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    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2013 edited
    I've given up reading reviews until after I see the film later today.

    Still, I couldn't resist having a quick peek at Jon's MoS score rating shocked
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2013 edited
    Jon Broxton wrote
    My review of MAN OF STEEL for anyone who is interested:

    http://moviemusicuk.us/2013/06/17/man-o … #more-3505

    Jon


    Steven wrote
    Excellent review, Jon!


    Indeed.
    I especially appreciate Jon's reference to and acknowledgement of Superman's role in (American) popular culture, and how the film's (and the music's!) portrayal seems to break away from that. Agree or disagree, it relegates Supes to "just another" hero with incredible powers who has a hard time "relating".
    Which I think is a step back.
    It ignores Supes' unique nature and simply lumps him in with "the rest" of the Spandex Brigade.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2013 edited
    Well, you can't really have a story about a superhero who follows the "American way" and set it in the present, when the present culture no longer acknowledges or values said "American way" (pretty much the same for truth and justice too)...it would be rather anachronistic don't you think?
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
  1. Another far-too-long review. I just skipped to the "Executive Summary" - Rating: *
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2013 edited
    Scribe wrote
    Well, you can't really have a story about a superhero who follows the "American way" and set it in the present, when the present culture no longer acknowledges or values said "American way" (pretty much the same for truth and justice too)...it would be rather anachronistic don't you think?


    Oh no! In fact MANY a (very good!) story has been written by eminent (comics) writers like Garth Ennis or Alan Moore touching exactly on that kind of dichotomy. That would be an interesting story right there: what does an increasingly cynical and darkened world, where enemies are undefined and hide to blow up your loved ones DO with an Overgrown Boy Scout?)

    But I don't think that was Jon's point: it's not about the "truth, justice and the American way" Superman: it's about Supes' role , his character! Supes has always (even in the grim and gritty eighties) been this beacon of hope.
    That one archetype you could always rely on to do the very best possible (which in itself brought massive conflict in a world that's hardly black and white).
    In the words of DC: Superman doesn't fight evil. He is the very opposite of evil.
    That's what made him unique.

    Now that this "unique selling point" has been taken away, what are we left with?
    Powerful alien in confusion.
    Didn't we just get to see Thor, though?
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2013
    Sadly, you're quite right.
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2013 edited
    Captain Future wrote
    But seriously: What was the earliest thing that brought HZ to your attention? For me it was the main theme from "Rain Man". I catched it somewhere and I would run around humming the tune but noone could help me.


    It was actually the track Burn It All from Backdraft that brought him to my attention.
    It was one of those tracks that at the time was used by EVERY editor of EVERY news/infotainment/documentary program to suggest "tension", so it was heard on on TV ALL the time!

    Then when I got my hands on a highly vaunted demo tape that contained moving 3D scifi images, rendered by a Commodore Amiga*) -a HUGE undertaking in those days! The rendering cost MONTHS- , there too they used that track for a large part of the soundtrack.

    That really triggered me to find THAT piece of music.
    Well., it took another two years before I quite accidentally stumbled on it by getting the soundtrack CD out of the library for no other reason than that it was one of the few I hadn't heard yet. It was a massive "Oh, so THIS is the guy!" lightbulb moment. smile

    *)
    That machine was SO far ahead of it time it wasn't even funny. True multitasking. Dedicated memory access (so you didn't have to "log off", just switch it off!). INSANE video and sound capability.

    I'd bought the tape -had to import it ALL THE WAY from the UK! What an adventure in those days!- for this demo I had read great things about in a nerdy scifi/tech magazine. He did this in 1990!
    Ah. Memories. smile
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorBregt
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2013
    Martijn wrote
    Well., it took another two years before I quite accidentally stumbled on it by getting the soundtrack CD out of the library for no other reason than that it was one of the few I hadn't heard yet. It was a massive "Oh, so THIS is the guy!" lightbulb moment. smile

    cheesy

    That's great when that happens. I often feel smart and retarded at the same time! wink
    Kazoo
    •  
      CommentAuthorJon Broxton
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2013 edited
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    Another far-too-long review. I just skipped to the "Executive Summary" - Rating: *


    It's so heartening to know that the hours and hours I spend researching, listening, writing and proof-reading my reviews so that I am able to present my thoughts about the music we all love in a cogent, honest, and (hopefully) well-written way can simply be boiled down to "tl;dr".

