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  1. Demetris wrote
    Erik Woods wrote
    NP: Fury - Steven Price

    I know that there is no RIGHT way to score to a film and this could just be me but hearing a modern score of this sort in a film set in 1945 seems... well, THIS!

    suicide

    -Erik-


    It's a world war 2 film ffs. I am sure that when i watch the film, the score will be even more unfitting than what i imagine it to be on disc. Same as the flawed Gone Girl last night (referring to the awful score).


    Here's something to not enjoy (well, maybe Thor will):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJ9AEVjQGek
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2014
    ^ That's terrible. Unlike Carl Davis who wrote a brilliant score for that film.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2014
    Who the feck is BHN Wager?
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2014
    ^ He sucks! That's all we need to know.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2014
    Yeah. I think we'll leave it at that Erik.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
  2. Timmer wrote
    Captain Future wrote

    PS: Oh, and D, you HAVE to watch 2010! Just saw it on BR and it is so stunning. The design of the Russian ship, the design of DISCOVERY, the design of everything! That compelling story! That cast! The practical effect shots are crisp as fried chicken skin! Never saw anything remotely as convincing in CGI (I guess). GO SEE THAT MOVIE!


    How oddly in-synch we are. I just watched this again the other night after our conversations about it recently ( not on BR unfortunately ), I agree with the Captain. The film stands up brilliantly and I fell in love with it all over again. I still wish the score was purely orchestral and I believe D will have issues with it ( we'll see? ) but I like it a lot more now than I did then.


    I bought the BluRay some time ago without then having a BR player. dizzy When I now bought a new 32'' TV set for my parent's place I got a cheap BR player along with it. On this small a screen it does not make much of a difference compared to the remastered DVD that I also own. Since I am no fan of big TV sets this convinced me to keep my DVDs and not replace them with BRs.
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
  3. justin boggan wrote
    Demetris wrote
    Erik Woods wrote
    NP: Fury - Steven Price

    I know that there is no RIGHT way to score to a film and this could just be me but hearing a modern score of this sort in a film set in 1945 seems... well, THIS!

    suicide

    -Erik-


    It's a world war 2 film ffs. I am sure that when i watch the film, the score will be even more unfitting than what i imagine it to be on disc. Same as the flawed Gone Girl last night (referring to the awful score).


    Here's something to not enjoy (well, maybe Thor will):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJ9AEVjQGek

    That's hilarious! biggrin
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2014
    Thor would even enjoy that scene with 80's pop synths on it wink
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2014
    justin boggan wrote

    Here's something to not enjoy (well, maybe Thor will):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJ9AEVjQGek


    I... er... what.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2014
    Demetris wrote
    Thor would even enjoy that scene with 80's pop synths on it wink


    I would definitely prefer 80s pop synths (a la Moroder's METROPOLIS) than what I saw in that BEN HUR clip above. Not good. Always skeptical of drum kits and orchestra this way, unless it's done in a rhytmically satisfying and appropriate way for the drama.
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2014
    El Cid - Miklos Rozsa

    When I'm abducted by aliens and they demand to know how half a century of progress and evolution has led from this to Ramin Djawadi and Henry Jackman I think I'm going to have a hard time explaining.
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2014 edited
    Southall wrote
    El Cid - Miklos Rozsa

    When I'm abducted by aliens and they demand to know how half a century of progress and evolution has led from this to Ramin Djawadi and Henry Jackman I think I'm going to have a hard time explaining.


    applause <-sober expression not smiley
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2014
    Southall wrote
    El Cid - Miklos Rozsa

    When I'm abducted by aliens and they demand to know how half a century of progress and evolution has led from this to Ramin Djawadi and Henry Jackman I think I'm going to have a hard time explaining.


    Say hello from me. Thanks.
  4. Southall wrote
    El Cid - Miklos Rozsa

    When I'm abducted by aliens and they demand to know how half a century of progress and evolution has led from this to Ramin Djawadi and Henry Jackman I think I'm going to have a hard time explaining.


    I want to watch that show.

    NP: Automata (Riva)

    Hmmm... nah. Nothing we haven't heard in bits and pieces in other places. Oooh, nice cello, sweet piano, how lovely . Yawn.
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
  5. NP: Fury (Price)

    It is funny to hear the 'hun' associated with such dire chanting over the asteroid ostinati of GRAVITY.

