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  1. Edmund Meinerts wrote
    Suffice it to say I completely disagree with that assessment. I don't particularly want to turn this into yet another discussion of the Hobbit scores (whose lukewarm reception I continue to be completely befuddled by, but I've more or less made my peace with that...I just wish people would acknowledge the strengths those scores undeniably have even if they personally don't like them). And other than that, his career right now is pretty similar to his career pre-LOTR - quite a bit of difficult, brooding stuff with the occasional drama. I really don't see that much of a difference or drop-off in quality.


    yeah All of it.
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2014 edited
    Edmund Meinerts wrote
    I don't particularly want to turn this into yet another discussion of the Hobbit scores (whose lukewarm reception I continue to be completely befuddled by, but I've more or less made my peace with that...I just wish people would acknowledge the strengths those scores undeniably have even if they personally don't like them).


    In all seriousness, I just don't see the strengths. Sorry. I really don't.
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2014
    There are some great moments but these scores are nowhere near his work on the three LOTR scores.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
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      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2014 edited
    Edmund Meinerts wrote
    Suffice it to say I completely disagree with that assessment. I don't particularly want to turn this into yet another discussion of the Hobbit scores (whose lukewarm reception I continue to be completely befuddled by, but I've more or less made my peace with that...I just wish people would acknowledge the strengths those scores undeniably have even if they personally don't like them). And other than that, his career right now is pretty similar to his career pre-LOTR - quite a bit of difficult, brooding stuff with the occasional drama. I really don't see that much of a difference or drop-off in quality.


    Well pre-LOTR, he experimented. He got emotional, strong scores, very focused. THE CELL, THE YARDS (Gorgeous), Crash, the Game, panic room, spider, dogma....now it feels kinda lost in-between styles, lower budgets, synths that don't really express him, or orchestral music without the drive, to the border of simple wallpaper music (hobbit score 2 etc) which he never wrote in the past, at least it's how it feels and sounds to me.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
  2. Every now and then there's been an interesting score in the last 10 years. I think COSMOPOLIS and THE DEPARTED in particular would be standouts for me. HISTORY OF VIOLENCE and EASTERN PROMISES also. Some people love HUGO.

    One thing that wouldn't have helped the HOBBIT scores is that many people fall in love with film music when a particular moment happens at an emotionally satisfying point in the storytelling. That even for people who collect this music, they're not immune to what it is the music is helping, and the emotion of that rubs off on the music. Because the HOBBIT films rarely rise above feeling like a lesser-stakes, heightened return to LORD OF THE RINGS, the music probably gets caught in the same whirlpool.

    I don't know if it's entirely that for me. The murky recording of the Middle Earth scores, and the amount of time spent with low strings / woods / brass murmuring away so dialogue and effects can ring out over the top, produces a colourless sound that is simply not exciting to my ears. I can't say I think the spotting is particularly strong, but the very music is dull for large stretches. I can take 3 hours of the highlights of it, but Shore isn't that robust a composer that he can keep surprising within this palette. (And I think the diversity of sounds across his many scores are a clue -- much of his creative contribution comes in the choice of palette.)
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
  3. franz_conrad wrote
    (...)
    I don't know if it's entirely that for me. The murky recording of the Middle Earth scores, and the amount of time spent with low strings / woods / brass murmuring away so dialogue and effects can ring out over the top, produces a colourless sound that is simply not exciting to my ears. I can't say I think the spotting is particularly strong, but the very music is dull for large stretches. I can take 3 hours of the highlights of it, but Shore isn't that robust a composer that he can keep surprising within this palette. (And I think the diversity of sounds across his many scores are a clue -- much of his creative contribution comes in the choice of palette.)


    This is entirely for me. The glorious recording of the Middle Earth scores, the wonderful low strings / woods / brass creating a mythic sound floor, enhancing the pathos of the dialogue produces a sound so complex as anything I have heard in the world of classical and incidental music. This music never ceases to amaze me. Shore is so distinguished a composer that I can hear hours upon hours of his Middle Earth music. Yet the commercial albums of the Ring Trilogy remain the defining presentation of it. By limmiting his choices he creates a musical language as distinct as any classical composer, as iconic as Morricone's Western and Williams' space opera. Within this pattern there is an abundance of creativity. Much of his thematic diversity is revealed only in detail and demands close attention. This is espially true for the HOBBIT scores which, in terms of symphonic complexity and diversity, sometimes are even superior to the RING scores.

    smile Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
  4. Well at least I can tell what's playing the music in Morricone's westerns. And he didn't have half the recording budget...

    But as they say, one man's molehill is another man's mountain. Funnily enough you quoted the paragraph that said why I didn't like the HOBBIT scores, which I think is less interesting than why everyone else doesn't. wink
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
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      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2014
    HISTORY OF VIOLENCE and EASTERN PROMISES are lovely indeed. 2 small breaks of glimpse post LOTR, in otherwise mediocrity.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
    •  
      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeOct 11th 2014
    I thought The Departed was very good, also Hugo.
  5. Demetris wrote
    Well pre-LOTR, he experimented.

