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  1. Guys, what we're not taking into account, the final assignment aside is why Horner wasn't hired back, which I find a far more interesting problem than Hans getting *hired*.

    Personally, I'm considering the fact that Horner might have simply refused to return to this project. As far as I know (I think it was discussed in interviews), he didn't want to do the first one and he agreed only on the strength of his friendship with the director. I don't know where did he admit that, but I remember reading him saying that really he hates superhero movies.

    That and, something crosses my mind, that Horner is refusing doing sequels as much as possible. Though then again, wouldn't he sign up to potential sequels already when he signed the first contract? Though if they wanted him so much (Webb had to beg Horner personally to take it), maybe that was not an option in the first place.
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
  2. And I love how everyone assumes that the score will be shit with nobody (including the hired composer) knowing what it will sound like.
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
  3. Martijn wrote
    I'm more concerned about a rather uniform industry getting an even less diversified look and feel.
    Of course with Hollywood blockbusters a certain degree of bland recognisability is only to be expected (after all, they ALL need to cater to the exact same demographic in the safest and most commercially vianle kind of way).

    On the other hand I can't help but consider Hollywood in the thirties and forties where it was the same handful of people making each and every single aspect of each and every single motion picture work.

    I don't particularly like the direction Zimmer is taking for super heroes, so that's why the fact that he now pretty much hogs the genre annoys me.
    But again: if I should have disliked Alfred Newman in the thirties I would have pretty much had the same issue. smile


    Yeah, RCP is what was the studio system back in the Golden Age. Also, we have to bear in mind, that right now (a main composer with a lot of assistants on his crew being hired by his own company) is the ruling business model in the film music industry, ranging from former RCP composers (Harry Gregson-Williams' Wavecrest) to the likes of Michael Giacchino (Chris Tilton, Chad Seiter and so on).
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
  4. Martijn wrote
    ...

    On the other hand I can't help but consider Hollywood in the thirties and forties where it was the same handful of people making each and every single aspect of each and every single motion picture work.

    ...


    Well, that was the "studio system". Comparisons between how things worked back then and how they work today aren't easily drawn.

    But surely, "Golden Age" composers were more than a handfull: Steiner, Korngold, Kaper, Friedhofer, Hermann, Tiomkin, Young, Newman, Rozsa, Duning, North, Raskin ...

    smile Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJul 19th 2013
    Trust me, it was Newman calling the shots in the thirties and forties. Pretty much single-handedly!
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJul 19th 2013
    Next up: Zimmer composing Star Wars 7 and/or Jurassic Park 4! biggrin
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
  5. PawelStroinski wrote
    ...with nobody (including the hired composer) knowing what it will sound like.


    Oh I think we all have a pretty good idea of what it will sound like wink
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJul 19th 2013
    Scribe wrote
    Next up: Zimmer composing Star Wars 7 and/or Jurassic Park 4! biggrin


    ...and I doubt that would surprise anybody.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
  6. Timmer wrote
    Scribe wrote
    Next up: Zimmer composing Star Wars 7 and/or Jurassic Park 4! biggrin


    ...and I doubt that would surprise anybody.


    That's only if Brian Tyler isn't buisy scoring every single friggin' movie being made. And when they're not busy, Giacchino and Desplat swoop in and take the remainders.
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.
    • CommentAuthorAnthony
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
    Brian Tyler has been getting better and better recently. Give the man more.
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
    James Horner was never going to score Spider-Man 2 - he didn't want to do the first one, only did it as a favour to the director - but I'm astonished that Zimmer is doing it because Marc Webb (the director) has rather strong views about film music and they are not favourable to Hans Zimmer - he must have been hired by someone other than the director.
  7. And maybe that's a good thing. That said, I'm far from excited.
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
  8. Scribe wrote
    Next up: Zimmer composing Star Wars 7 and/or Jurassic Park 4! biggrin

    Bite your tongue.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
    Southall wrote
    he must have been hired by someone other than the director.


    I.e. the producer, I guess.
    The man with the power. slant
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  9. No. I just got it confirmed that it was the director who wanted to work with Hans.
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
    confused dizzy
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
    The power of PR. rolleyes
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
  10. Seemingly, he was pursued on the first movie as well, but didn't want to do it due to Dark Knight duties.
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
    I'd have preferred a swap, Dark Knight would have been better if it had a good score.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    •  
      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
    PawelStroinski wrote
    No. I just got it confirmed that it was the director who wanted to work with Hans.


