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  1. I thought it looked like every single one of the 14,826 other post-Blade Runner Asian-influenced cyberpunk neo-noir cities of the future, but OK.
  2. Anyone been watching the German language Netflix show, DARK?

    I've just finished watching season 1 and really enjoyed it. Jumping between several periods in time, this time-travelling sombre drama certainly draws in the viewer after a slow start. I must admit that I haven't followed all the tortuous plot threads and all the characters between the times but it's easy to watch it again to try and shed a bit of light onto the bits I struggled with originally!

    I think that I enjoyed this more than I did STRANGER THINGS, and I look forward to a second season.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2018
    Yup, loved DARK. I don't really see much of the STRANGER THINGS connection that people keep mentioning, to be honest. Time travel and a little bit of 80s nostalgia aren't enough for that, plus the show has a whole other atmosphere, vibe and conceptualization. This was far more complex and gritty.
    I am extremely serious.
  3. Edmund Meinerts wrote
    I thought it looked like every single one of the 14,826 other post-Blade Runner Asian-influenced cyberpunk neo-noir cities of the future, but OK.


    It did. It was done well enough anyway. Regarding that casting controversy plus the marketing disaster I hope they learn their lessons concerning that AKIRA live action remake that apparently still has not been layed ad acta.
    Maybe the lesson to be learned here is to abandon AKIRA for good. Dystrophy anime scifi is too much of a niche market.
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
  4. Thor wrote
    Yup, loved DARK. I don't really see much of the STRANGER THINGS connection that people keep mentioning, to be honest. Time travel and a little bit of 80s nostalgia aren't enough for that, plus the show has a whole other atmosphere, vibe and conceptualization. This was far more complex and gritty.

    There are one or two similar aspects as you mention, but it's a completely different beast. I see a few people complaining that the 'pay off' at the end wasn't really worth the journey but I liked the journey a lot and didn't mind that a lot of what went on wasn't resolved by the end. Looking forward to season 2 - I just hope that they can keep up the levels.

    I loved the feel of Ben Frost's score in the show.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJan 5th 2018
    Yeah, the Frost score had a bit of a Max Richter vibe, I thought.
    I am extremely serious.
  5. Ghost in the Shell (1995)

    This has been a while. I wasn't quite aware just how much they hat altered the original story for the 2017 live action update. Whereas the original (1987) manga story, that translated directly into the anime film was indebted to Gibson's Neuromancer the recent version felt more like a rip-off of Blade Runner.

    Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
  6. Passengers

    I'm so pissed with critics right now. I swear this will be the last movie I'll miss in theatres because of bad reviews. While I see some of the critic's points, it's nowhere near as bad as they made it out to be. I understand the story is problematic, but I think it's been handled a lot better than I did expect after all the SJWs smashing it to pieces. I think all characters' actions are completely in line with what would happen, and only the fact that the drama is getting resolved a bit faster by a catalyst plot development is what transforms this thing into an entertaining popcorn drama instead of an oscar-worthy thing. All actors involved are great, with Jen Lawrence especially giving a f*cking great performance. The effects are amazing, the Avalon's design is flawless and pretty spectacular. I want a 3-foot-model of this thing so badly. The action is minimal but entertaining. The score enhances it properly, with a soundscape completely in line with what came before, both space movie and Newman-wise (yes, I'm looking at you, Wall-E).

    I watched it with the whole family, and we all enjoyed it massively, everyone headdesking we didn't see it on the biggest screen available when we could have.
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJan 6th 2018
    Indeed so. Same feelings from me.
  7. I took some issue with the ethics involved with a central element of the plot but apart from that I too found this an interesting and entertaining film. The actors are great, the visuals are stunning and Newman's score I like a lot.

    Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
    •  
      CommentAuthorAidabaida
    • CommentTimeJan 6th 2018
    The Untouchables

    I'd heard how good this movie is... and, well, yeah, it's really good.
    Bach's music is heartless and robotic.
  8. Ghost in the Shell (live action)

    Avoiding the mistake I made with Passengers, I already watched this one in theatre (alone). Yesterday was the family's BluRay watch. They did enjoy it, as I did, again. We all agree that the movie feels more like a standard SciFi crime movie in its first half, but it really picks up heart and speed around the middle section and is a lot more fun to watch in its second half.