    You don't call scores like Cosmopolis or Maps to the Stars experimental?
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeOct 15th 2014 edited
    Timmer wrote
    It's a good film and Shore's score captures and creates the atmosphere brilliantly. The film is only let down by some truly cringe worthy moments of "acting" by Brad Pitt who has improved a lot since then.


    Eh? I missed this. I don't agree at all. I think Pitt is fabulous in this movie. And I never thought he needed any improvement... Ok, maybe on accents, which he can't do to save his life, but I think Pitt is an excellent actor. Some of his early work is inspiring (i.e. - 12 Monkeys)

    Where exactly are Pitt's faults in Seven?!?!?

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeOct 16th 2014
    There a few moments I vaguely remember, I'd have to watch the film again ( not a bad idea ) but the main one is his acting during the final sequence with the box. Dreadful IMO.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
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      CommentAuthorFalkirkBairn
    • CommentTimeOct 16th 2014 edited
    Timmer wrote
    There a few moments I vaguely remember, I'd have to watch the film again ( not a bad idea ) but the main one is his acting during the final sequence with the box. Dreadful IMO.

    I do think that there's something not quite right with his reactions in the "will I, won't I, will I, won't I" sequence in that final scene, but I give him a bit of leeway because of the difficult conditions he's under and not knowing how anyone would react to that situation.

    But it doesn't spoil the scene - nor the film - for me though.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeOct 16th 2014
    Glad to hear it.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
  6. I'm pleased that it makes you happy.
    The views expressed in this post are entirely my own and do not reflect the opinions of maintitles.net, or for that matter, anyone else. http://www.racksandtags.com/falkirkbairn
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeOct 16th 2014 edited
    Edmund Meinerts wrote
    Demetris wrote
    Well pre-LOTR, he experimented.

    You don't call scores like Cosmopolis or Maps to the Stars experimental?


    Nah, i feel like they're done by someone outside their comfort territory, or specialized knowledge / genre .
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
  7. Don't know about COSMOPOLIS... it's not as far from CRASH as you're suggesting. I can't see how one can be evidence of strength and the other proof of staleness. Projection, methinks.
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
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      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeOct 16th 2014
    Oh, it is different to my ears, cosmopolis and maps to the stars, his post-LOTR synthy scores, don't feel or sound like his older ones.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
  8. Look I've sort of lost the love of Shore since 2003 as well. But you're fighting specifics with generalities. 'These 2 things are very similar' vs 'but I feel it's all different now'. wink
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeOct 16th 2014
    I keep hoping the new posts in this thread will reveal some kind of preview or report about the next (and final) Middle Earth score...being one of the loyal few who adored Smaug, I can't wait to see what new wonders Shore has in store for us. I expect to hear some of the biggest epic action pieces ever composed!
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
  9. Being loyal is good, but does that suggest the rest of us have been disloyal to the maestro? wink you've been patient, I'll give you that.
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
    •  
      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeOct 16th 2014
    franz_conrad wrote
    Being loyal is good, but does that suggest the rest of us have been disloyal to the maestro? wink you've been patient, I'll give you that.


    No, not what I meant, sorry if it came across as uppity or anything. I just mean it's one thing to enjoy the endless scorgasmic highlights of the LotR trilogy, and another thing to consistently enjoy the musical universe and unique stylings that Shore has employed, even when they are used in darker, less boldly melodic ways as has often been the case in the Hobbit scores.
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
  10. Sorry Scribe -- I'm just being a tease. smile
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2014
    franz_conrad wrote
    Look I've sort of lost the love of Shore since 2003 as well. But you're fighting specifics with generalities. 'These 2 things are very similar' vs 'but I feel it's all different now'. wink


    No, that's the thing, they do sound different. There's more synth in there, which is less focused, less coherent than the old works. He's trying to sound more modern by employing newer electronica sounds that he clearly doesn't sound like he knows how to properly handle. It's not just 'feeling' different, it also is different in its core, the music's building.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
  11. Demetris wrote
    Edmund Meinerts wrote
    Demetris wrote
    Well pre-LOTR, he experimented.

    You don't call scores like Cosmopolis or Maps to the Stars experimental?


    Nah, i feel like they're done by someone outside their comfort territory, or specialized knowledge / genre .

    Isn't that the definition of "experimenting"? To go outside your comfort zone? confused
    •  
      CommentAuthorDemetris
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2014
    Yes, but you must have the knowledge of the genre and its tools to do it correctly. It's not always a success. Imagine John Williams doing dubstep.
    Love Maintitles. It's full of Wanders.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 17th 2014
    Demetris wrote
    Yes, but you must have the knowledge of the genre and its tools to do it correctly. It's not always a success. Imagine John Williams doing dubstep.


    Well, he did about 30 seconds of techno in A.I. smile
    I am extremely serious.
  12. The difference between techno and dupstep has eluded me so far.
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
  13. Scribe wrote
    I keep hoping the new posts in this thread will reveal some kind of preview or report about the next (and final) Middle Earth score...being one of the loyal few who adored Smaug, I can't wait to see what new wonders Shore has in store for us. I expect to hear some of the biggest epic action pieces ever composed!


    yeah
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
  14. Demetris wrote
    It's not always a success. Imagine John Williams doing dubstep.


    Shudder.
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am