    That's extraordinary if so. Webb's a real film music fan and I am told that the reason he pursued Horner so vociferously for the first one was because he wanted an old fashioned "good guy / bad guy" score, thematic and orchestral, because he strongly disliked the post-Batman Begins style of comic book movie score and wanted to prove that you could still do it the old way. Remember him tweeting pictures of the conductor's score when he was at the scoring sessions - the intention was to show what properly-composed orchestral music actually looked like. He must have had quite a change in heart!
    •  
      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
    To be uncharacteristically serious, the reason I think Zimmer is ill-suited to this film (and comic book films in general) is that I don't think he has ever shown any particular aptitude for scoring straightforward dramatic narrative films. His best scores have come in the early days on the big action movies where he could afford to be outlandish throughout without the music overpowering the film, and later (a) on more complex films without that straightforward narrative - Thin Red Line obviously, but also things like Black Hawk Down, films where he could take a strong idea and apply it throughout the film - and (b) more lighthearted films, Pirates of the Caribbean and some of the animations and comedies, where again the tendency to start overblown and continue overblown isn't an issue.

    By contrast these comic book films really seem quite simple - a theme for the good guy, a theme for the bad guy, a number of action set pieces, something more tender for the inevitable backstory - that's really all you need, and that's a style of scoring that Zimmer has rarely done, and never done particularly well - he's just not interested in that. The attempt to be modern and hip and fill the score (and film) with moody atmosphere, which seems like a conscious effort to do the very opposite of what logic would dictate is the right way of scoring it, just doesn't work. Well, I don't think it does anyway.
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
    IMO, he scored At World's End as a "straightforward dramatic narrative", far more so than the film actually warranted, so I think your point is going over my head. I would love to hear something like what he did for At World's End applied to the Spider-man universe.

    And if Webb wanted Horner for a classic "good guy / bad guy" score, I don't think that worked out very well, because those type of scores generally require some type of recognizable bad guy motif, and I cannot for the life of me remember any bad guy music from that score, just various enjoyable renditions of the main theme interspersed with way too much mickey mousing.
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
    •  
      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
    Scribe wrote
    IMO, he scored At World's End as a "straightforward dramatic narrative", far more so than the film actually warranted, so I think your point is going over my head.


    But that's a lighthearted film. Dramatic subtlety not required. So he can do it.
    •  
      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
    I thought it was trying to be a ridiculously serious film.
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
    Scribe wrote
    I thought it was trying to be a ridiculously serious film.


    Hear bloody hear!
    For all the over-the-top set pieces, the tone, quite unfittingly, was far less fun than the previous installments.
    Terrible film. Very enjoyable score.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  11. Southall wrote
    To be uncharacteristically serious, the reason I think Zimmer is ill-suited to this film (and comic book films in general) is that I don't think he has ever shown any particular aptitude for scoring straightforward dramatic narrative films. His best scores have come in the early days on the big action movies where he could afford to be outlandish throughout without the music overpowering the film, and later (a) on more complex films without that straightforward narrative - Thin Red Line obviously, but also things like Black Hawk Down, films where he could take a strong idea and apply it throughout the film - and (b) more lighthearted films, Pirates of the Caribbean and some of the animations and comedies, where again the tendency to start overblown and continue overblown isn't an issue.

    By contrast these comic book films really seem quite simple - a theme for the good guy, a theme for the bad guy, a number of action set pieces, something more tender for the inevitable backstory - that's really all you need, and that's a style of scoring that Zimmer has rarely done, and never done particularly well - he's just not interested in that. The attempt to be modern and hip and fill the score (and film) with moody atmosphere, which seems like a conscious effort to do the very opposite of what logic would dictate is the right way of scoring it, just doesn't work. Well, I don't think it does anyway.


    Hmm, what about his smaller-scale works like House of the Spirits, Spanglish, As Good As It Gets and Frost/Nixon?
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
    Timmer wrote
    I'd have preferred a swap, Dark Knight would have been better if it had a good score.


    It did have a good score. An excellent score actually!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJul 20th 2013
    "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it" wink
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  12. It's official. angry angry angry

    My interest in this film has completely evaporated.
  13. I think this response in the FSM thread on Spider-Man & Zimmer, by MattyO, is a good way of suming things up:

    I don't have much to add, but the sad part about this for me is feeling my heart sink when I saw the thread title. This bothered me in a couple of ways. Around the time of At World's End I was gobsmacked with Zimmer's music, exploring his back catalogue and gearing up in excitement with every new film he scored. And it's not that I've disliked the work he's done recently (I unshamedly enjoy Man of Steel and Lone Ranger). I think I'm just over saturated with Zimmer. Over saturated with the PR blitz that goes along with each of his "big" scores, over saturated with the ghost writer questions each of his score raises, over saturated with the general atmosphere that surrounds each of his soundtrack releases. I guess I'm just starting to tire of the whole Hans Zimmer enterprise of film scoring. Others have said there's so many talented composers out there hungry to sink their teeth into the superhero genre, yet the Zimmer machine continues to chug trough the industry. I'm more upset because I really enjoyed Horner's first score and as someone who has only been aware of Horner for a few short years, it distresses me to see his output diminish year by year.
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.