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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010 edited
    Christodoulides wrote
    What's with Desplat that you dont' like Martijn?


    We've already addressed that in great length here, mate. smile
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    I think what's happening with everyone that doesn't like Desplat is that they are - subconsciously or otherwise - picking up on the way he records his scores (fragmented and separately with different sets of musicians so that the whole idea and final product is never heard by the musicians) and interpreting that as "cold" and "unemotional" even though the music itself is clearly not those things. And those people are never going to like Desplat unless they look beyond the subtle, but very real difference that recording methodology makes in the feel of the final product. I admit I struggled with that at first, until I realized what Desplat was doing and why, and identified that as the source of my discomfort with his music. And once I identified that, I was free to enjoy Desplat's music for what it is. Mostly I'm just happy that someone in the film music world is doing something different, and succeeding with it.
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    But surely that technique has been a staple for decades? Whenever you get a score where session musicians are hired (or even an orchestra with an insane turnover rate like The Hollywood Orchestra), that's the technique to use (it makes a lot of sense from an efficiency point of view).

    I agree that musicians hearing and playing (and thus understanding) a whole work rather than bits and pieces will greatly add to their emotional involvement, which you will hear in the end product...but I don't think it's as recent or innovative or rare as you suggest.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    I'm sure you're right, I think Desplat just does it to a greater degree than most other composers, so it has a greater effect. Otherwise people in the community wouldn't have gone to the trouble to point it out and highlight it so much in articles about him and interviews with him.

    I also think that there's something in the way Desplat's recordings get mixed that turns people off. For example, take the track "Dreamcatcher" from New Moon. Those flute phrases that get overlayed in between the main phrases of Jacob's theme during the last minute of the track. As a musical idea those flute phrases are brilliant and should be deeply moving and beautiful. But the way they are mixed make them feel like the flutes are somehow sitting on top of the rest of the music and not a part of the whole...causing the emotional impact to be completely different...some might say completely wrong. Personally I'm not sure whether Desplat is just bad at mixing these elements, or if it's being done deliberately to create a certain effect.
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    Interesting comments, Matt.
    I wouldn't think you're very far from the truth there.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorDemonStar
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    Scribe wrote
    I haven't even heard Largo Winch yet, but I'm greatly looking forward to discovering it!!


    Definitely check it out - it's a great action score with some superb Bond-ish orchestral writing! smile
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    Martijn wrote
    Steven wrote

    NP: Angel - Philippe Rombi


    I think there's a time and a place to listen to a score like Angel. I find listening to it in the day time is not the best time, nor just listening to it on my iPod. I prefer to wait until the evening, put on my Sennheisers (because that's what I use and I'm better than you) perhaps just before I'm about to go to bed... it's very lovely. smile


    Fair enough, Sleeps-With-Sennheisers.
    As common opinion holds this score in so high regard, I will give it another go in more favourable circumstances.
    (Let it never be said I do not keep an open mind: I spent a whole day and a half on re-appreciate Desplat!
    Didn't work, incidentally)


    It's good to know you'll give it a try, Stands-With-Fist.

    The only thing about that score I'm not too keen on is the cheesy happy-go-lucky theme. Apart from that, I think it's more charming than a puppy with a bow tie.
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    Matt - The issue you brought up with Desplat's recording and mixing methods is part of my distaste for Desplat. I am NOT a fan at all of dividing the orchestra and recording their elements separately - with the exception of recording chorus or percussion separately. When the orchestra is playing together they feed of one another and feel the music together. I know composers want more control over the sound of their music but I don't like Desplat's approach to recording a score... which has been used my many of Zimmer's former and present RC team members as well.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  1. Erik Woods wrote I know composers want more control over the sound of their music but I don't like Desplat's approach to recording a score... which has been used my many of Zimmer's former and present RC team members as well.


    Just a tool, to very different effect. wink
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    But it's the same effect...making the music seem and feel cold and uninspired.

    The difference is in the quality of the writing...RC composers are sometimes actually writing cold and uninspired music, whereas Desplat's writing is excellent, only to be obscured by the way the music is performed and recorded.
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
  2. Hi, my name is Scribe, and I like to assert my opinion as though it was shared by everyone. wink
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    Hi scribe. Won't you join me?
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    franz_conrad wrote
    Hi, my name is Scribe, and I like to assert my opinion as though it was shared by everyone. wink


    Could you perhaps point out precisely which of my above assertations are, in fact, not shared by everyone?
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
  3. I do not find a layered recording of precisely executed instrumental performances to be either cold or uninspired as an aesthetic. I like that I can hear the tension of the parallel ideas that normally get swamped in texture. But hey, I think he's the best thing to happen to film music in a long time. The recording is part of that.
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    It's also part of the reason I like him so much.

    On the other hand, I am seemingly the only person in the world who doesn't spontaneously ejaculate at the very mention of Philippe Rombi. So something must be wrong with me.
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010 edited
    franz_conrad wrote
    I do not find a layered recording of precisely executed instrumental performances to be either cold or uninspired as an aesthetic. I like that I can hear the tension of the parallel ideas that normally get swamped in texture. But hey, I think he's the best thing to happen to film music in a long time. The recording is part of that.