    Personally, I'm fascinated by the way Scarlett moves completely different than she does as Black Widow, and how she portraits the awakening of her soul over the course of the movie. She acts so cold and soulless during the first half, and it's both truly amazing and heart-breaking to watch her when the realization kicks in about what happened to her, and adrenalizing to see her fighting to get her life back, adjusting the acting into so much more. Absolutely brilliant. Ignoring the ethnical criticism that (again) droned out any real chance for the movie to succeed with the masses, she was a f'cking amazing choice to play the character. I'm not saying someone else couldn't have done it, just that she does her job very well. She's not to blame for anything.

    Visually, the movie is stunning to watch. It truly aimed for remarkable views, and succeeded in presenting a more realistic version of the future look of cities than Blade Runner 2049 does (though BR succeeds spectacularly in showing a more artistically satisfying look).

    The music is perfectly fine without setting any high notes. It doesn't distract from the movie and succeeds in creating the monotone mood we're used to get in cyberpunk settings.
  9. I enjoyed Passengers, but I do think the fact that Jennifer Lawrence forgives Chris Pratt (sorry, can't be bothered to look up their character names) faaaaaaaar too quickly for what is essentially an unforgivable act casts a bit of a sour note over the entire film. I can understand that being impossible to get past for some people. But otherwise yes, I found it an engaging and beautiful movie that was far better than the reviews made it out to be.
  10. I don't think it's too fast. [spoiler]They show a lengthy montage of her being extremely pissed, angry, and hurt, which seems to last much longer (I think) than the time they spend as a couple. They even avoid possible shit like him saving her when she's close to drowning (which would have been a typical first step to lead out of the crisis). It also helps that, basically, she knows and understands why he did it. It doesn't make it more acceptable, but at least he also does a lot of things right to make up for it afterwards, like, trying to apologize, trying to give her the space she needs, and so on. I mean, he really tries. Doesn't change the fact, and she leaves him hanging, rightfully, but she notices his effort. And when ... Fishburne... tells her about the drowning man and all, he basically adds to that. Throw in a live-threatening crisis where they both, as a team, save over 5000 people, with him immediately willing to sacrifice himself for that and all and giving her the (questionable) satisfaction that her life now indeed does count for something, I think it's okay to accept all that, not least because, in the end, it's one thing to be eternally pissed and hurt about someone, but in that crisis, letting him die and all the shock... no, I think, we're in the green. I can accept this.

    The problem is that we live in a climate of society where forgiveness is not exactly on the board anymore, people divorce over how they want their morning toast, and everyone is annoyed and feels shocked by everything. I'm not saying it should be easier to forgive things like that, and there are (of course!) lots of unforgivable acts out there. But this is not a truly unforgivable act, in my view, because it has a completely understandable human motivation causing it. It's certainly so far beyond our understanding... that's what good SciFi does, it threatens our world view with a problem that makes you think, "is that acceptable or not". In the end she doesn't even say that she does forgive him. But she has accepted why he did it, accepts the situation as it is, and decides to go with her positive feelings instead of the negative. It is kind of refreshing to see a movie go against that direction we've been taking as a society. It's certainly a risky comment, and obviously, they lost for taking that risk. But I appreciate it.
    [/spoiler]
  11. I was hoping to catch THE ORVILLE on Fox from the start but didn't notice that it had already started until Episode 4. I'd heard much about it, much of it very positive. But I was unimpressed by the bit I caught. A second-rate attempt at a STAR TREK/scifi parody that was done much better in GALAXY QUEST. And that goes for what music I heard: an anonymous title theme and lazy lifts (or should that be 'homage') from Jerry Goldsmith STAR TREK. I didn't find any of the show dramatic or funny.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
  12. Some great thoughts, Ralph. I agree, the fact that the film gets you thinking to such a degree about these issues means it has already succeeded as sci-fi. My memory is of feeling like it skipped too quickly to the romance (it didn't ignore the issue entirely, sure, but it didn't feel like that issue was what it was most interested in grappling with even though it's such an intriguing one). But I only saw the film the one time, so perhaps it's due a second shake.
  13. I think the movie is one long montage of montages, by which it went through all the steps necessary at each of the dilemmas.
    [spoiler]Pratt realising his problem, trying to accept it, some time going through with it, then failing.
    Lawrence taking the same steps, just more quickly, and not failing cause she has Pratt available to help her through it.
    Then the romance with all the steps.
    Then the realisation, anger, hate, up to her brutal attack in his bedroom (that was phenomenal!!!)
    Then a kind of acceptance of the situation, then - the crisis. More acceptance, based on the talks with Fishburne.
    End of crisis. Realization. The End.
    [/spoiler]
    I think the movie runs quickly through several dramas after another, all of which could have made a complete movie in itself. Personally, I'm thankful it got made the way it did.
  14. Hacksaw Ridge

