that in my leisure time in my own free time, when I have it. Great, great stuff. It's not my first venture into hard SF (I read Lem's Solaris on my fourth university year and I loved it), but one of the first. I'd love to read Rendezvous with Rama (or even the whole series) in English.
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2013 edited
    Bregt wrote
    I find it impressive on how much you all read! I like reading but it takes its time, usually about three or four weeks for a book. How do you do it?


    smile I take far longer on my books, Bregt, mainly because I'm reading so many at a time.
    Plus I tend to listen to a LOT of audio dramas at night (which often takes the place of reading).

    Used to be I read 3-4 books a week in my younger years (we're now roughly referencing years from before the time of the French Revolution. slant ), but no more: I cannot find the time, much as I'd like to.
    The price of growing up.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2013
    PawelStroinski wrote
    Waclaw Potocki's Moralia - for my PhD thesis (it's saved for now).


    punk beer
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2013
    Yeah, I used to read at least a couple of books a week. I still read a lot, but not that much any more (sadly). I think it's one of life's great pleasures.
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeApr 18th 2013
    Captain Future wrote
    And with my 7 grade philosophers I will read The Hunger Games. In German of course.


    You haven't experienced The Hunger Games until you've read it in the original Klingon.
  3. Southall wrote
    Captain Future wrote
    And with my 7 grade philosophers I will read The Hunger Games. In German of course.


    You haven't experienced The Hunger Games until you've read it in the original Klingon.


    cheesy
    "Did you see anything out there?" - "No. Why? What happened?" - "The ship just got herpes."
  4. Martijn wrote
    As per usual I'm reading several dozens of books at the same time (I don't have ADD! I don'oh look at the cute kittycat!).
    But mainly I'm reading Proust's lovely Swann's Way (From À La Recherche Du Temps Perdu. No, not in French, although I would've liked to. But I don't trust my command of French that much), Selected Stories of O'Henry (one of the first writers to employ the modern "twist in the tail" form), Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals by Immanuel Kant (the bloke could do with actually ending a paragraph at some point. I haven't read sentences like these since I read Caesar!) and Roberto Bolaño's mystifying but intriguing meganovel 2666.

    And besides that I'm reading the entire run of Detective Comics from the sixties and seventies and every single comic series by Garth Ennis I can find.


    As a student I found Kant's prose terrible. Then I read Hegel ... crazy

    wink Volker
    "Did you see anything out there?" - "No. Why? What happened?" - "The ship just got herpes."
    •  
      CommentAuthorBregt
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2013
    Southall wrote
    Yeah, I used to read at least a couple of books a week.

    shocked

    Martijn wrote
    PawelStroinski wrote
    Waclaw Potocki's Moralia - for my PhD thesis (it's saved for now).


    punk beer

    I second that! smile
    Kazoo
    •  
      CommentAuthorBregje
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2013
    Hello everybody, I am reading for school mostly but after next week I'll have two weeks off! Yippee. That means: reading, drawing, music and more.
    smile

    Right now I am reading Humanistic Education by Nimrod Aloni and Education and Humanism by Wiel Veugelers and some Freire, for school obviously. Exam next week.

    I also started reading Stil de tijd by Joke Hermsen (essays on time) but I will finish it in my weeks off. I also have a book about childern's book's illustrators and I read a chapter every once in a while.
    •  
      CommentAuthorBobdH
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2013 edited
    Martijn wrote
    (...) and Roberto Bolaño's mystifying but intriguing meganovel 2666.


    Oeh, quite interested to hear your thoughts on it when you finish. Reviewers love it, I thought it intriguing but not the brilliant work of fiction people made it out to be, even a bit pretentious, my mother put it aside after a couple hundred pages... Opinions vary. Don't judge it until you've finished it all. Is this your first Bolaño?

    On topic; I read about 1 novel a month, but this varies greatly on the size and type of novel. I can read a 300 page novel in a week, and am currently reading Edward Rutherfurd's 1200 page London which traces the origins of the city back to the very first settlers through the fictitious lives of a few families and their grand-, grand-, grand-, grandchildren. This might take me a lot less time than it took me to read Dostoyevski's The Idiot (approx. 700 pages) which just reads a lot slower and needs more concentration. Recently read Dante's Divine Comedy in about 3 weeks. Loved it.

    I do read only one novel at a time.
    Procrastinate now. Don't put it off.
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2014
    Reading a book on the life and times Tchaikovsky. Very very enlightning. I've learned a whole lot about him that I never knew.
    Tom
    listen to more classical music!
  5. Reading "Surface Detail" by Ian M. Banks

    Very good!
    "Did you see anything out there?" - "No. Why? What happened?" - "The ship just got herpes."
  6. Currently reading and comparing and writing a paper about Red Harvest (Dashiell Hammett) and The Big Sleep (Raymond Chandler). As much as I dearly wish I didn't have to do the paper (just a few thousand words left and then I'm DONE WITH UNI FOREVER punk ), the one thing I will say for an English degree (beyond its obvious usefulness in the real world rolleyes ) is that it does broaden your horizons considerably. I doubt very much whether I'd have ever read a gen-you-wine hardboiled detective novel otherwise. And I'm really enjoying both! There's just so much personality and cynicism and wit oozing out of every throwaway line. Great stuff! I'll have to track down some more stuff by these two gentlemen in the near future. cool

    Also, I realize now just how much a series I was already familiar with - The Dresden Files, which is basically "what if there was a wizard who was also a private detective" - owes to Chandler in particular.
  7. The Maltese Falcon by Hammett is a must.

