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  1. DreamTheater wrote
    Hey I never said those that you mentioned are great and better than what came out recently. I just choose to listen to my favorites from the past way more frequently, as my interest in what comes out now has taken a serious nosedive, I practically don't buy new CD's anymore, the only ones I keep buying physically are the expanded special editions, because that's where my major interest in music lies (and always will). I'm not hurting anyone by doing that, correct? wink

    Only yourself. tongue

    I do understand you - I had actually determined to spend more time exploring older music this year than keeping up with what's new, but circumstances led to me actually listening to less music overall instead sadly. But do yourself a favor, keep an ear to the ground - listen to what people have to say here and elsewhere - check out Erik's year end show, or the top lists published at Movie Wave, Filmtracks, Movie Music UK, whoever you trust most - and listen to at least five scores per year. You simply miss out on way too much not doing that.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2016
    Edmund Meinerts wrote


    I do understand you - I had actually determined to spend more time exploring older music this year than keeping up with what's new, but circumstances led to me actually listening to less music overall instead sadly. But do yourself a favor, keep an ear to the ground - listen to what people have to say here and elsewhere - check out Erik's year end show, or the top lists published at Movie Wave, Filmtracks, Movie Music UK, whoever you trust most - and listen to at least five scores per year. You simply miss out on way too much not doing that.


    I see you conveniently left off my year end show there.... wink
    I am extremely serious.
  2. Maybe he trusts you most!
  3. Erik Woods wrote
    Thomas Glorieux wrote
    I think James and you (and definitely others) gave it 5 stars because you realized at that moment that you didn't hear proper adventure music like that anymore today, and you immediately realized it was one of the best things you heard that very same year. Or like my brother put it "compare it to the scores of today... it deserves 7.5 stars that way !"


    Eeeh! Sorry Thomas, wrong guess. Would you like to go for Double Jeopardy where the scores can really change?

    -Erik-


    I would guess themes
    waaaaaahhhhhhhh!!! Where's my nut? arrrghhhhhhh
  4. Edmund Meinerts wrote
    DreamTheater wrote
    Hey I never said those that you mentioned are great and better than what came out recently. I just choose to listen to my favorites from the past way more frequently, as my interest in what comes out now has taken a serious nosedive, I practically don't buy new CD's anymore, the only ones I keep buying physically are the expanded special editions, because that's where my major interest in music lies (and always will). I'm not hurting anyone by doing that, correct? wink

    Only yourself. tongue

    I do understand you - I had actually determined to spend more time exploring older music this year than keeping up with what's new, but circumstances led to me actually listening to less music overall instead sadly. But do yourself a favor, keep an ear to the ground - listen to what people have to say here and elsewhere - check out Erik's year end show, or the top lists published at Movie Wave, Filmtracks, Movie Music UK, whoever you trust most - and listen to at least five scores per year. You simply miss out on way too much not doing that.


    That's not how I see it... I'm still discovering new music, but it's in completely different genres. My tastes have changed, and I'm finding hidden treasures from before I was born, right up until now.

    For instance, in 2007, Dream Theater (prog rock / metal band) which is now my favorite band ever, these guys write 24 minute epics like Williams wrote The Battle of Hoth.
    And in 2014, Pink Floyd, which I've always dismissed when I was younger (too psychedelic, but I love them now).
    And a select few classical composers.

    Plus the fact, that there's only so many hours in the day to listen to all that brilliance. So I make a choice, and that choice has never made me feel bad in any way...

    In the end we all listen to what we like the most.
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
  5. Edmund Meinerts wrote

    Don't try and tell me Red Heat or Mr. Baseball or Romancing the Stone are better scores than The Force Awakens or Wolf Totem or Jupiter Ascending just because they're from "the good old days".