    Wow, I loved this movie. Love it so much that it can hold it's place alongside Saving Private Ryan (though that one had an even better dramatic angle and story). The two part story, the build up and then the unbelievable second part hold well together. But it's of course the second part that made my jaw drop for almost the entire time. The battle scenes are ferocious and made them look equally brutal as actually amazing. This is a movie that needs the blood and guts to elevate the horror of battle, and Gibson of course is a master at displaying this. The unbelievable tale (if even half of it is true) is nothing short of astounding and I'm glad the person Doss got the recognition for it in the time, and now again.

    Truly amazing film.

    9 out of 10
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
    •  
      CommentAuthorAidabaida
    • CommentTime3 days ago
    Thomas Glorieux wrote
    Hacksaw Ridge

    Wow, I loved this movie. Love it so much that it can hold it's place alongside Saving Private Ryan (though that had one had an even better dramatic angle and story). The two part story, the build up and then the unbelievable second part hold well together. But it's of course the second part that made my jaw drop for almost the entire time. The battle scenes are ferocious and made them look equally brutal as actually amazing. This is a movie that needs the blood and guts to elevate the horror of battle, and Gibson of course is a master at displaying this. The unbelievable tale (if even half of it is true) is nothing short of astounding and I'm glad the person Doss got the recognition for it in the time, and now again.

    Truly amazing film.

    9 out of 10


    Thanks for the recommendation! I haven't seen this one yet.
    Bach's music is heartless and robotic.
    •  
      CommentAuthorLSH
    • CommentTime3 days ago edited
    I felt it was little 'on the nose'. The first half feels like a Hallmark TV movie and the battle scenes almost slip into Tropic Thunder territory.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTime3 days ago
    Great movie! Gibson contextualizes violence by exaggerating it, and putting it in relieff.
    I am extremely serious.
  15. I wanted to watch a new TV series to keep me from getting bored and thinking too much about life.

    I was in a Mike Post mood, so started from the bottom of his resume to see if there was anything worth watching.


    First I tried the TV movie that acted as a pilot for a series that did get picked up but was short lived, called "The Rousters".

    Not necessarily bad, but about ten minutes in I chucked it.



    Then I tried a two-season lived series called "Booker".
    Described on IMDb as:
    Dennis Booker, an ex-cop, is hired by the US office of a large Japanese company to investigate some suspect insurance claims. He is very anti-authority, resents being told what to do, and seems to spend most of his time investigating cases related to his family, friends and colleagues rather than his employers.


    Okay, so that should be worth it. I thought.

    I struggled to stay with the pilot. Dumped the series in the middle of episode two.

    Also, that's not the musical side of Mike Post I want to hear.



    Then I finally went to "Wiseguy", a series that lasted four seasons. The Post scoring is low-key and nothing really ever stands out. It sounds more like Walter Murphy's work on the final season of "Hunter". Also, I heard what was clearly some uncredited additional music by Ron Jones (he worked on some Post-scored series doing that).

    A wise move. A good series. A serialized series back when a number of TV shows were trying to do self-contained episodes. Only nine episodes into the first season, they had already managed to realistically tied things up; so mid season the wiseguy is going on to another assignment. Pretty swift.
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.