    As to whether the music is appropriate for WW2 or not, I look at the history of music in WW2 movies, and I have no idea what it's meant to sound like. Could it be holy americana chorus and Coplandia of Saving Private Ryan? The New Age + Wagner + Polynesian hymns + Arvo Part of The Thin Red Line? A fusion of spaghetti western Morricone and David Bowie, perhaps (Inglorious Basterds)? The obsessively-repeated sad jazz piano of Flags of Our Fathers? Prokofiev-walks-the-earth-again of Enemy at the Gates?

    Could it be WW2 is what an artist makes of it?
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2014
    franz_conrad wrote
    Could it be WW2 is what an artist makes of it?


    If your name is Dmitri Shostakovitch? Yes! wink
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2014 edited
    franz_conrad

    As to whether the music is appropriate for WW2 or not, I look at the history of music in WW2 movies, and I have no idea what it's meant to sound like.


    Ideally like Malcolm Arnold, Dmitri Tiomkin, Jerry Goldsmith, Elmer Bernstein and Ron Goodwin. FACT! biggrin
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
  6. Yeah, you say that, but...

    Elmer Bernstein -- on the jingoistic side, the most jazzy in its chords, more likely to be playful (going on GREAT ESCAPE)
    Jerry Goldsmith -- a bit more modernist, meter-driven, Bartok, experimental in effects (PATTON, TORA TORA)
    Ron Goodwin -- of all the sounds, probably the one most skewed towards brass-led heroics (Wagner's Siegfried) (BATTLE OF BRITAIN), but then you have something much darker like the prominent snare drum fugue of WHERE EAGLES DARE

    Seriously, WWII's sound changes with the times, and skews to whatever the filmmakers want to highlight in it.
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2014
    franz_conrad wrote
    Yeah, you say that, but...


    ...you take me seriously? wink
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
  7. It was that biggrin emoticon that did it for me. I know feigned sarcasm when I see it. wink
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
  8. Timmer wrote
    franz_conrad

    As to whether the music is appropriate for WW2 or not, I look at the history of music in WW2 movies, and I have no idea what it's meant to sound like.


    Ideally like Malcolm Arnold, Dmitri Tiomkin, Jerry Goldsmith, Elmer Bernstein and Ron Goodwin. FACT! biggrin


    Vangelis' 80s synths were as appropriate for the future of BLADE RUNNER as they were for depicting the Paris Olympics of 1924. I can't quite follow this whole discussion.

    Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2014
    Captain Future wrote
    Timmer wrote
    franz_conrad

    As to whether the music is appropriate for WW2 or not, I look at the history of music in WW2 movies, and I have no idea what it's meant to sound like.


    Ideally like Malcolm Arnold, Dmitri Tiomkin, Jerry Goldsmith, Elmer Bernstein and Ron Goodwin. FACT! biggrin


    Vangelis' 80s synths were as appropriate for the future of BLADE RUNNER as they were for depicting the Paris Olympics of 1924. I can't quite follow this whole discussion.

    Volker


    I think it stems from what I perceive as a rather reactionary attitude wherein only one particular mode of music is deemed appropriate for a given period -- most likely a preference for conventions. I think that's rather limiting, to be honest. Anything goes -- as franz points out above -- as long as the music answers to whatever 'project' or style the filmmaker goes for.

    For some reason, there are those who think an orchestral, traditional, neo-romantic sound is all one ever needs. Even if that is also an anachronism in many cases.
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2014
    I do think "anachronism" is a very odd concept when it comes to film music (though no doubt I have used the term myself over the years). You're putting music over something where music doesn't naturally belong, then it's about feeling and colour and drama and whatever technique achieves the feeling, colour and drama you're looking for is obviously the right one. I suppose it's more about conventions, which were generally defined by film composers of the past. People think historical epics should sound like Ben-Hur because that's what Miklos Rozsa established, space movies should sound like Star Wars, etc.

    I think most of us realise there's more than one way of skinning a cat, despite the comments in this thread that prompted this discussion (I don't suppose that in his heart of hearts Demetris really thinks The Fury should have been scored like 633 Squadron, he's just throwing ammunition at a score he doesn't like). Sometimes composers try something different and it doesn't come off - I don't think it's really anything to do with anachronism. There's something quite quaint about scoring some of the most horrific events in recent human history with those toe-tapping fully orchestral marches - of course, that style reflects the way the stories were told within their films, but still, it's a bit galling to be told that that style is somehow appropriate for World War 2 (in which sixty million people lost their lives) but music conveying terror, chaos, confusion etc isn't.
  9. Well said.
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
  10. franz_conrad wrote
    NP: Fury (Price)

    It is funny to hear the 'hun' associated with such dire chanting over the asteroid ostinati of GRAVITY.

    As to whether the music is appropriate for WW2 or not, I look at the history of music in WW2 movies, and I have no idea what it's meant to sound like. Could it be holy americana chorus and Coplandia of Saving Private Ryan? The New Age + Wagner + Polynesian hymns + Arvo Part of The Thin Red Line? A fusion of spaghetti western Morricone and David Bowie, perhaps (Inglorious Basterds)? The obsessively-repeated sad jazz piano of Flags of Our Fathers? Prokofiev-walks-the-earth-again of Enemy at the Gates?

    Could it be WW2 is what an artist makes of it?


    I know this, I know it is when I hear it, just as I know a hot woman when I see one.

    Ivanka Trump = HOT (a good WWII film score)

    Lisa Lampanelli = NOT hot (a score like Price's)
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2014
    justin boggan wrote
    franz_conrad wrote
    NP: Fury (Price)

    It is funny to hear the 'hun' associated with such dire chanting over the asteroid ostinati of GRAVITY.

    As to whether the music is appropriate for WW2 or not, I look at the history of music in WW2 movies, and I have no idea what it's meant to sound like. Could it be holy americana chorus and Coplandia of Saving Private Ryan? The New Age + Wagner + Polynesian hymns + Arvo Part of The Thin Red Line? A fusion of spaghetti western Morricone and David Bowie, perhaps (Inglorious Basterds)? The obsessively-repeated sad jazz piano of Flags of Our Fathers? Prokofiev-walks-the-earth-again of Enemy at the Gates?

    Could it be WW2 is what an artist makes of it?


    I know this, I know it is when I hear it, just as I know a hot woman when I see one.

    Ivanka Trump = HOT (a good WWII film score)

    Lisa Lampanelli = NOT hot (a score like Price's)


    confused
    I am extremely serious.
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2014
    What a knob!
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2014 edited
    I just want to be clear, since I was the one that mentioned that Price's score for FURY wasn't appropriate for the time period, that I don't think a big sweeping symphonic score is the RIGHT way to score every film. I'm totally open to different scoring approaches but when I hear drum loops and stuff that sounds like it's out of sci-fi film (or a modern day Bruckheimer blockbuster) in a score that is meant for the 1945 time period, I'm a little thrown off and TURNED off.

    Admittedly, I haven't seen the film and maybe Price's more mechanical, edgy approach works with soldiers driving tanks and blowing shit up in World War II but to these ears I can't listen to FURY and say yeah, that seems appropriate. Just a personal observation.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2014
    I'm surprised they're still making WW2 films more than anything.
  11. NP: Field of Lost Shoes (2014) - Frederik Wiedmann

    Pete wrote on Synchrotones:

    Frederik Wiedmann’s “Field of Lost Shoes” is a gorgeous score. It’s heroic and noble where it needs to be; and it’s reflective where it needs to be. And then, towards the end, it pulls out all the stops and manages to kick an ass or two.


    Craig Richard Lysy wrote on the Filmtracks Scoreboard:

    Frederik Wiedmann caught my ear a while ago with his superb writing for the Green Lantern TV series. This year's Son Of Batman also kicks ass and made me an active follower. Now I recently met him at a signing and I said I hope you get a feature film soon that offers a large canvass to showcase you skills. Well, damn if he did! I have just explored Field Of Lost Shoes and I believe it to be the best thing he has ever written. He provides love, pathos, contemplation and the call to arms in this American Civil War drama. I think the score hits all the right notes and moves into my top five. Check it out. Life is good!


    I agree with the above two fine gentlemen that this is a fantastic score. One of the finest this year so far. It is, in my opinion, up there with Gone with the Wind, Glory and North and South.

    Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.