    Edmund, does your degree qualify for the teacher trainee program (Referendariat) in Germany, should you have any desire to adopt the noble art of education?

    Volker
    "Did you see anything out there?" - "No. Why? What happened?" - "The ship just got herpes."
  8. Captain Future wrote
    The Maltese Falcon by Hammett is a must.

    So I've heard. I'll check it out! I've put the rest of the Philip Marlowe books on my "read sometime in the near-ish future" list as well.

    Captain Future wrote
    Edmund, does your degree qualify for the teacher trainee program (Referendariat) in Germany, should you have any desire to adopt the noble art of education?

    Both my parents are teachers, so the thought that that's where I'll end up has certainly crossed my mind a few times. But no, I don't think my current degree would qualify me. I'm not really sure what I'm going to do next year anyways...
    •  
      CommentAuthorBregje
    • CommentTimeSep 25th 2014 edited
    So. What did I read this year. First of all I suddently felt so fed up with anything related to my job. I just had enough. So I started reading children's books instead. Well, 13+ and 15+.

    Grimpow (Rafael Ábalos) 13+. I read both parts, but they were so different. Part one was more like a 15+ book, while part two was like a 13+ book, much thinner and more simple, very different in writing style too.

    Malfuria trilogy (Christoph Marzi) 13+. Didn't like it much, but I finished all three books.

    Then I read the Taragon trilogy (Eva Raaff) 13+. Loved it!! Dutch and not (yet) translated which is a shame I think. I thought this was really really good.

    Oog van de waarheid
    (Eva Raaff). Nice but not as good as the Taragon books.

    Now I'm reading the Eragon books (Christopher Paolini). Finished Eragon and started Eldest last week.

    So, I'm very much into the fantasy genre. Perhaps something different after Eragon. Oh, I forgot, I also read Erebos (Ursula Poznanski). My daughter read it and said I really needed to read it so I did. While the story is rather one dimensional without any plot twists or something, it was a thrilling and addicting book.
  9. I'm reading a hell of a lot of Stephen King these days. While I hate watching horror films and don't particularly love listening to their scores, I don't mind reading it at all - however, I'll argue hotly with anyone who pigeonholes King as "just" a horror writer. So what I've read is:

    The Gunslinger (Dark Tower I) - hm. I kind of like the empty, desolate feel of it, but it didn't really grab me. A little too artsy and "out there" at times. I've got the other Dark Tower books lined up to read at some point though, and I've heard they're quite different in tone. Maybe I'll appreciate this one more after I've read the rest of the series.

    Bag of Bones - this I really enjoyed. The haunted house stuff is good, of course, but it's the emotional side of the story that really impressed me. I don't think this is a particularly well-known book of his, but I'd definitely recommend it.

    Carrie - a classic and rightfully so.

    It - could probably do with being a few hundred pages shorter (and featuring less awkward underage sex), but the length certainly makes it immersive. And it's genuinely unsettling. They float indeed.

    The Running Man - doesn't pull any punches, a very brutal story. It's interesting to read this post-Hunger Games. The ending, though appropriate, is a little annoyingly abrupt though.

    And now I'm reading Different Seasons, a collection of four novellas, the first of which is (Rita Hayworth and) Shawshank Redemption. Now I won't have an excuse anymore for having not seen the movie. tongue
  10. The Rim Gods from "The John Grimes Saga" - A. Bertram Chandler

    Good old trashy pulp space opera. smile
    "Did you see anything out there?" - "No. Why? What happened?" - "The ship just got herpes."
    •  
      CommentAuthorBregje
    • CommentTimeOct 24th 2014 edited
    Bregje wrote
    Now I'm reading the Eragon books (Christopher Paolini). Finished Eragon and started Eldest last week.

    Prefered Eldest a lot over Eragon! Loved Rorans story very much (I don't think it's a spoiler that Roran gets his own adventure... right?) Now I'm almost halfway Brisingr.

    I'm enjoying these books a lot. I wonder what the fourth part will be like, since it was supposed to be a trilogy.
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeOct 24th 2014
    At the moment I'm reading a book about old tube amplifiers with the idea of making a push-pull class a one.
    Tom
    listen to more classical music!
  11. Simulacron-3 (1964) by Daniel F. Galouye

    The original MATRIX. Galouye was so ahead of his time!

    Volker
    "Did you see anything out there?" - "No. Why? What happened?" - "The ship just got herpes."
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeOct 24th 2014
    Captain Future wrote
    The Rim Gods


    lol


    shame


    :coat: >>>>>>
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
  12. Sorry, but confused

    EDIT: OK, now I consulted an online dictionary. You learn something every day here.
    "Did you see anything out there?" - "No. Why? What happened?" - "The ship just got herpes."
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeOct 24th 2014
  13. I picked up my niece at Cologne airport this morning and took occasion to buy an issue of THE TIMES OF LONDON. I didn't read the TIMES in ages. I have to say I found rather little relevant political, economic of cultural information but a lot of "human interest" stuff. Has this paper ever always been in tabloid format? What British paper do you recommend? I hear some good things about the GUARDIAN.

    Volker
    "Did you see anything out there?" - "No. Why? What happened?" - "The ship just got herpes."