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      CommentAuthorLSH
    • CommentTimeJul 21st 2019
    LSH wrote
    THE LION KING dir. John Favreau

    Just came out of a screening and I’m utterly overwhelmed by how mixed my feelings are.

    I’ll come back and edit this post when I’ve collected my thoughts. But overall, this is an upsettingly mixed bag.


    Quite simply... I was so utterly engrossed with how spectacular it looked. However, as most have said so far, there’s a strange coldness around the animals. I suppose it’s difficult to animate emotion into creatures that are so ridiculously photorealistic without making it weird. They went about as far as they could, I expect. I will admit, though, all the moments without talking, it was beautiful to look at. I even enjoyed the songs; the original was the first film I ever saw in a cinema so I did get a little bit emotional in parts (the first three minutes had me bawling my eyes out).

    Overall, despite being a technical marvel, I fear this isn’t the best vehicle for an actual narrative. Particularly one in which the characters sing. Favreau’s The Jungle Book definitely works better... perhaps because there is a single real human character that everything is centred around?
  1. Southall wrote
    The Meg

    I don't know why I watched this. I wish I hadn't.


    It was ridiculous. I wouldn't watch it again, but I might not consider watching once a waste of time. Maybe.

    LSH wrote
    THE LION KING dir. John Favreau

    Just came out of a screening and I’m utterly overwhelmed by how mixed my feelings are.

    I’ll come back and edit this post when I’ve collected my thoughts. But overall, this is an upsettingly mixed bag.


    I'm hesitant to see this one. The original is my favorite Disney animation, so I can't imagine it will hold up for me. I haven't really liked any of these remakes, so that's another strike against it. I'm sure I'll see it when it's out of the theaters, but I'm not holding my breath.

    Steven wrote
    Stranger Things 3

    Beautifully shot, fantastic CGI (the best I've ever seen in a TV show), wonderfully creepy monster designs.... but thematically disjointed. And basically the same schtick again: Monster terrorises town, kids inexplicably figure everything out, fight monster, Millie Bobbie Whatever yet again proves she's one of the most overrated child actors, send monster back to upside down world, cliffhanger for a set up for the exact same formula in season 4.

    It goes from heady sci-fi/horror to a farce a little too abrubtly at times. And the whole 80s nostalgia, for me, is the least interesting part of the show. Every time it's shoe-horned in it takes me out of the story. The whole Russian-Terminator guy was a reference too far. We get it, he's the terminator. Winona Ryder continues to be one-note perpetually-flustered mum. And that cringe Neverending Story song scene gave me grey hairs... but of course everyone on social media loves it.

    I think I hate everything.


    The show is getting pretty samey, but I enjoyed season 3. For the most part I enjoy the 80s stuff, but the whole conversation about New Coke was really weird - like super obvious product placement for a product that no longer exists. The Neverending Story scene was awful. I actually thought this season featured Millie Bobbie Brown's best acting, but some margin.

    FalkirkBairn wrote
    The ending was almost as drawn out as Return of the King.


    Yes. Yes it was. They basically made us watch the ending twice.
  2. I saw SHAZAM! over the weekend. The DCEU films have been pretty terrible for me. WONDER WOMAN was okay. I think SHAZAM is my favorite of theirs so far. There are some serious tonal inconsistencies, but for the most part I thought it was really fun. And Wallfisch's score worked really well.
  3. I was pleasantly surprised how fun and refreshing Shazam! was. Not an amazing film but a nice antidote to the doom and gloom and overbearing spectacle of previous DCEU entries.