    Well it's easy to compare some of the worst scores of an entire decade with some of the best scores of 2015 to make your point, but you must admit that film music is different than it used to be. Many of us have a tendency to think that the music from films when we grew up, or when we first discovered film music is better, because that's what we fell in in love with. And it can be easy to remember the past through rose-colored glasses, since we only listen to our favorite things from the past, and yes, it's true that there are good and bad scores every year. But film music changes over time. Films in any given genre today are scored different than films in those genres were scores in decades past (with some exceptions). Take action films. In the 80s, action films were big, dumb, and manly, and generally much more violent than action films are today. Today they are slick and produced for a younger audience (to make more money). In the 80s they were scored by Goldsmith, Horner, Poledouris, etc. Today they are often scored by someone with ties to Hans Zimmer, or maybe Brian Tyler, etc., and the music has followed the trends of the film industry. Gone are the big cheesy themes (for the most part), in favor of something more slick and less in-your-face. Obviously, this is not always true, and we had some great music in actions films this year, but if you love the music of action films past, the new stuff probably isn't going to do as much for you. You could do the same kind of comparison with superhero films of the past and present and the music is very different.

    You're a fan of themes, Edmund, and appreciate leitmotif. I often see you arguing that those kinds of scores are still being written, and they are, but the use of memorable themes in film music, though it still exists, is not what it used to be. It seems like there were a lot more scores in the 80s and 90s that had a very obvious main theme (and often a love theme, or other theme(s)) than there are today.

    I'm just trying to make a point here, and my point is not that film music today is bad - my point is that it has changed generally. Surely you'll concede that point? You are the loudest champion I know of that there is quality film music being written today, Edmund, and that's great. There is really good film music being written today. But the philosophy of how music should be used in film has changed from what it was 2-3 decades ago (which was also different from what it was in the decades before that).
  6. ^ Post of the day !
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2016 edited
    Personally, I don't think it's possible to generalize to the extent you're doing, christopher. You can try to identify certain trends, of course, but then you need to be very specific (for example talking about 'general musical tendencies in contemporary Hollywood action movies' etc.). I've seen 150 films from 2015 and listened to around 400 scores from the year. The diversity is absolutely stunning.

    My guess from what you write is that you base your argument on a rather narrow segment (the Hollywood action film), and then generalize from that. But even that narrow segment will lead you into trouble pretty quickly. For every more generic AVENGERS/Tyler score you find, there's also a THE MAN FROM UNCLE by Daniel Pemberton.
    I am extremely serious.
  7. christopher wrote
    Well it's easy to compare some of the worst scores of an entire decade with some of the best scores of 2015 to make your point,

    Yes, and it's something that's done the other way around just as (if not more) frequently. "The evolution of film music is a pretty sad thing from Miklos Rozsa and Alfred Newman to Ramin Djawadi and Henry Jackman" I think James said once, or something along those lines once...well yeah, I won't dispute that, but you could just as easily draw an arbitrary line from, I dunno, Harald Faltermeyer or John Carpenter to Alexandre Desplat and argue the opposite. I couldn't name a Golden Age composer generally considered "bad", but that's probably to do with the fact that they and their scores have been forgotten (or never released), not that they don't exist at all.

    But you make excellent points, and I certainly won't disagree. Of course film music has changed. I won't even argue that it's changed for the better. But nothing irritates me more than "modern film music is terrible" diatribes (not that this is what DT was doing, mind you; at least he keeps a positive "old film music is great" attitude rather than its negative opposite, but the sentiment is still there). As with all things, a bit of balance and perspective is necessary. smile
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      CommentAuthorchristopher
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2016 edited
    Thor wrote
    Personally, I don't think it's possible to generalize to the extent you're doing, christopher. You can try to identify certain trends, of course, but then you need to be very specific (for example talking about 'general musical tendencies in contemporary Hollywood action movies' etc.). I've seen 150 films from 2015 and listened to around 400 scores from the year. The diversity is absolutely stunning.

    My guess from what you write is that you base your argument on a rather narrow segment (the Hollywood action film), and then generalize from that. But even that narrow segment will lead you into trouble pretty quickly. For every more generic AVENGERS/Tyler score you find, there's also a THE MAN FROM UNCLE by Daniel Pemberton.