    And people wonder why I want to stop putting star ratings on my reviews.
    •  
      CommentAuthorJon Broxton
    • CommentTimeJun 18th 2013 edited
    Martijn wrote
    I especially appreciate Jon's reference to and acknowledgement of Superman's role in (American) popular culture, and how the film's (and the music's!) portrayal seems to break away from that. Agree or disagree, it relegates Supes to "just another" hero with incredible powers who has a hard time "relating". Which I think is a step back. It ignores Supes' unique nature and simply lumps him in with "the rest" of the Spandex Brigade.


    Thanks, Martijn. That's exactly the point I was making.
  2. Jon Broxton wrote
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    Another far-too-long review. I just skipped to the "Executive Summary" - Rating: *


    It's so heartening to know that the hours and hours I spend researching, listening, writing and proof-reading my reviews so that I am able to present my thoughts about the music we all love in a cogent, honest, and (hopefully) well-written way can simply be boiled down to "tl;dr".

    And people wonder why I want to stop putting star ratings on my reviews.

    Yeah, I couldn't help going slant when I read that comment, Alan...
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 19th 2013 edited
    No offense, but I do find some reviews to be insanely long. (I'm not innocent... I also find some of my rants on my radio show to be obsurdly long when I'm sure all the listener wants to do is hear the music.)

    Again, I'm not saying what they (Jon, James, Christian, etc) are doing is wrong I just don't have the time or the attention span to stare at my monitor for that long reading. But I guess the invention of tablets helps with that and makes reading the internet more like reading a book or magazine instead of staring at your screen.

    What would make those LONG reviews (especally Craig's Golden Age reviews on MMUK, which are friggin' epic) are sound clips or video to accompany the review. I mean, this is the internet, folks. It's a very multi-media friendly playground. Ryan Keaveney used to add sound clips in the body of his reviews, which helped the reader get through some of the rather lengthy write ups and it also helped hammer home some of the points he was making by actually LISTENING to some of the score that was being discussed.

    Making reviews more interactive just might help keep your readership on your page/site a little while longer and make it for a much more engaging experience.

    Anyway, it's just a suggestion.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  3. Edmund Meinerts wrote
    Jon Broxton wrote
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    Another far-too-long review. I just skipped to the "Executive Summary" - Rating: *


    It's so heartening to know that the hours and hours I spend researching, listening, writing and proof-reading my reviews so that I am able to present my thoughts about the music we all love in a cogent, honest, and (hopefully) well-written way can simply be boiled down to "tl;dr".

    And people wonder why I want to stop putting star ratings on my reviews.

    Yeah, I couldn't help going slant when I read that comment, Alan...

    Maybe it's just Man of Steel fatigue or, having read page upon page of comments about the score already, I just didn't want to read any more, I just could not face reading all what had been written.

    Sometimes with writing reviews for movies and scores that are already very well known about, I wonder what the objective of the review in these cases actually is? Jon, I in no way wanted to insult you or your writings. On the contrary, your reviews are always well thought out and well put together. And if I had no idea what this score was about, your review would be an ideal (though still long) analysis of the score from someone whose opinion I respect. And your opinion would be key to giving me an insight to the music and helping me decide whether to purchase or not.

    Maybe having written about music that a lot of the readers of my own blog will never have come across, I am championing the idea of review-writing to try and "sell" a score that I think has merit (or should be avoided) a bit too much.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorRalph Kruhm
    • CommentTimeJun 19th 2013 edited
    Bregt wrote
    That's great when that happens. I often feel smart and retarded at the same time! wink