    LSH, this isn't necessarily aimed at you specifically, but everyone keeps saying how amazing the new Lion King looks...and, from the trailers (have no intention of encouraging all of Disney's worst habits by giving them my ticket money on these remakes), I don't see it? I mean yeah, technically the CGI of the animals is great and the fur is super detailed and whatnot, but everything is kinda just...brown. The original 1994 Lion King is gorgeous and colorful, this just looks like a nature documentary except the animals are fake (and even then, the African savannah doesn't look this drab and joyless in most documentaries I've seen).
    • CommentAuthorJules
    • CommentTimeJul 26th 2019
    Edmund Meinerts wrote
    I was pleasantly surprised how fun and refreshing Shazam! was. Not an amazing film but a nice antidote to the doom and gloom and overbearing spectacle of previous DCEU entries.

    LSH, this isn't necessarily aimed at you specifically, but everyone keeps saying how amazing the new Lion King looks...and, from the trailers (have no intention of encouraging all of Disney's worst habits by giving them my ticket money on these remakes), I don't see it? I mean yeah, technically the CGI of the animals is great and the fur is super detailed and whatnot, but everything is kinda just...brown. The original 1994 Lion King is gorgeous and colorful, this just looks like a nature documentary except the animals are fake (and even then, the African savannah doesn't look this drab and joyless in most documentaries I've seen).


    Personally thought it was really bad. Takes all the fun and creativity out of the original, save for maybe the new Timon and Pumbaa. A glorified tech demo
  4. I saw Danny Boyle's Yesterday this week and thought it was wonderfully original and refreshingly heartwarming. And Kate McKinnon was absolutely hilarious in it.
  5. As Thomas requested, I have now seen The Goonies (1985).

    The Famous Five meet the Olsen Gang. smile It works. Spielberg and Donner give a big nod to childhood fantasies. Grusin's score works great in context. Fine family entertainment.

    Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
  6. Captain Future wrote
    As Thomas requested, I have now seen The Goonies (1985).

    The Famous Five meet the Olsen Gang. smile It works. Spielberg and Donner give a big nod to childhood fantasies. Grusin's score works great in context. Fine family entertainment.

    Volker


    Excellent, as it's a film from my childhood, I never get tired seeing such enthusiasm on screen. That with that typical 80's vibe makes it one of my all time favorites beer
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
  7. RW: The Night Manager

    Fantastic mini-series based on a John Le Carré spy thriller about a night manager working in an Egyptian hotel who gets sucked into the world of arms dealers and political intrigue.

    The night manager is played by Tom Hiddleston. If he's never going to be James Bond, this is the closest he will ever get to playing him. The arms dealer is played by Hugh Laurie, who manages to be his most diabolical self. Those two are simply brilliant in the way they play off each other. Now add a very pregnant Olivia Coleman to the mix as a British ex-spy who fights international arms deals business now, as well as several perfectly cast Bond girls (including Elizabeth Debicki who gives a mesmerizing performance as Laurie's girlfriend), a gripping, Emmy-winning score by Victor Reyes that cannot deny its roots either, and you get a six-hour thriller well worth your time.

    It's a lot more talking and less action than Bond, though. No car, boat, or skiing chases, but the settings are all there. The series does a lot of global hopping and always looks spectacular. If you're fine with simply watching brilliant actors doing what they do best for six hours while you quietly bite away your fingernails, this is for you.

    Trailer: youtu.be/g-ZcaKdvML8
    Score Sample: youtu.be/JwTFs7Tue10

    We've watched it on Amazon Prime. You may have to look elsewhere for it depending on where you live.
  8. Alita Battle Angel

    I'm not too familiar with the manga genre. Still, the science fiction fan will find many familiar ideas here. (Ghost in the Shell, Rollerball ... Alan Parsons spin ). It's a well paced, entertaining story. Alita's development is a little rushed, but no big matter. I liked the cast. Holkenborg's music was fine in context. I'll revisit that score.
    This is one of those films, that are basically animated films. Living actors almost feel a little displaced here.

    Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeAug 31st 2019
    It's my second favourite film of the year so far.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeSep 1st 2019
    The Dark Crystal

    Since everyone is exploding with pleasure at the new tv series I thought I’d better give the film a watch. All I can say is I hope the tv series is nothing like it.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeSep 1st 2019 edited
    Couldn't disagree more. I saw the film for the first time a couple of days ago, and was totally blown away by it. Instant top mark! Ridiculous that I didn't see this as a kid. Thankfully, the show is very much the same, although more up-tempo in its editing, camera movements and landscapes.
    I am extremely serious.
  9. I plan to watch the original movie again before watching the series. I remember seeing the original movie on the big screen when it was shown at the start of the first SONCINEMAD film music festival where Trevor Jones had a concert of his music, including a suite from THE DARK CRYSTAL.

    It was good to see it on the big screen.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeSep 1st 2019 edited
    I'm envious of that, Alan. It's a film that's really supposed to be watched on the big screen. Like AVATAR, its world and engrossing feel are supposed to wash over you, and although you can get a glimpse of that on the telly, I'm guessing it has far more impact in a darkened theatre.
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeSep 1st 2019
    Just not my genre, I think. I'm pretty sure I did watch it as a kid, but I didn't remember it at all.
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeSep 2nd 2019
    It's dependent on whether you like serious films about puppets and fantasy. I like 1/3 of these things, so I've never really warmed to Dark Crystal.

    But the wonderfully creepy skeksis were formative in my childhood and probably why I find birds a little freakish.
  10. I watched The Dark Crystal yesterday and was surprised how little of a story there actually was. It seems too scary to be a kids movie but the story is too slim for it to work completely as a film for adults.

    But, the whole look and feel of the world within the movie is good and I did find myself drawn into the various races - though the gelflings are a bit lifeless in their expressions (though I imagine the skeksis and urRu (mystics) are just as inanimate with their facial expressions but it doesn't feel that way).

    Now that I have had my refresher I do plan to delve into the Netflix series.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
  11. I recently got really interested in the history of film and fell all the way down that rabbit hole. After a bunch of research I now have a list of 1000+ films I want to see. I'm starting way back at the beginning, watching some of Edison's company's films and the Lumiere brothers. I then watched a bunch of Georges Melies's films. I moved one to some of Porter's and Griffith's and a few others.

    It's just been fascinating to watch these and think that I'm seeing people on film that were born in the middle of the 19th century. It's also super fascinating for me to watch things and think, "that's probably the first time anyone ever did that in a film."
  12. Griffith:
    Some weeks ago I bought "Birth of a Nation" on BluRay through a third party seller on amazon UK. The film is somewhat hard to come by in Germany for obvious reasons. I haven't seen it yet, but I read the documentation, which is really good. No beating around the bush concerning the obvious racism, the glorification of the clan. They also give good reasons why to release such a film anyway. You have to weigh the ground breaking aesthetics against the political views they support.
    A comparable case is another film that I have on DVD: "Olympia" by Leni Riefenstahl (1938), depicting the Nazi propaganda Olympics in Berlin. Sergei Eisenstein would probably be another director to be named in this context.

    Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeSep 7th 2019
    christopher wrote
    I recently got really interested in the history of film and fell all the way down that rabbit hole. After a bunch of research I now have a list of 1000+ films I want to see. I'm starting way back at the beginning, watching some of Edison's company's films and the Lumiere brothers. I then watched a bunch of Georges Melies's films. I moved one to some of Porter's and Griffith's and a few others.

    It's just been fascinating to watch these and think that I'm seeing people on film that were born in the middle of the 19th century. It's also super fascinating for me to watch things and think, "that's probably the first time anyone ever did that in a film."


    That's a commendable project. I remember I did the same way back when I studied film at the university. Watching films is a much better 'education' than reading about them (although the latter is great for context).

    I recommend Cannes boss Thierry Fremaux's film "Lumière ! l'aventure commence" from a couple of years ago, if you haven't already seen it. Combines a lot of the Lumiere brothers' early films, and they get a kind of new life when juxtaposed this way.
    I am extremely serious.