    You're right. I'm being very general, though I'm familiar with music from a lot of films outside of Hollywood (since film music is a greater passion for me than film itself). I guess it's easier to discuss the bigger films, though. I will say that the music from this year's big Hollywood action films seems far more varied and interesting than any other recent year that I can remember.

    You're much more familiar with film than I am, Thor. I won't try to go toe-to-toe with you. smile

    Edmund Meinerts wrote
    christopher wrote
    Well it's easy to compare some of the worst scores of an entire decade with some of the best scores of 2015 to make your point,

    Yes, and it's something that's done the other way around just as (if not more) frequently. "The evolution of film music is a pretty sad thing from Miklos Rozsa and Alfred Newman to Ramin Djawadi and Henry Jackman" I think James said once, or something along those lines once...well yeah, I won't dispute that, but you could just as easily draw an arbitrary line from, I dunno, Harald Faltermeyer or John Carpenter to Alexandre Desplat and argue the opposite. I couldn't name a Golden Age composer generally considered "bad", but that's probably to do with the fact that they and their scores have been forgotten (or never released), not that they don't exist at all.

    But you make excellent points, and I certainly won't disagree. Of course film music has changed. I won't even argue that it's changed for the better. But nothing irritates me more than "modern film music is terrible" diatribes (not that this is what DT was doing, mind you; at least he keeps a positive "old film music is great" attitude rather than its negative opposite, but the sentiment is still there). As with all things, a bit of balance and perspective is necessary. smile


    Agreed, on all points.
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJan 30th 2016
  8. Great to see the Horner Review Odyssey return! smile
  9. Even though I enjoy the hell out of the previous release, the prospect of having The Pagemaster in better sound was too good to pass up.
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
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      CommentAuthorAtham
    • CommentTimeJan 31st 2016
    Indeed. The new release sounds great!
  10. Magnificent news:
    http://filmmusicreporter.com/2016/03/11 … ent-seven/
    The views and opinions of Ford A. Thaxton are his own and do not necessarily reflect the ones of ANYONE else.
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2016
    Atham wrote
    Indeed. The new release sounds great!


    Sounds EXACTLY the same as the old release!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  11. Yeah, the booklet and liner notes are maybe the only thing the new release has going for it. Not sure now why I bought it again, I was tricked into the 'remastered sound' tag line.

    But hey, everytime a Horner is released we should be glad now, right?
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2016
    DreamTheater wrote
    But hey, everytime a Horner is released we should be glad now, right?


    Well, depends. If a score already has a sufficient release, and that release is easy to come by, I don't see the need for another edition.

    But there are still some completely unreleased Horner works from the past, so we still have a few years of "new" Horner music to look forward to, should these works be found and/or released.
    I am extremely serious.
  12. That's what I meant, seeing we won't be getting anything new anymore (upcoming scores), that everything that will see a release will keep him sort of alive, just like with Jerry.
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
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      CommentAuthorLSH
    • CommentTimeMar 12th 2016 edited
    justin boggan wrote
    Magnificent news:
    http://filmmusicreporter.com/2016/03/11 … ent-seven/


    Wow, that's a pleasant surprise. Seems it's true then, that Horner did prepare a decent amount of material for the film. Franglan seems like an odd choice to adapt it but his relationship with Horner was very close since Titanic - and I do hope that more of Horner's regular staff work on this too. Faith temporarily restored in the studios for allowing this!
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeMar 29th 2016
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeApr 1st 2016
  13. Finally, he tackles the composer's seminal masterpiece!
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2016
    A little review of a little score that nobody but me seems to like, Once Around (1991):

    http://www.movie-wave.net/once-around/
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2016
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2016
    Here's a four-minute piece I recorded last year for a radio show tribute to Horner, in which I sound incredibly pretentious, but hey-ho:

    http://www.movie-wave.net/wp-content/up … Horner.m4a
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2016
    Great to put a voice to the face!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2016
    It sounded more emotional than pretentious James. I can say you sound much more relaxed than that in the flesh.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
  14. yeah I also was under the impression, that you had to concentrate on keeping a steady voice, James. The emotions translated right to me while listening. smile

    Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2016
    I agree I sound emotional, but I really don't know why.