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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2016
    NP: How To Train Your Dragon - John Powell

    A modern day classic. Check that. A classic... straight up!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  1. Oh yes, it is.
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2016
    Demetris wrote
    Steve Jablonsky - TMNT2

    Apart from: "squirrel formation" "tartatuga brothers" "casey jones" "jump!" "just one sip" "brothers" the rest is headache-inducing unlistenable noise.


    Your taste is impossible to pin down. dizzy I thought you loved Jablosnky? Or just his power anthems?
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2016
    NP : THE ICE STORM - Mychael Danna



    A lovely, atmospheric little score.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
  2. DreamTheater wrote
    PawelStroinski wrote
    Well, that's one part of the equation. ...


    IMO film music as a creative art-form with the purpose of supporting the film AND being a worthwhile standalone experience started to die when Jerry passed on. ...


    I beg to differ. There are, there have been and possibly there will be exceptionally gifted composers who support and elevate the film with their music in every possible way AND will turn this music in a great standalone listening experience on CD.

    But I would not agree that is is the purpose of film music, that is is in the artistic nature of film music to be accessible in itself. If it is, it is a great surplus and the composers have earned our reverence. But it's not what program music is originally made for.

    smile Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2016
    Film music isn't a genre, so it's not as easy to pigeonhole it in a single description. In general, its purpose is to aid the film. But specifically, it's whatever the composer and director decide.
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2016
    ...and of course it's many things to many people.
  3. I bow before your wisdom. bow
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2016
    Very wise of you.
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      CommentAuthorBobdH
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2016 edited
    To have a different perspective of the matter, I believe quality music within the film music spectrum is still very much composed, the problem to me is quite often with the releases. I think a large portion of the enjoyment of film music was how until about 10 years ago, CD releases were carefully created, with selected tracks that stand well on its own and often creating album versions of tracks and suites and stuff. Albums that reach the 70 minutes were the exception, often reserved for those epic scores that cover the whole colourful spectrum of romance, themes, adventure, action, etc., to justify a long release. This is also something the likes of Goldsmith and John Williams were very particular of.

    Sometimes a score is exceptional but just because of its nature it needs a 40 or 50 minute CD presentation. That score nowadays would be thrown on a disc with about 30 minutes of 'filler' music, leaving the overall impression of 'meh, it had its moments, but it drags'.

    Nowadays, however, also as part of the demand to just 'have it all', releases frequently touch that 70 minutes mark and a lot of tracks are around 1 or 2 minutes. They include music that do not necessarily stand on its own outside of the film (so the creation of 'playlist' talk on forums has greatly expanded over the recent years), and the excess of short tracks prevent music from flowing as a listening experience. This is something that has gotten me quite often to step back from film music, with the frustrating thing that I acknowledge there's quite some music out there that I would've enjoyed a lot more (or, at all) if the CD experience would've been done more towards the listener outside of the film.

    I do believe that when composers (especially like Desplat) get the opportunity to record suites of their themes/ideas for the CD release, there'd be a lot less negativity.
  4. Personally I think that has little to do with album length and more to do with the quality of the music composed, what composers are being asked to write and the types of film being made.

    There are many classic scores, previously released as 'short' albums, that are not diminished as a listening experience when presented in an expanded form.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
  5. Yes. 40 minute albums created from special suites and C&C releases (primary or secondary) serve different purposes. Good music carries over 70 minutes.
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2016
    BobdH wrote
    To have a different perspective of the matter, I believe quality music within the film music spectrum is still very much composed, the problem to me is quite often with the releases. I think a large portion of the enjoyment of film music was how until about 10 years ago, CD releases were carefully created, with selected tracks that stand well on its own and often creating album versions of tracks and suites and stuff. Albums that reach the 70 minutes were the exception, often reserved for those epic scores that cover the whole colourful spectrum of romance, themes, adventure, action, etc., to justify a long release. This is also something the likes of Goldsmith and John Williams were very particular of.

    Sometimes a score is exceptional but just because of its nature it needs a 40 or 50 minute CD presentation. That score nowadays would be thrown on a disc with about 30 minutes of 'filler' music, leaving the overall impression of 'meh, it had its moments, but it drags'.