    The intended target audience of my post was people who are/were uncomfortable with Desplat's music. I seem
    to have momentarily forgotten that audience is not universal. So, point taken, and thank you. smile
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    NP: Kick-Ass - Jackman and Vries (mostly)

    It's fun, and less messy than it could have been, considering all the changes in composer it went through. Jackman's heroic theme is my favorite part. Between this and "Ginormica Suite" from Monsters vs Aliens, I am dying to hear more of this side of Jackman.
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
  4. The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas - Horner

    Always a soothing and gorgeous listen, this must have one of the best themes he has come up with in recent years, not to mention a very distinct magical whimsical atmosphere reminiscent of his early work. Horner's ability to construct fine melodies has never really disappeared, only underused in the past decade and this score shows that he can still write very emotionally when the film (or whoever wants it) demands it. The 10 minute cue is a stunner and I love how he builds to that nerve-wrecking finish.
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010 edited
    Southall wrote
    On the other hand, I am seemingly the only person in the world who doesn't spontaneously ejaculate at the very mention of Philippe Rombi. So something must be wrong with me.


    Philippe Rombi?

    Ohh....oohhh.... OHHHHH.

    .... cool
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    DreamTheater wrote
    The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas - Horner
    The 10 minute cue is a stunner and I love how he builds to that nerve-wrecking finish.


    Nerve-wracking indeed. One of the few moments in my entire collection that I find truly frightening.
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
  5. It's nerve-wracking? Pardon my french... I mean english. wink
    "considering I've seen an enormous debate here about The Amazing Spider-Man and the ones who love it, and the ones who hate it, I feel myself obliged to say: TASTE DIFFERS, DEAL WITH IT" - Thomas G.
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    I believe so....
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    Explorers - Jerry Goldsmith

    Delightfully good. The main theme is one of Goldsmith's catchiest.
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010 edited
    Andes To Amazon - Nicholas Hooper

    This is the kind of score I really, really love,
    Beautiful, majestic, thoroughly thematic and melodic, with wonderful Peruvian and Brazilian ethnic touches.
    Of course the subject of this documentary lends itself to the most soaring and awe-inspiring kinds of music (I can just picture grand sweeping vistas of the mighty Amazon), but that doesn't diminish the wonder and reverent beauty in the execution of this lovely music one little bit.

    I'm utterly, thoroughly enjoying this enchanting score. And I feel like taking a major trip.
    Brazil would be good, I think.

    smile
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    Martijn wrote
    Andes To Amazon - Nicholas Hooper


    Sold.
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
  6. Southall wrote
    On the other hand, I am seemingly the only person in the world who doesn't spontaneously ejaculate at the very mention of Philippe Rombi. So something must be wrong with me.


    Much as I like Philippe Rombi, I think whoever said Chris Gordon was probably the most overrated composer on these boards (since his hype is relative to only a handful of scores) probably should have said it of Rombi on those grounds.
    (Read it again everyone, I'm not actually saying he's overrated.)
    A butterfly thinks therefore I am
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      CommentAuthorScribe
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    You are quite right.

    and the solution for both of these situations is obviously MORE SCORES biggrin
    I love you all. Never change. Well, unless you want to!
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    franz_conrad wrote
    Southall wrote
    On the other hand, I am seemingly the only person in the world who doesn't spontaneously ejaculate at the very mention of Philippe Rombi. So something must be wrong with me.


    Much as I like Philippe Rombi, I think whoever said Chris Gordon was probably the most overrated composer on these boards (since his hype is relative to only a handful of scores) probably should have said it of Rombi on those grounds.


    <making popcorn, sitting back, waiting for D. to enter...>
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    franz_conrad wrote
    Southall wrote
    On the other hand, I am seemingly the only person in the world who doesn't spontaneously ejaculate at the very mention of Philippe Rombi. So something must be wrong with me.


    Much as I like Philippe Rombi, I think whoever said Chris Gordon was probably the most overrated composer on these boards (since his hype is relative to only a handful of scores) probably should have said it of Rombi on those grounds.
    (Read it again everyone, I'm not actually saying he's overrated.)


    I don't dislike Rombi by any means, but my very limited exposure to his music has yet to leave me truly wowed. I mean, it's nice and all, but it hasn't made a special connection to me.
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      CommentAuthorSouthall
    • CommentTimeJul 1st 2010
    Martijn wrote
    Andes To Amazon - Nicholas Hooper

    This is the kind of score I really, really love,
    Beautiful, majestic, thoroughly thematic and melodic, with wonderful Peruvian and Brazilian ethnic touches.
    Of course the subject of this documentary lends itself to the most soaring and awe-inspiring kinds of music (I can just picture grand sweeping vistas of the mighty Amazon), but that doesn't diminish the wonder and reverent beauty in the execution of this lovely music one little bit.

    I'm utterly, thoroughly enjoying this enchanting score. And I feel like taking a major trip.
    Brazil would be good, I think.

    smile


    Now this sounds interesting. Is it new? On CD?