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    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 5th 2008
    Timmer wrote
    As the years go by it's looking less and less likely that we'll all meet up for the big Williams event in Europe ( best bet London ) slant sad


    It is. However, at 30 I'm certainly not too old to travel anywhere. All I need to do is get a regular job with steady income, get myself out of my current, expensive apartment somehow and set off a week, and then I'll be in London or wherever IRRESPECTIVE of Williams' presence. You guys managed to pull off that Bristol thing a couple of months ago. I'm sure something similar can happen again in the future.
    I am extremely serious.
  1. Anthony wrote
    Bregt wrote
    "Williams himself feels too old to come over. He only wants to tour in the USA anymore for concerts."


    Oh...wonderful. "Too old". I'm sorry, but what kind of excuse is that for someone like Williams? slant cry


    In an interview for the film festival in a Belgian magazine he stated it always conflicts with his schedule, he's too busy to come over. He also added maybe next year he'll come.

    But then he'll be even older !!!! angry
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
    •  
      CommentAuthorBregt
    • CommentTimeOct 5th 2008
    What magazine was that Gilles?
    Kazoo
  2. Focus Knack from a week ago. I'll hold on to the copy.
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDreamTheater
    • CommentTimeOct 7th 2008 edited
    I've scanned the interview from the magazine, beware it's in Dutch. I'll try to translate it if people are interested in reading it.

    Part 1: http://img128.imageshack.us/my.php?imag … ew1ju6.jpg

    Part 2: http://img58.imageshack.us/my.php?image … ew2iw0.jpg

    Part 3: http://img353.imageshack.us/my.php?imag … ew3iu0.jpg
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
    •  
      CommentAuthorBregt
    • CommentTimeOct 7th 2008
    Thanks Gilles!
    Kazoo
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 7th 2008
    I want to learn Dutch! (even though, amazingly, I can understand quite a bit of it by just knowing German, English, French and my own language, which has several similarities!).
    I am extremely serious.
  3. Hoe gaat het, Thor? smile
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
  4. Translation of the interview; I've done this to the best of my abilities so excuse me if the sentences don't sound right. Enjoy.


    This year the Film festival honours the world’s greatest film composer John Williams with a unique tribute concert – think ‘Star Wars’, ‘Indiana Jones’ and ‘E.T.’. An exclusive talk with the maestro of the symphonic score, fulltime composer of Steven Spielberg en 45 times Oscar nominee. ‘Regretfully I cannot be present, as such a concert in Gent is a true honour.’

    Saying John Towner Williams – 76 years old – is one of the most influential film composers of all time, is a real understatement. Not only did he write the unforgettable music for Jaws, Star Wars, Superman, Indiana Jones, Schindler’s List and many more, he is also considered to be the godfather of the symphonic score, he has collaborated with Hitchcock, Altman, De Palma and has 45 Oscar nominations under his name, of which he turned 5 into gold statues. Furthermore Williams – who has studied for concert pianist at the famed Juilliard school – wrote several concerto’s, sonatas, a musical and two symphonies, while conducting the Boston Pops Orchestra for years, perhaps known as the most famous symphonic orchestra in the United States.

    While being more or less responsible on his own for the revival of the symphonic film score – with large orchestra and by expansive use of leitmotifs – Williams can hardly be called an ‘overnight sensation’. For years he had to content himself with jobs as session musician and arranger for various television- and film-studios. At the beginning of the 70s he was asked by producer Irwin Allen to score his disaster hits ‘The Poseidon Adventure’, ‘The Towering Inferno’ and ‘Earthquake’. And especially when a young, ambitious individual requested his services to compose the music for his debut ‘The Sugarland Express’. His name? Steven Spielberg. The result is one of the longest and most fruitful collaborations in Tinseltown. A conversation with a – excuse the muted expression – living legend.

    Are you in any way involved with the concert in Gent?
    John Williams: No, but I’m very much aware of it and have written the organisers and musicians a letter of thanks. At the end it’s a great honour, especially for a festival that continues to bring film music to the forefront, that is of high musical quality and has an excellent reputation in Hollywood. Do you want to thank them from me once again?

    With pleasure, they’ve been hoping to have you as a guest for years now.
    Williams: I know. And I would love to visit the city of Gent. Allegedly it’s a gorgeous city. The problem is that I’m always busy and we can never coordinate our agenda’s. Maybe next year.

    The festival focuses on the impact of music in film. Is it an art form that continues to be underestimated?
    Williams: For the latest 20 years, I’ve seen an improvement, also from the domain of traditional classical music. In the past, film composers were seen as professional workers who deliver assembly line work for Hollywood. Or worse: as failed classicists. When I was a student, not a single American university had film technique on their curriculum, let alone were you able to study film music at the academies. That has changed, fortunately. And not because it’s a means of earning a living for many composers. Finally the knowledge is growing that many innovations come from the film business. Plus: film has delivered classical music to millions of people that don’t visit concerts.

    You have called film music as one of the few authentic American art forms.
    Williams: I’d like to nuance that a bit. There has always been tremendous music for film in Europe en definitely during the starting years of Hollywood the impact of foreign composers such as Korngold en Steiner was huge. I mean that film music has influenced other musical genres these past decennia. The typical American aspect of that is that Hollywood – certainly the biggest film industry in the world – has played a major role in that growing process. What started out as a popular cultural product has evolved into an accomplished artistic medium thanks to Hollywood. That is something Americans – who have never depended on a rich cultural history compared to Europeans – always have done: unite high and low forms of art to give popular entertainment an artistic dimension.

    You are trained as a concert pianist and have composed several classical works. Doesn’t it bother you to always be associated with film hits and to be reduced to the master of the heroic score?
    Williams: I don’t have to complain about a lack of recognition. It’s true I have a passion for symphonic material, but if you listen closely, you can hear influences from the avant garde, jazz, musical en rock genres. Do you know the music from ‘Memoirs of a Geisha’? That one is based on traditional Japanese music. It’s definitely not true to feel I’m a victim of my own success, in the sense that people always expect from me a certain type of symphonic score or popular themes. I’ve always been able to explore the full musical spectrum. The thing is, the public really likes my symphonic works, which doesn’t frustrate me. At all. I’m very proud when my music becomes a hit en I always hope my music – even the experimental – will be embraced by the audience. A composer who states he writes music to content his soul and is insensitive to success is a liar.

    Nevertheless you only had your breakthrough during the mid-70s, while already composing for twenty years. Was that because your style of symphonic writing was considerated dated, because at that time people were experimenting a lot with rock and atonal music?
    Williams: Hard to say. You have to be lucky as well. Musical trends depend on the success of a film. If Jaws and Star Wars hadn’t become the hits they are, I doubt we would’ve been hearing so many symphonic scores.

    Remarkable: You never read the script when composing a score.
    Williams: I prefer to watch the film in a more or less finished state, to be able to have an honest opinion and to react spontaneously just like a regular member of the audience. This way you can feel the rhythm of the whole much better.

    So you never enter a screening room full of musical ideas in your head?
    Williams: That happens, but I like to let the ideas flow out of the film. The most important thing about a film score is that the tempo is dependent on the editing. Music can change the tone of a scene fundamentally. Put slightly faster or slower violins during the action scenes in Jaws and out goes the suspense, no matter how good the film is. The problem is that some films – especially those with a lot of special effects – don’t allow having an idea of the general rhythm. Some cuts are shortened, others lengthened. And you have to play on that aspect. I compare it to horse riding. A jockey who moves along with the horse’s running doesn’t feel it, but moves on forward. An audience shouldn’t feel the music, but must be propelled by the action, where music and editing together determine the rhythm.

    What would you call a good score?
    Williams: It has to be complimentary and be supportive, but not insistent or intellectually overbearing. Ideally it has to exist as a musical piece on its own. I do not agree with the notion that good film music should not be heard. You have to find a balance between underlying discretion and artistic originality.

    Did the digital revolution change you way of working?
    Williams: Not really. I still use pen and paper and I still work with flesh and blood musicians. I’m a dinosaur in that way. In a studio everything happens digitally and frames and tempos are monitored by the computer. That’s a job for the engineers. Nothing has changed about working with the director. He still expresses his ideas and together we try to make the most organic score. At times I can determine how long a frame lasts, but I have nothing to say about choice of shots. I don’t mean to. A film composer must respect the integrity of the director at all times, regardless of his own opinion of the film.

    You have scored nearly all the films of Steven Spielberg. Did you know when you started out this would lead to a special partnership?
    Williams: Something like that grows naturally. But when I saw ‘The Sugerland Express’, I knew immediately he would become somebody special. Concerning my relation with Steven, I’m just a very lucky guy. When he first asked me, I wasn’t well known, but he did like my score for ‘The Reivers’ so much he wanted to work with me no matter what. That appreciation – both musically and personally – has always existed fortunately and is still mutual. As long as my health remains, I hope to keep on working with Steven.

    On top of that you’ve worked with such established personalities as Hitchcock, De Palma and Altman. Has it always been hassle-free?
    Williams: I’ve never felt restrained artistically, even with the most demanding directors. If the result wasn’t all that, it was mainly because I failed. I’ll never put the fault with the director. Most stories about so called difficult directors are exaggerated. When I wrote Hitchcock’s final film ‘Family Plot’, I got to know the man as a pleasant individual from whom I’ve learned much. You want to hear juicy stories about the time he tried to tyrannise me, you won’t hear a word from me. (laughs)

    So far you’ve gathered 45 Oscar nominations. Do you ever get used to the success?
    Williams: No. Try to compare it to being a fan of your favourite football team. If your team has won for the 45th time, you want them to win a 46th time. I’m still every bit as ambitious and insecure as when I started.

    You’ve influenced numerous composers, but who has actually inspired you?
    Williams: The older I get, the further I go back in time. Lately I find my self spending time with Haydn and Bach, but I used to be crazy about the modern Russian and English composers. Stravinsky, Prokofiev and Sjostakovich. And Elgar and Vaugh-Williams.

    You don’t appear much on premieres and rarely give interviews. Are you the prototype of the somewhat media-shy artist?
    Williams: (puzzled) What makes you think that? When I was conducting the Boston Pops Orchestra, I was all around the place giving interviews and when Steven asks me to do something for a DVD, I mostly say ‘yes’. I just don’t feel the urge to be in the spotlights always and everywhere I go. I’m no movie star, just a hardworking professional with only a little bit of talent. Glamour performances I leave to the more handsome men such as Sean Connery. (laughs)
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
    •  
      CommentAuthoromaha
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008 edited
    Thank you for a very interesting interview Gilles.
    Or the translation that made it easier for me, haha wink
    •  
      CommentAuthorNautilus
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008
    Christodoulides wrote
    I love Jordi's "......" everytime a word comes up that has to do with "owning" "CDs" biggrin


    Yeah! i had some cd's in my house....Until I thought : wait! Why i have to buy a cd where sometimes the running time is not even close to the 30 minutes? or Why i have to buy cd's when the music I heard in the film is not in the cd?

    Then My head starting to think, and my pc starting to burn tongue
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008
    hahaha indeed!
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemonStar
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008
    That's nice, Gilles! Thanks! beer
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008
    Very enjoyable. Thanks Gilles. smile
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008
    Thanks a lot for the translation, DreamTheater!

    How can you NOT love a guy such as Williams?
    I am extremely serious.
  5. No problem guys. I just wasn't sure to put it here or in the Film festival topic... But as more people stop by here it makes sense to put it in the Williams thread.
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
    •  
      CommentAuthorNautilus
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008
    KOTCS is being realeased in his complete form too?
  6. don't say you did this when working eh? wink
    Thanks still bro
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
    •  
      CommentAuthoromaha
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008
    Nautilus wrote
    KOTCS is being realeased in his complete form too?


    No, I wish...
    • CommentAuthorAnthony
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008
    omaha wrote
    Nautilus wrote
    KOTCS is being realeased in his complete form too?


    No, I wish...


    I'm not too fussed, but it would have been nice. I'd like to have the warehouse escape music as well as the complete Jungle Chase.
  7. Anthony wrote
    omaha wrote
    Nautilus wrote
    KOTCS is being realeased in his complete form too?


    No, I wish...


    I'm not too fussed, but it would have been nice. I'd like to have the warehouse escape music as well as the complete Jungle Chase.


    true, these should have been included or replaced various other pieces confused
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
    • CommentAuthorAnthony
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008
    Thomas Glorieux wrote
    Anthony wrote
    omaha wrote
    Nautilus wrote
    KOTCS is being realeased in his complete form too?


    No, I wish...


    I'm not too fussed, but it would have been nice. I'd like to have the warehouse escape music as well as the complete Jungle Chase.


    true, these should have been included or replaced various other pieces confused


    Yup. WAY too much ambient music on the soundtrack.
  8. Anthony wrote
    Thomas Glorieux wrote
    Anthony wrote
    omaha wrote
    Nautilus wrote
    KOTCS is being realeased in his complete form too?


    No, I wish...


    I'm not too fussed, but it would have been nice. I'd like to have the warehouse escape music as well as the complete Jungle Chase.


    true, these should have been included or replaced various other pieces confused


    Yup. WAY too much ambient music on the soundtrack.


    don't get me wrong, the ambient music must be on it to space out all the action, but they could have replaced indeed several with the more rousing material

    and I still hate how the score begins, why the march if you could have begun with the intruiging warehouse cue angry
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
    • CommentAuthorAnthony
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008
    Thomas Glorieux wrote
    Anthony wrote
    Thomas Glorieux wrote
    Anthony wrote
    omaha wrote
    Nautilus wrote
    KOTCS is being realeased in his complete form too?


    No, I wish...


    I'm not too fussed, but it would have been nice. I'd like to have the warehouse escape music as well as the complete Jungle Chase.


    true, these should have been included or replaced various other pieces confused


    Yup. WAY too much ambient music on the soundtrack.


    don't get me wrong, the ambient music must be on it to space out all the action, but they could have replaced indeed several with the more rousing material

    and I still hate how the score begins, why the march if you could have begun with the intruiging warehouse cue angry


    E-x-a-c-t-l-y! cool
    •  
      CommentAuthoromaha
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008
    Anthony wrote
    Thomas Glorieux wrote
    Anthony wrote
    Thomas Glorieux wrote
    Anthony wrote
    omaha wrote
    Nautilus wrote
    KOTCS is being realeased in his complete form too?


    No, I wish...


    I'm not too fussed, but it would have been nice. I'd like to have the warehouse escape music as well as the complete Jungle Chase.


    true, these should have been included or replaced various other pieces confused


    Yup. WAY too much ambient music on the soundtrack.


    don't get me wrong, the ambient music must be on it to space out all the action, but they could have replaced indeed several with the more rousing material

    and I still hate how the score begins, why the march if you could have begun with the intruiging warehouse cue angry


    E-x-a-c-t-l-y! cool


    I third this one. As if we didn't have enough recordings of the Raiders March. Plus, neither the second or third scores start with the march.
    • CommentAuthorAnthony
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008 edited
    *too many quotes so stopping*

    I also dislike the end credits big time. Why include Marion's them AGAIN? Erik's edit is a million times better.
    •  
      CommentAuthoromaha
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008
    Anthony wrote
    *too many quotes so stopping*

    I also dislike the end credits big time. Why include Marion's them AGAIN? Erik's edit is a million times better.


    The thing I love about the end creidts is the new take on the Raiders March in the end.
  9. indeed, the great thing about Temple and Crusade is how they begin without the march. For me that's why they work so good as representation of the movie. The first and fourth feel more like concert CD's

    Stick to the original order of the cues I say angry
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
  10. you know, if they start the concert this sunday with the march, I'm gonna kick someone's ass, and poor Bregt is just besides me (be warned Bregt) biggrin
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2008
    Thomas Glorieux wrote
    you know, if they start the concert this sunday with the march, I'm gonna kick someone's ass, and poor Bregt is just besides me (be warned Bregt) biggrin


    But what a way to start a concert!

    Anyway, guys, there is a HUGE thread dedicated to the music of Indiana Jones. I know this is a John Williams thread but let's not have to seperate discussions about the same topic.

    http://www.maintitles.net/forum/discuss … ollection/

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!