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  1. Everyone acknowledges Korngold as being one of the true greats in film scoring and there's little "discussion" from people who have opposing views on Korngold and his music.

    To perhaps get things going a bit...I've not even considered getting the recent re-recording of The Prince and The Pauper. I'm quite happy with the selections I have from other sources.

    When considering what classic scores to re-record there needs to be a balance between what is likely to be commerically viable and what's worthy of a treatment because it's not so well-known but needs a faithful re-recording.

    Korngold's style tends to leave me stunned (and sometimes not in a good way), particularly when he's scoring in his swashbuckling mode.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2009
    Steven wrote
    (Bare with me here!)


    Oh Steven. I didn't know you cared!
    (But apparently you're a regular care bare).
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJun 20th 2009
    Hmm, seems that word is my Achilles' heal? wink

    Terrible joke. shame
    •  
      CommentAuthorfommes
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2009
    Steven wrote
    What is there to discuss about Korngold? Problem is, he was a genius. (Bare with me here!)

    A genius such as Korngold is less likely to cause differences of opinions. Most people will agree he was a genius, which creates even less discussion. Then of course there's the fact that he's been dead for quite a while and not producing scores anymore, so even less "breaking Korngold news" (only in the form of rerecordings and the like, which is still relatively few and far between). Then there's the fact that this board is primarily into newer scores. Whether that's good or bad is beside the point, it just happens to be the case.

    So we're left to discuss either how much we love his scores, which will either consist of one sentence praising (which will mostly incur in the NP threads), or lengthy analyses of the finer technical qualities of his music (which tends to take a lot of musical know-how that not everyone, including myself, has). Since the latter takes a lot of effort and the former is reserved for the few on this board that are familiar with Korngold, I'm not surprised we only have few posts in this thread.

    Well, that's my theory anyway.


    That, or his track titles are just not funny enough.
  2. Which brings me to a stupid question.

    Did any of the Golden Age composers make fun with track titles?

    When it comes to Korngold, I need to be in the mood for his music.
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
  3. Steven wrote
    Hmm, seems that word is my Achilles' heal? wink

    Terrible joke. shame


    Not so terrible lol
    http://www.filmmusic.pl - Polish Film Music Review Website
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2009
    ^
    There's always one.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    •  
      CommentAuthorAtham
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2009
    I adore all of Korgold's music. Including his concert works.
    I love The Prince And The Pauper just released by Tribute Film Classics!
    A beautifully produced album on virtually all counts.
    However, I do find this new recording a little bit, shall we say, "tinny".
    The cymbals and some brass show this "pinched" sound up the most.
    It first hit me when I played the main title and I almost thought I was listening to an mediocre MP3.
    I soon adapted to the sound and totally embraced this wonderful (and brilliantly performed) release.
    Is my audio perception just screwy here or am I right in saying this?
    I have all the Tribute albums and I'm thoroughly grateful to the wonderful team behind them.
    So I feel a little bad criticizing the sound of this album.
    Like I said before, I love it. Korngold was a giant in his field!
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2009
    Atham wrote
    I adore all of Korgold's music. Including his concert works.
    I love The Prince And The Pauper just released by Tribute Film Classics!
    A beautifully produced album on virtually all counts.
    However, I do find this new recording a little bit, shall we say, "tinny".
    The cymbals and some brass show this "pinched" sound up the most.
    It first hit me when I played the main title and I almost thought I was listening to an mediocre MP3.
    I soon adapted to the sound and totally embraced this wonderful (and brilliantly performed) release.
    Is my audio perception just screwy here or am I right in saying this?
    I have all the Tribute albums and I'm thoroughly grateful to the wonderful team behind them.
    So I feel a little bad criticizing the sound of this album.
    Like I said before, I love it. Korngold was a giant in his field!


    I would express your opinion to tribute directly
    listen to more classical music!
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2009
    What's the one (or two) absolute MUST-HAVE scores by the composer, who are available in newer re-recordings of far better sound quality than the originals? Thanks.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2009 edited
    Oooh, excellent question!

    My top two Korngold scores, scores that I literally would not want to live without, are The Sea Hawk and The Adventures of Robin Hood. But mostly The Sea Hawk.

    I'd go for the Stromberg recordings of both personally, but the best versions of either score in suite form you will ever hear is Gerhardt's versions. The 15 minute long suite of The Sea Hawk on the Korngold/Gerhardt album is stunning, in both music and recording.
    • CommentAuthormarkrayen
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2009
    ^

    What he said!

