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    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2015
    It has MOUNTAINS in the title, that'll suffice. wink

    Which scores did you have to omit from your play list?
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2015
    I'm too drnunk to say right now, but I'll chime in tomorrow with the 'lost' picks.
    I am extremely serious.
  1. You sound ominously sober though ... wink
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
  2. Yeah, only one typo? Quit shamming!
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2015
    Dammit, I lost my short list with some of the titles that didn't make the cut.

    But off the top of my head, I remember SHOOT TO KILL (John Scott) and WHERE EAGLES DARE (Ron Goodwin) were being considered.
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2015
    Episode # 36: Alan Silvestri in Ghent (11th International Edition)

    We had the great pleasure of interviewing the great Alan Silvestri for this latest episode.

    http://celluloidtunes.no/celluloid-tune … l-edition/

    PLAYLIST:

    Silvestri on electronic music
    Critical Condition (1987) – «Main Title»
    Silvestri on COSMOS
    Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey (2014) – «The Speed of Light»
    Silvestri on Zemeckis
    Beowulf (2007) – «What We Need is a Hero»/»A Hero Comes Home»
    Silvestri on FLIGHT
    Flight (2012) – «Nichole Leaves Hotel»/»Nichole Returns Home»/»Whip’s Mad Drive»
    Silvestri on THE WALK
    The Walk (2015) – «Pourqoui»
    Silvestri on BACK TO THE FUTURE
    Back to the Future (1985) – «Back to the Future Suite»
    Silvestri on next project
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2015
    Episode # 37: Giorgio Moroder in Oslo (12th International Edition)

    Another favourite composer crossed off the bucket list! Apparently, he told some stories here he hadn't told before, so check it out. It's in English.

    http://celluloidtunes.no/celluloid-tune … l-edition/

    PLAYLIST:

    Midnight Express (1978) — «The Wheel»
    American Gigolo (1980) — «Palm Springs Drive»
    Scarface (1983) — «Tony’s Theme»
    The Neverending Story (1984) — «Swamp of Sadness»
    Electric Dreams (1984) — «The Duel»
    Metropolis (1927/1984) — «The Legend of Babel»
    Cat People (1982) — «Paul’s Theme»
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2015
    I think I've overestimated the potential popularity of this programme. It seems to be appreciated by "regular folks", while most film music people couldn't care less! LOL!
    I am extremely serious.
  3. There's a certain crowd of film composers (usually crossover types) who get a lot more buzz from film fans or "regular folks" than from the actual film score community: Moroder, Faltermeyer, Santaolalla, Reznor etc.

    I like to call it the emperor's new clothes effect.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2015
    Yeah, I know. I'm happy that I can exist perfectly in both "camps". smile
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2015
    Thor wrote
    I think I've overestimated the potential popularity of this programme. It seems to be appreciated by "regular folks", while most film music people couldn't care less! LOL!


    Why do you think so?
    Did you get that as feedback (I don't see *any* comments on the site sad ).

    I'm definitely going to listen to this when I get home!
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2015 edited
    Martijn wrote
    Thor wrote
    I think I've overestimated the potential popularity of this programme. It seems to be appreciated by "regular folks", while most film music people couldn't care less! LOL!


    Why do you think so?
    Did you get that as feedback (I don't see *any* comments on the site sad ).

    I'm definitely going to listen to this when I get home!


    No, it's my own expectations that were totally out of whack. I thought there would be an aramada of feedback, social media sharing etc. as soon as I published (since he is probably the biggest star I've had on the show -- no offense to Silvestri, Horner, Martinez, Goldenthal, JNH, Doyle or Fenton). Maybe I made a mistake of publishing while most US people were still fast asleep. These things are tricky.
    I am extremely serious.
  4. I'd think Horner has got Moroder beat! Not to mention that for general (consensus) film music fans, a lot of those other names are simply far more dear to us than Moroder's. But Horner might even give him a run for the money with regular folks.
    • CommentAuthorTimmer
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2015
    Facts is facts! Moroder towers way above all those mentioned composers.
    On Friday I ate a lot of dust and appeared orange near the end of the day ~ Bregt
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2015
    I have to say I really enjoyed the episode (I figured out a way to listen to it at work smile ).
    Moroeder seems a very amiable guy, and I found the questions (and answers) were original and enlightening.
    I didn't even hate the music (that much).
    And I liked finally hearing your voice!

    Just three critical remarks:
    1) Metropolis is not directed by F.W. Murnau as Moroder suggests, but by Fritz Lang.
    2) Leni Riefenstahl was never a Nazi (although I of course get where he comes from, and she WAS a personal friend of the Führer).
    3) You never mentioned my 'burp in the Universe' comment to him... sad
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2015 edited
    Ha, ha...forgot about the 'burp'.

    I thought maybe Moroder referred to the Murnau Stiffnung -- which I assumed was an institute that had more than just Murnau's material, but also works by other German expressionists. But of course, he could very well be confusing Murnau with Lang too. His memory wasn't top notch (as when I had to hum the "Swamp of Sadness" theme to him)!

    Thanks for listening, Martijn.
    I am extremely serious.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2015
    Thor wrote
    Ha, ha...forgot about the 'burp'.


    Suuuuure you did. angry

    wink

    I thought maybe Moroder referred to the Murnau Stiffnung -- which I assumed was an institute that had more than just Murnau's material, but also works by other German expressionists.


    You know, you may well be right!
    While its main focus is indeed Murnau's work, for sure the Foundation has taken Metropolis under its wing.

    Just checked, and indeedy: from the German site:
    Die Stiftung übernahm 1966 die Filmmaterialien (samt den dazugehörigen Auswertungsrechten) der mit dem Gesetz zur Abwicklung und Entflechtung des ehemaligen reichseigenen Filmvermögens vom 5. Juni 1953 aufgelösten deutschen Filmproduktionsgesellschaften, d. h. der Universum Film AG, der Ufa-Filmkunst GmbH, der Terra, der Tobis, der Bavaria und der Berlin-Film GmbH, einschließlich der Nachkriegsproduktion der Ufa-Filmkunst GmbH und der Bavaria.

    Darunter finden sich Filmklassiker wie Metropolis, Die Nibelungen, Das Cabinet des Dr. Caligari, Der blaue Engel, Die Drei von der Tankstelle, Münchhausen, Große Freiheit Nr. 7 und Helden von Regisseuren wie Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau, Fritz Lang, Ernst Lubitsch, Detlef Sierck, Helmut Käutner und Wolfgang Staudte.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
  5. Listening to it now. Well done, Thor! Well done indeed!

    Is Moroder really that big anymore? I mostly assossiate him with the late 70s and the 80s. I also always saw him as songwriter in the first place. Film scoring I always saw has his secondary occupation. He didn't release anything new in quite a long time. New material began to surface rather recently.

    smile Volker
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
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      CommentAuthorSteven
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2015
    Well done Erik indeed.
  6. shame That's where association can carry you. Well, whatever Erik did recently, I'm sure he did it very well, too.
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2015 edited
    Captain Future wrote
    Listening to it now. Well done, Thor! Well done indeed!

    Is Moroder really that big anymore? I mostly assossiate him with the late 70s and the 80s. I also always saw him as songwriter in the first place. Film scoring I always saw has his secondary occupation. He didn't release anything new in quite a long time. New material began to surface rather recently.

    smile Volker


    I think Moroder is having some sort of renaissance these days, and not only because of the world tour, but especially after his work with Daft Punk a couple of years ago. For his new album, Deja Vu, he gets to work with a lot of big, contemporary acts.

    However, JMJ never sought him out for his electronica project (as far as I know), which is a bit weird.
    I am extremely serious.
  7. Maybe not everyone JMJ contacted was interested in participating?
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
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      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2015
    Captain Future wrote
    Maybe not everyone JMJ contacted was interested in participating?


    That's a possibility. Would be curious to know if he ever approached people like Harold Faltermeyer, Jan Hammer, Vangelis or more contemporary electronica gurus like Paul Oakenfold, Moby, Juno Reactor (i.e. Ben Watkins) etc.
    I am extremely serious.
  8. Who's going to feature on Electronica 2 anyway, beyond Hans Zimmer?
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.
    •  
      CommentAuthorThor
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2015
    Captain Future wrote
    Who's going to feature on Electronica 2 anyway, beyond Hans Zimmer?


    From what we know so far -- Zimmer, Gary Numan and David Lynch(!). I'm sure more will be announced eventually.
    I am extremely serious.
  9. Timmer wrote
    Facts is facts! Moroder towers way above all those mentioned composers.

    lol
    •  
      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeNov 14th 2015
    Steven wrote
    Well done Erik indeed.


    What did I do?

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
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      CommentAuthorMartijn
    • CommentTimeNov 14th 2015 edited
    The Captain in the post preceding Steven's mistakenly complimented you on the Moroder interview.
    'no passion nor excitement here, despite all the notes and musicians' ~ Falkirkbairn
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      CommentAuthorErik Woods
    • CommentTimeNov 14th 2015
    Oh.

    -Erik-
    host and producer of CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO | www.cinematicsound.net | www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | I HAVE TINNITUS!
  10. Erik Woods wrote
    Oh.

    -Erik-


    Oh indeed. dizzy
    Bach's music is vibrant and inspired.