    Nowadays, however, also as part of the demand to just 'have it all', releases frequently touch that 70 minutes mark and a lot of tracks are around 1 or 2 minutes. They include music that do not necessarily stand on its own outside of the film (so the creation of 'playlist' talk on forums has greatly expanded over the recent years), and the excess of short tracks prevent music from flowing as a listening experience. This is something that has gotten me quite often to step back from film music, with the frustrating thing that I acknowledge there's quite some music out there that I would've enjoyed a lot more (or, at all) if the CD experience would've been done more towards the listener outside of the film.

    I do believe that when composers (especially like Desplat) get the opportunity to record suites of their themes/ideas for the CD release, there'd be a lot less negativity.


    A voice of reason amidst the chaos!
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorBobdH
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2016 edited
    Captain Future wrote
    Yes. 40 minute albums created from special suites and C&C releases (primary or secondary) serve different purposes. Good music carries over 70 minutes.


    But that's the thing! I don't consider a score that warrants a 45 minute release any less good than a score that warrants a 70 minute one! It's just different kind of scores that require their own length. For example, I find the Bourne scores brilliant, and their 40 or 50 minute releases are just what they need. They are very action oriented, emphasis on rhythm and intensity which is like a pure shot of adrenaline that shouldn't be watered down by moments of ambience that was needed to fit the film, but shouldn't necessarily be carried over to the album release for standalone listening. If you want to fill a long score album, you have to give the listener a wide range of emotions, and sometimes the film simply doesn't provide this due to its nature.

    Another example, John Williams' War of the Worlds is for me masterful, but if you attack your listener with this vicious music for longer than the album does, you wear them out. While something like Lord of the Rings, which is an incredibly rich tapestry of sounds, emotions, themes etc, that's something that can be listened on long form. It's not focused on one emotion, but ranging from adventure, to suspense, to drama, etc., instead of giving everything to just score or thrill the listener. Does that make the one kind of music better or less good than the other? Of course not, they're completely different, can't be compared, and both brilliant in their own forms.

    Clint Mansell's The Fountain to me is a perfect symphony that is structured perfectly on album during 45 minutes. I'm sure he composed more for the film, I don't know, but I wouldn't want it on that CD. It's perfect as it is.
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      CommentAuthorBobdH
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2016
    FalkirkBairn wrote
    Personally I think that has little to do with album length and more to do with the quality of the music composed, what composers are being asked to write and the types of film being made.

    There are many classic scores, previously released as 'short' albums, that are not diminished as a listening experience when presented in an expanded form.


    Well, there are scores that were released as short albums because that's what the music warranted, and there are scores that were released as short albums because of rights/financial issues. Of all the albums that are now released in expanded forms, there's those that shouldn't have, and those that work very well in their new releases. I think Williams' Indy releases from the box, in their 70 minute versions, were exactly the lengths that were right on that version, same with his Close Encounters. Once I heard those programs, I noticed that that "clicked". And then there're releases that are simply padded with "additional/filler" music for the sake of completion, to simply want to 'have it all', or own that one rendition of a theme you preferred over the album one.

    And like I said, I don't think it's "just" the length, it's also the flow of albums, those numerous short tracks that prevent music from breathing. It's most of the time just a dump of the cue list onto disc and that's it.
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2016
    I think the expanded versions of previously-released scores are something different (you can take or leave them - there's a choice). It's the brand new scores that sometimes sell themselves short by being presented in that format and probably add to the impression that things ain't what they used to be. But this is a very old argument that I've probably contributed far more to than anyone would ever thank me for.
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2016 edited
    Southall wrote
    I think the expanded versions of previously-released scores are something different (you can take or leave them - there's a choice). It's the brand new scores that sometimes sell themselves short by being presented in that format and probably add to the impression that things ain't what they used to be.


    Very true. I wonder how many modern scores would be viewed more favourably if they had the luxury of rearranging and rerecording for an album such as Mancini*, Williams and Goldsmith had right up until the 1980's.

    *I would argue that dear old Henry would be the best argument for expanded releases of original scores considering so many of his albums consisted of easy listening arrangements from scores that had so much more going for them.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
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      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeJun 10th 2016 edited
    DreamTheater wrote
    PawelStroinski wrote
    Well, that's one part of the equation. But you are surely aware that a 2010 film looks and feels differently than, say, a 1995 film? That not just the camera work, but, particularly (as that is crucial in terms of composition) the editing is different?

    Notice how many composers very popular in the 1980s/1990s and who are very well alive don't get work anymore, like Trevor Jones or Robert Folk. Or even younger guys like Edward Shearmur don't do much beyond romantic comedies. Of the masters I can think of two composers who managed to adapt to the new style, one sadly didn't live to the 2010s. While Williams is not doing much now, until his death, Goldsmith still had 3-4 projects going for him every year and unlike, say, Bernstein, they weren't exactly period pieces. I think it also says something.


    IMO film music as a creative art-form with the purpose of supporting the film AND being a worthwile standalone experience started to die when Jerry passed on.

    But what I don't get is that many of the producers nowadays are in their 30s-40s and have grown up with the phenomenal scores in their youth, yet they don't seem to want that in their own productions.


    'Cause they got the impression, or anyway actually created the impression themselves, even without knowing or wanting it, that the 'old' orchestral approach of those phenomenal scores of their youth, won't sell today. And again it's primarily due to Zimmer and his camp again - no matter how much i like some of these scores, for creating and wide-spreading that notion post-2000.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
  6. Yeah I don't have a problem with Zimmer's music, in fact after the main three, John, James & Jerry I would have to put Hans as he is the next in line who gave many brilliant scores from his early years right up until now (but way more during the 90s). smile

    I have a problem with the whole direction in film of 'generic is good enough for this flick, make it sound like it won't stand out amidst the weak dialogue and barrage of sound effects'. Brian Tyler is the guy that gets that approach, he does exactly what is asked of him. He gets many of the projects that used to go to the big guys, who actually made it their job to make the music stand out, especially in the action-adventure genre.
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
  7. The Wind Rises - Joe Hisaishi

    Lovely way to start the morning.
    And not a whiff of derivative, genre-spoiling rot to be found. smile
  8. Captain Future wrote
    NP: Starchaser: The Legend of Orin (1986) - Andrew Belling

    As cheesy as it gets but not without charm. My nostalgia is triggered instantly.

    smile Volker


    Received the BTX CD today. A Williams pastiche with electronics added. The sound is muffled. This is right up my alley so I am perplexed it flew under my radar in 2012. It maybe because I never saw the film and was up to now unaware of its very existence. It seems to be nostalgia's darling over on the splendid island.
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
  9. X-Men: Apocalypse (John Ottman)

    The begin and end are interesting and often good enough, the middle is just downright forgettable. I wonder why I even spotted The Shawshank Redemption, Inception (duh the opening seconds) and Batman Begins (I honestly don't remember which track) in it.

    Ahh at least it was better than the crap that was Days of Future Past
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
  10. NP: TRANCERS (1986) - Mark Ryder, Phil Davies

    80s: Check!
    Electronica: Check!
    SciFi: Check!

    Instant purchase, though I have never seen the Film. It sounds like what Tangerine Dream used to do for films at that time.

    smile Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 11th 2016
    NP : STAR TREK THE MOTION PICTURE - Jerry Goldsmith



    Expanded or original album program, I never tire of this masterpiece.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
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      CommentAuthorAtham
    • CommentTimeJun 11th 2016
    So true! I just played it again today. Never grows old! cool
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2016 edited
    Various Morricone Western Themes

    Past me was a fool not to like Morricone. People love hearing this stuff, as I generally get more comments on this that most other scores I play.

    Heaven. I save 'The Ecstasy of Gold' until last, no matter the compilation.
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2016 edited
    Steven wrote
    Various Morricone Western Themes

    Past me was a fool not to like Morricone. People love hearing this stuff, as I generally get more comments on this that most other scores I play.

    Heaven. I save 'The Ecstasy of Gold' until last, no matter the compilation.


    It always gets a positive response from non-film music fans. Amongst many contenders I think it's arguably the greatest piece of incidental film music written.

    Cripes! I remember a time when you didn't get it. How times change.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2016
    I'm hesitant to name any single score, let alone cue, the greatest of all. But it's certainly up there with the best of them.

    'Didn't get it' is an apt description. I remember being put off by the weird noises and unique sounds, but of course now all that appeals to me.
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 12th 2016
    NP: Dragonheart - Randy Edelman

    Don't play this often, but MY, is this a bundle of fun and a half! And you know you can rely on Edelman for some damn robust orchestration. It helps that I rather enjoy Edelman's way of combining orchestral and synthesised elements, sure, but it wouldn't work half as well if he weren't able to write a proper melody like he does, and imbue his work with some seriously dense gravitas.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  11. Martijn wrote
    I rather enjoy Edelman's way of combining orchestral and synthesised elements

    I guess there had to be at least one. wink