    When I was in Boston a few weeks ago I heard John Williams conducting excerpts from Adventures of Robin Hood in Symphony Hall. The music is exceptionally well orchestrated, and I sat on the first row right in front of the 1st desk of the violin section and noticed the remarkable efficiency of each bow stroke the man wrote. He could sure orchestrate. cool

    Of concert works the number one thing he ever did must be his violin concerto for Jascha Heifetz. I own the score and worship every note of it!
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2009
    The Sea Wolf is also excellent but as has been said it's got to be the Morgan & Stromberg 'Hood' and 'Hawk'.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2009
    Steven; my man beer
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2009
    I would definitely advise to begin with the Gerhardt suites and then move onto the full scores. I have an inkling you won't get on with the full scores (who knows?), but I'm almost certain you'll enjoy the Gerhardt suites. smile
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2009
    :want:
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 21st 2009
    As far as Robin Hood is concerned, I'd recommend the Kojian rerecording on Varese, which is probably the easiest digestible version around: not too long, yet not integrated into a full-length suite. It's the one I get most mileage out of!
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2009
    Sea Wolf is a personal favorite because of the dark nature of the piece.

    http://www.classicsonline.com/catalogue … pid=445241
    listen to more classical music!
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2009
    Christodoulides wrote
    :want:


    Give'em a test run!
    http://www.geocities.com/cinematicsound/gerhardt.html

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2009
    sdtom wrote
    Sea Wolf is a personal favorite because of the dark nature of the piece.

    http://www.classicsonline.com/catalogue … pid=445241


    You and I were the only one's to mention it Tom cool beer
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
  4. Steven wrote
    What is there to discuss about Korngold? Problem is, he was a genius. (Bare with me here!)

    A genius such as Korngold is less likely to cause differences of opinions. Most people will agree he was a genius, which creates even less discussion.


    Let us not pretend that it has anything to do with people's opinions about the music. The truth is, many of the crowd on this message board wouldn't know Korngold if he scored their death scene, much less devote any interest to him if he wasn't attached to a big shiny new movie. wink
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2009
    Erik Woods wrote
    Christodoulides wrote
    :want:


    Give'em a test run!
    http://www.geocities.com/cinematicsound/gerhardt.html

    -Erik-


    Thanks!
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJun 22nd 2009
    franz_conrad wrote
    Let us not pretend that it has anything to do with people's opinions about the music. The truth is, many of the crowd on this message board wouldn't know Korngold if he scored their death scene, much less devote any interest to him if he wasn't attached to a big shiny new movie. wink


    As this American would say "You hit the nail on the head." Let me give you some additional information. Since I've been working on the review of "The Prince and the Pauper" I've found that people have never heard of Korngold, have no idea it was written by Twain, and didn't know Flynn was in the film. I would venture to say that more people interested in classical music know who Korngold is. I agree that some of us know and appreciate the contribution he made.
    Thomas
    listen to more classical music!
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJun 23rd 2009
    http://www.naxos.com/naxos/countries/uk/

    This is the link for the 6-2009 release of the new Violin Concerto recording of Korngold.
    Thomas
    listen to more classical music!
    •  
      CommentAuthorAtham
    • CommentTimeJun 24th 2009
    sdtom wrote
    http://www.naxos.com/naxos/countries/uk/

    This is the link for the 6-2009 release of the new Violin Concerto recording of Korngold.
    Thomas


    Ordered!

    Thanks for the link Tom! beer
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJun 24th 2009
    sdtom wrote
    http://www.naxos.com/naxos/countries/uk/

    This is the link for the 6-2009 release of the new Violin Concerto recording of Korngold.
    Thomas


    I'm listening this morning and its really a wonderful experience if you've any interest in classical material at all. The third movement of the violin concerto is the Prince and Pauper theme, well developed.
    Thomas
    listen to more classical music!
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJun 27th 2009
    in the home stretch of the review of the prince and the pauper
    listen to more classical music!
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2009
    sdtom wrote
    in the home stretch of the review of the prince and the pauper


    What?
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2009
    Translated to European (i.e. non-baseball) terms: "almost done".
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorsdtom
    • CommentTimeJun 28th 2009
    Thanks Martijn
    Thomas
    listen to more classical music!