    That´s what happened with me and Rain Man. I was already a Zimmer fan, years after Backdraft, but somehow never got around to listen to Rain Man. Of course I knew the track from endless uses on TV, so when I finally got to listen to the CD, I was all, "WAIT, WHAT?!? HE(?!?) did that?!?" I felt so stupid.
    • CommentAuthorBasilB
    • CommentTimeJun 19th 2013
    Track list of "The Lone Ranger":
    1. Never Take Off the Mask (1:08)
    2. Absurdity (4:58)
    3. Silver (4:00)
    4. Ride (4:17)
    5. You’ve Looked Better (3:09)
    6. Red’s Theater of the Absurd – Pokey LaFarge and the South City Three (3:02)
    7. The Railroad Waits for No One (3:09)
    8. You’re Just a Man in a Mask (4:14)
    9. For God and for Country (4:53)
    10. Finale (9:51)
    11. Home (6:55)

    Source: www.filmmusicreporter.com

    Not yet sure, if this is the track list for the digital download only and/or for the physical release as well. Wouldn't be too surprised, if the physical product would feature some extra music (aka Silvestris "Avengers").
  4. I have small hopes that it will be good. On one hand Hans seems to have had a lot of fun with it and is excited about it (outside of regular PR), but on the other hand...

    It IS Jerry Bruckheimer...
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
    • CommentAuthorJosh B
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2013
    PawelStroinski wrote
    I have small hopes that it will be good. On one hand Hans seems to have had a lot of fun with it and is excited about it (outside of regular PR), but on the other hand...

    It IS Jerry Bruckheimer...


    You never know. Zimmer could be as inspired by it as he was by At World's End. On the other hand, looking down the Wikipedia list of Bruckheimer films shows one bad score after another...
    • CommentAuthorLars
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2013
    PawelStroinski wrote
    It IS Jerry Bruckheimer...

    bruckheimer is the reason, that i have still hope in hans at least for this movie. and the actionmusic in the available 1 minute clip sounds much better and more orchestral than the actionmusic in Man Of Steel.
  5. PawelStroinski wrote
    It IS Jerry Bruckheimer...

    Which means there's hopes for it to be fun thematic Zimmer, rather than dull droning taking-himself-too-serious Zimmer.
  6. Steven wrote
    Nothing on that list beats Hymn to The Fallen. (Apart from Hymn to The Fallen.)

    Journey to the Line ~ Light.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2013
    Kevin Scarlet wrote
    Steven wrote
    Nothing on that list beats Hymn to The Fallen. (Apart from Hymn to The Fallen.)

    Journey to the Line ~ Light.


    False! Steven is still the winner here!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  7. It's close, I'll concede.

    On a side note, as films, I like The Thin Red Line more than Saving Private Ryan.
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2013
    Kevin Scarlet wrote
    It's close, I'll concede.

    On a side note, as films, I like The Thin Red Line more than Saving Private Ryan.


    Both good films but Ryan touches me more.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2013 edited
    Erik Woods wrote
    Kevin Scarlet wrote
    Steven wrote
    Nothing on that list beats Hymn to The Fallen. (Apart from Hymn to The Fallen.)

    Journey to the Line ~ Light.


    False! Steven is still the winner here!

    -Erik-


    Agree! It's not Journey To The Line "light" by any stretch.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2013
    Kevin Scarlet wrote
    It's close, I'll concede.

    On a side note, as films, I like The Thin Red Line more than Saving Private Ryan.


    I can't stand The Thin Red Line. Saving Private Ryan on the other hand... yeah... I saw it four times in the theatre and have seen it countless times on DVD. Great film.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  8. IDK I thought Red Line was poetry on film (Malick fan here). Private Ryan was good though.
  9. I love The Thin Red Line, film and score.

    As to Saving Private Ryan: I never found a connection to both, film and score. Too cheesy (Kitsch would be the German word). Oh well, maybe I'm a revanchist robot ... No, I just don't like it.

    Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2013
    Both films (and scores ) are absolute masterpieces in their own right, and for their own reasons. On a personal connection, SAVING PRIVATE RYAN is closer to my heart, though. Score-wise, I lean towards THIN RED LINE.
    I am extremely serious.
  10. Haven't seen either film and don't like either score.

    This probably doesn't add much to the discussion.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2013 edited
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    Haven't seen either film and don't like either score.

    This probably doesn't add much to the discussion.


    Really? spin

    There's some great music in TRL by Gabriel Faure and Charles Ives, maybe you'll prefer those pieces? wink
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt