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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    Erik Woods wrote
    Thor wrote
    The most gut-wrenching moment in the film is - to me - the forest separation scene. Unquestionably. That is the FIRST time Haley Joel Osment even HINTS at some sort of emotional reaction, which makes it all the more powerful.


    I don't feel a damn thing because he is a ROBOT!

    -Erik-


    YOU don't feel a thing because HE is a robot? Hmmm, OK then. Personally, I don't see the problem in identifying with non-human characters as long as those characters are fleshed out. Am I the only one who felt bad when R2-D2 got blown to pieces in STAR WARS (but then touchingly repaired for the Throne Room)? And that's a robot that doesn't even LOOK LIKE a human!

    In the aforementioned forest scene, I was completely taken by surprise as I had already gotten used to David as a robot with no external emotional reactions. I assumed it was supposed to be that way for the rest of the film too. So when he hints at some form of emotional reaction in that scene, it was a real SHOCK to the system.
    I am extremely serious.
  1. Erik Woods wrote
    Thor wrote
    The most gut-wrenching moment in the film is - to me - the forest separation scene. Unquestionably. That is the FIRST time Haley Joel Osment even HINTS at some sort of emotional reaction, which makes it all the more powerful.


    I don't feel a damn thing because he is a ROBOT!

    -Erik-


    You unsentimental human being, you !!!
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    Erik Woods wrote
    Thor wrote
    The most gut-wrenching moment in the film is - to me - the forest separation scene. Unquestionably. That is the FIRST time Haley Joel Osment even HINTS at some sort of emotional reaction, which makes it all the more powerful.


    I don't feel a damn thing because he is a ROBOT!

    -Erik-


    He might be a robot, but he's a robot with feelings (that's the whole point of the film). That's why I thought it was a particularly good scene.
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009 edited
    Thor wrote

    YOU don't feel a thing because HE is a robot? Hmmm, OK then. Personally, I don't see the problem in identifying with non-human characters as long as those characters are fleshed out. Am I the only one who felt bad when R2-D2 got blown to pieces in STAR WARS (but then touchingly repaired for the Throne Room)? And that's a robot that doesn't even LOOK LIKE a human!


    Exactly! Or what about Wall-E when he gets damaged at the end of the film? Or what about Bishop in Aliens? Data in Star Trek? The beauty of sci-fi is that it toys with our inherent notions of what we think we should feel empathy towards.

    Personally I'm of the belief that if a robot was ever to become sophisticated enough to feel emotion, to have a brain as complex as our own, then I would consider it a form of life.
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    Steven wrote
    Erik Woods wrote
    Thor wrote
    The most gut-wrenching moment in the film is - to me - the forest separation scene. Unquestionably. That is the FIRST time Haley Joel Osment even HINTS at some sort of emotional reaction, which makes it all the more powerful.


    I don't feel a damn thing because he is a ROBOT!

    -Erik-


    He might be a robot, but he's a robot with feelings (that's the whole point of the film). That's why I thought it was a particularly good scene.


    Again, he is still a ROBOT. I don't care if he has PROGRAMMED feelings are not. Goddamn skin job!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009 edited
    edit; [second thoughts, what's the point]
  2. I think perhaps Erik is playing the part...
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
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      CommentAuthorSunil
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    You unsentimental human being, you !!!


    applause to Gilles! lol
    Racism, Prejudices and discrimination exists everywhere.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    franz_conrad wrote
    I think perhaps Erik is playing the part...


    I suspect so too. smile
    I am extremely serious.
  3. Same here, he's just too smart for us. Like a robot. smile
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    Thor wrote
    franz_conrad wrote
    I think perhaps Erik is playing the part...


    I suspect so too. smile


    I'd like to say so but I'm not. That's how I felt watching the movie. They are all robots and I really have no emotional connection to them. For instance, I understand what Spielberg was going for with the flesh fair but I had no sympathy for ANY of the robots no matter how well programmed their "human emotions" were. They are still machines.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009 edited
    Erik Woods wrote
    They are still machines.


    Thing is, whether you've intended to or not, you've inadvertently dug up a pretty age-old philosophical conundrum which deserves qualification on which ever side of the 'argument' you lie on. If you want to give a qualification, feel free to. If not, no worries.

    With this suggestion, I'm going against my own advice.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    Erik Woods wrote
    Thor wrote
    franz_conrad wrote
    I think perhaps Erik is playing the part...


    I suspect so too. smile


    I'd like to say so but I'm not. That's how I felt watching the movie. They are all robots and I really have no emotional connection to them. For instance, I understand what Spielberg was going for with the flesh fair but I had no sympathy for ANY of the robots no matter how well programmed their "human emotions" were. They are still machines.

    -Erik-


    Just curious....is that something you feel (no pun intended) for all film characters that are not humans (or animals)?
    I am extremely serious.
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    Thor wrote
    Erik Woods wrote
    Thor wrote
    franz_conrad wrote
    I think perhaps Erik is playing the part...


    I suspect so too. smile


    I'd like to say so but I'm not. That's how I felt watching the movie. They are all robots and I really have no emotional connection to them. For instance, I understand what Spielberg was going for with the flesh fair but I had no sympathy for ANY of the robots no matter how well programmed their "human emotions" were. They are still machines.

    -Erik-


    Just curious....is that something you feel (no pun intended) for all film characters that are not humans (or animals)?


    I have a very, very soft spot for animals. I cried like a baby when I watched stuff like The Bear or Eight Below. As for robots... I don't know what to say.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    Just a gut feeling you'd rather not explain then?
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009 edited
    Steven wrote
    Just a gut feeling you'd rather not explain then?


    I don't know what to say. I'm not really a philosophical person and don't have strong writing skills to truly describe what I feel on the matter. I just don't get all mushy when robots get axed in movies. I don't consider them to be living things. But then I guess I have to go into what I mean when I say "living" because I guess I should get all choked up when a tree get obliterated by an explosion. So, I try to avoid conversations of that sort because in all honesty it seems like those types of discussions just go around in circles. Plus, those discussions just flat out don't interest me.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
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      CommentAuthorDreamTheater
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009 edited
    But a robot that wants to be human and all the pain and emotion that causes, has to produce some kind of feeling? Robot-child or not, I feel for the little guy and I don't lie when I say the movie touches my very soul.

    And Eight Below was just one big cry-fest. cry Husky's rock. cool
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009 edited
    Erik Woods wrote
    Steven wrote
    Just a gut feeling you'd rather not explain then?


    I don't know what to say. I'm not really a philosophical person and don't have strong writing skills to truly describe what I feel on the matter. I just don't get all mushy when robots get axed in movies. I don't consider them to be living things. But then I guess I have to go into what I mean when I say "living" and well that just flat out doesn't interest me.

    -Erik-


    No, that's cool. I'm not trying to push you into a philosophical discussion, if you're not interested, you're not interested. You've answered my question right there anyway.

    I on the other hand wouldn't be content with simply accepting it as a 'gut feeling', I'd want to go further and find out exactly why I have this feeling and how I can qualitatively describe or at least discuss its validity. But I guess that's where we differ more so than the baron Saharan desert to the Amazonian tropical rain forest.
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    Steven wrote
    Erik Woods wrote
    Steven wrote
    Just a gut feeling you'd rather not explain then?


    I don't know what to say. I'm not really a philosophical person and don't have strong writing skills to truly describe what I feel on the matter. I just don't get all mushy when robots get axed in movies. I don't consider them to be living things. But then I guess I have to go into what I mean when I say "living" and well that just flat out doesn't interest me.

    -Erik-


    No, that's cool. I'm not trying to push you into a philosophical discussion, if you're not interested, you're not interested. You've answered my question right there anyway.

    I on the other hand wouldn't be content with simply accepting it as a 'gut feeling', I'd want to go further and find out exactly why I have this feeling and how I can qualitatively describe or at least discuss its validity. But I guess that's where we differ more so than the baron Saharan desert to the Amazonian tropical rain forest.


    Look, maybe over a beer or something I might get into such a discussion. Honestly, I don't like complicating things. But I will say this... and maybe I should just make this my last statement on the subject but deep down inside I know that seeing a robot with programmed feeling getting chopped up or ripped to shreds is no different then flicking the on/off switch behind its head. Not sure if that comes across right... anyway... Raiders of the Lost Ark is on... can't... keep... myself... from... watching...

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  4. Bye Erik, see you in 2 hours, have fun with Indy! beer
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    And again, that's cool I understand. (But be warned I'm infinitely worse when I have beer in me... there'll be no shutting me up.)
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    Anyway, back on topic. I watched Catch Me If You Can for the zillionth time last night, and it never fails to charm the crap out of me. I think it's one of Spielberg's better films with absolutely spot-on direction, subtle and brilliant performances and a wonderful jazzy score from Williams. Also brilliant cinematography from Janusz Kaminski, who's style can -but not in this film- annoy me (not everything in the background has to look like an opening to heaven! slant ).
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    Steven wrote
    And again, that's cool I understand. (But be warned I'm infinitely worse when I have beer in me... there'll be no shutting me up.)


    I'm with Erik on this as far as talking it over a beer ( or ten wink ), you may find that I'm the one who won't shut up.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    We'll add that on our list of things not to do when we don't meet up for those non-existent beers! biggrin
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    Excellent! I can't wait for that to not happen.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
  5. Looks like you guys will be waiting forever for the non-event of the century. I do not envy you. smile
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    Nah, the beauty of our non-event is that it happens all the time. We're constantly drinking non-beers and having non-discussions! You should join us. It's awesome.
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    Everyone completely misses the point, I think.
    Erik didn't care...because maybe the whole setup was wrong! I couldn't give a toss either...but then I realized it's because the direction is cold and aloof and the characters unlikeable.

    I don't believe for a second Erik didn't give two shits about C-3PO getting blasted, or the reaction of Dewey and and Huey when Louie gets torn off the ship in Silent Running.

    The androids in A.I. did nothing but annoy me.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    Martijn wrote
    I don't believe for a second Erik didn't give two shits about C-3PO getting blasted, or the reaction of Dewey and and Huey when Louie gets torn off the ship in Silent Running.


    Actually, the reaction I got was "Who the fuck shot C-3PO?!?!" I actually didn't really think about 3P0 until Chewie found him in the trash!

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeAug 24th 2009
    You green-blooded son of a bitch!
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn